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NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Aomar Ouali and Paul Schemm, Associated Press
ALGIERS, Algeria - Algerian forces scoured the Sahara Desert on Tuesday, searching for five foreign energy workers who vanished during a chaotic four-day battle with hostage-taking Islamist militants. One official says the men may have fled the sprawling complex during the fighting and gotten lost. The four-day confrontation that began when al-Qaeda-affiliated militants stormed the remote desert natural-gas complex and took hostages early last Wednesday, was punctuated by exploding cars, attacks from helicopters, and a final assault by Algerian special forces.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1999 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In an American business meeting, direct eye contact and a firm handshake can say it all. But would you know that if your roots spring from a culture on the other side of the globe? Foreign-born business professionals, well-educated and fluent in textbook English, will get a chance to learn such American cultural norms with a new program in English as a second language (ESL) in Chester County this fall. The Business Development & Training Center in East Whiteland is teaming up with Villanova University to give a five-week evening ESL program starting Sept.
NEWS
August 1, 1998 | By Jim Puzzanghera, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
High-tech companies desperate for an increase in visa limits to bring more skilled foreign workers into the country will have to wait. The White House short-circuited a compromise that congressional leaders were poised to rush through the Senate yesterday. The bill was expected to win House approval next week. But the bill never came up for a vote after the Clinton administration renewed a veto threat Thursday and issued 15 proposed revisions to the legislation. That means the cap cannot be increased until September at the earliest, when the Senate returns from a monthlong summer recess.
NEWS
September 25, 1998 | By Jim Puzzanghera, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The House voted yesterday to open the nation's borders wider for skilled foreign workers by expanding a specialized visa program to address a worker shortage that high-tech executives say threatens their industry's growth. The 288-133 vote was made possible by a compromise between the White House and congressional leaders. If approved by the Senate and signed by President Clinton as expected, the bill will help high-tech companies meet a demand for engineers and programmers so great that this year's legal limit on so-called H-1B visas was reached in May, nearly five months before the end of the federal fiscal year.
NEWS
January 7, 2004 | By Ron Hutcheson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Bush will outline plans today for an overhaul of the nation's immigration laws to make it easier for foreign workers to get jobs in the United States. In a bid to end decades of restrictive immigration policies, Bush will call for the creation of a guest-worker program that would open the borders to immigrants seeking low-skilled, low-wage jobs. It would also let the estimated eight million workers who are here illegally get legal status by joining the guest-worker program.
NEWS
May 19, 1998 | By Jim Puzzanghera, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Senate heeded the pleas of many of the nation's top high-tech companies yesterday and easily passed legislation temporarily opening America's borders to more skilled foreign workers. The legislation, adopted 78-20, would increase the number of special visas used largely to bring in high-tech workers from other countries. Those so-called H-1B visas are now limited to 65,000 a year, a number that has already been reached for fiscal 1997, five months before it ends. The bill would increase that to 95,000 for each of the next five years, beginning in the current fiscal year.
NEWS
September 15, 1996 | By Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
HELP WANTED: Auto mechanic for a service station in Alexandria, Va.; pays $17.57 an hour. Accountant for an investment firm in Wilmington; pays $40,000 a year. Carpet layer for a rug company in Laurel, Md., $16.40 an hour. Pharmacist for a drugstore in Huntington, W. Va.; pays $55,000. Software engineer for a phone company in Murray Hill, N.J.; pays $45,700. Manager of a savings and loan in York, Pa.; pays $25,000. Don't feel especially qualified for any of those openings?
NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Camden County company will pay $34,200 in back wages to 55 workers and $48,000 in civil penalties after violating the federal Immigration and Nationality Act, the U.S. Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division said Monday. Popsy Pop L.L.C. in Somerdale recruited workers from Eastern Europe, Central and South America, and the Caribbean to drive trucks and sell ice cream throughout New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware. The law allows employers to temporarily hire nonimmigrant workers to perform nonagricultural labor or services.
NEWS
December 4, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Camden County company will pay $34,200 in back wages to 55 workers and $48,000 in civil penalties after violating of the federal Immigration and Nationality Act, the U.S. Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division said Monday. Popsy Pop LLC in Somerdale recruited workers from Eastern Europe, Central and South America and the Caribbean to drive trucks and sell ice cream throughout New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Delaware. The law allows employers to temporarily hire nonimmigrant workers to perform nonagricultural labor or services.
SPORTS
March 2, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
The Montreal Expos will be allowed to use replacement players after all. The federal government yesterday reversed a ruling that stopped foreign replacements from playing for the Expos during the players' strike. Pam Cullum, a spokeswoman for the Immigration Department, said, "the original intent of this regulation was to protect Canadian workers involved in a labor dispute against replacement by foreign workers. We were finding in this situation that it was protecting foreign workers from replacement by other foreign workers.
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NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By David Nakamura, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Labor and business leaders announced Thursday that they have agreed in principle to terms that would establish a new guest-worker program for foreigners, but they cautioned that details of the program are still being negotiated. In a joint statement, AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka and U.S. Chamber of Commerce president Thomas Donohue expressed optimism over talks on how to make it easier for companies to hire foreign nationals when Americans are not available. "We have found common ground in several important areas and have committed to continue to work together," the two leaders said.
NEWS
February 19, 2013 | By Shehu Saulawa and Jon Gambrell, Associated Press
BAUCHI, Nigeria - Gunmen attacked a camp for a construction company in rural northern Nigeria, killing a guard and kidnapping seven foreign workers from Britain, Greece, Italy, Lebanon, and the Philippines, authorities said Sunday, in the biggest kidnapping yet in a region under attack by Islamic extremists. The attack Saturday night happened in Jama'are, a town in a rural portion of Bauchi state. There, the gunmen first attacked a local prison, burning two police trucks, Bauchi state police spokesman Hassan Muhammed told the Associated Press.
NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Aomar Ouali and Paul Schemm, Associated Press
ALGIERS, Algeria - Algerian forces scoured the Sahara Desert on Tuesday, searching for five foreign energy workers who vanished during a chaotic four-day battle with hostage-taking Islamist militants. One official says the men may have fled the sprawling complex during the fighting and gotten lost. The four-day confrontation that began when al-Qaeda-affiliated militants stormed the remote desert natural-gas complex and took hostages early last Wednesday, was punctuated by exploding cars, attacks from helicopters, and a final assault by Algerian special forces.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Michael Birnbaum and Anthony Faiola, Washington Post
An attack on a remote natural-gas complex in the Sahara desert was conducted by an international band of Islamist militants, apparently including two Canadians, who wore Algerian army uniforms and had help from the inside, Algeria's prime minister said Monday, in his government's first official accounting of the bloody four-day siege. Three Americans died in the violence and seven U.S. citizens survived, the State Department said Monday. The Algerian government captured three of the militants alive, Prime Minister Abdelmalek Sellal told reporters in Algiers, in remarks carried by the state-run news agency.
NEWS
January 19, 2013 | By Bradley Klapper, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - One American worker at a natural gas complex in Algeria has been found dead, U.S. officials said Friday as the Obama administration sought to secure the release of Americans still being held by militants on the third day of the hostage standoff in the Sahara. The officials identified the dead American as Frederick Buttaccio, a Texas resident, but said it was unclear how he died. They said U.S. officials recovered Buttaccio's remains Friday and notified his family. Officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they weren't authorized to speak publicly on the matter.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Aomar Ouali and Paul Schemm, Associated Press
ALGIERS, Algeria - Algerian special forces launched a rescue operation Thursday at a natural gas plant in the Sahara Desert and freed foreign hostages held by al-Qaeda-linked militants, but estimates for the number of dead varied wildly from four to dozens. Militants claiming revenge for France's intervention against rebels in Mali seized the Ain Amenas natural gas complex on Wednesday, taking dozens of foreign workers hostage. Algerian state television said Thursday that four captives - two Britons and two Filipinos - had died.
NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Camden County company will pay $34,200 in back wages to 55 workers and $48,000 in civil penalties after violating the federal Immigration and Nationality Act, the U.S. Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division said Monday. Popsy Pop L.L.C. in Somerdale recruited workers from Eastern Europe, Central and South America, and the Caribbean to drive trucks and sell ice cream throughout New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware. The law allows employers to temporarily hire nonimmigrant workers to perform nonagricultural labor or services.
NEWS
December 4, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Camden County company will pay $34,200 in back wages to 55 workers and $48,000 in civil penalties after violating of the federal Immigration and Nationality Act, the U.S. Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division said Monday. Popsy Pop LLC in Somerdale recruited workers from Eastern Europe, Central and South America and the Caribbean to drive trucks and sell ice cream throughout New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Delaware. The law allows employers to temporarily hire nonimmigrant workers to perform nonagricultural labor or services.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Grant and his team of 15 utility workers were on the scene Wednesday in Glenside, performing an aerial ballet with five bucket trucks as the linemen repaired a power line along Mount Carmel Avenue that had been knocked down by Hurricane Sandy. "We're from Florida," Grant told Linda Lee, who had lost her power Monday night and who delivered a container of peanut butter cookies to the workers. "We're going to have your power on in a couple of hours. " Grant and his crew are among a contingent of 70 Gulf Power Co. workers who arrived Tuesday night in Philadelphia after a 1,100-mile drive from Pensacola.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2012 | Joseph N. DiStefano
Pennsylvania employers brought in 3,418 mostly unskilled foreign workers under the federal government's H-2B visa program during fiscal year 2012 to fill jobs they said U.S. citizens in Pennsylvania did not want. Nemacolin Woodlands Resort and Spa, which operates a state-licensed gambling casino at Farmington, Fayette County, was certified by the U.S. Department of Labor to bring in 98 foreign maids and housekeepers, and 34 dishwashers, for the biggest H-2B workforce in the state.
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