CollectionsForensic Accountant
IN THE NEWS

Forensic Accountant

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 16, 2012
Ellis Levin, 65, of Cinnaminson and Brant Beach, N.J., a forensic accountant who worked on many major fraud investigations and audited institutions ranging from schools to international chemical giants, died Wednesday, Nov. 14, just weeks after learning he had an aggressive form of cancer. In the arcane world of accounting irregularities and audit failures, Mr. Levin was widely considered a whiz, driven by a passion to "get at the truth," as his family put it. Since graduating from the University of South Florida in 1969, he had practiced public accounting and, in the last 20 years, forensic accounting and litigation consulting.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1995 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At cocktail parties, Howard M. Silverstone gives one of two answers when asked what he does for a living. If he's bored and cranky and doesn't want to be there, he says he's an accountant. Whereupon the person trying to break the ice makes a break for the hors d'oeuvre table instead. If he's having fun, and is keen to mingle, he says what he really does for a living: forensic accounting. Although most people initially misunderstand his profession, and ask if it means that he does tax returns for dead people, they certainly do want to hear more.
NEWS
August 17, 1990 | By Michael L. Rozansky and Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writers
Montgomery County District Attorney Michael D. Marino has taken over an investigation of the Abington tax collector from the county controller and plans to hire a forensic accountant next week to review tax records, a source close to the case said yesterday. The review could take three or four weeks because "their records are in shambles," the source said. The source said the 1989 sewer fund, mercantile tax and other records would be studied. The Abington tax collector, George H. Snyder 3d, is under investigation by the county in connection with what the county says is a $240,000 shortage in four tax accounts he controls.
NEWS
January 12, 2011 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former La Salle University administrator pleaded guilty Tuesday to theft, forgery, and related offenses for embezzling $5 million from the school. Stephen Greb, 58, of Blue Bell, oversaw the university's food services from 1984, when he was hired, until he was fired in June after his scheme was uncovered by La Salle. Greb created a fictitious food vendor called Sunshine Foods and then authorized payments to that vendor as far back as 1990, officials said. The university conducted an internal investigation with the help of a forensic accountant after La Salle officials questioned a $40,000 payment to Sunshine.
NEWS
February 1, 2007 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The longtime manager of Northampton Township was charged yesterday with stealing more than $67,000 from the Bucks County municipality. D. Bruce Townsend, 55, is accused of using township credit cards to buy personal items ranging from groceries and videos to computer equipment and hotel rooms. Those thefts, which allegedly began in late 2001 and continued through last year, totaled more than $58,000, according to a criminal complaint. He also stole more than $4,900 in petty cash, and transferred sick time into vacation days, an additional $4,100 loss for Northampton, the documents say. Townsend is expected to surrender today on charges of felony theft and other offenses, Bucks County District Attorney Diane Gibbons said.
NEWS
April 25, 2013
Cheers to the Nutter administration's civil lawsuit against former Sheriff John Green and the vendors he allowed to operate with impunity. The city has asked for an accounting of more than $115 million, as well as a "return of all ill-gotten gains established by that accounting. " The lawsuit should send a message to contractors that Philadelphia taxpayers won't stand for being ripped off. The outrage at the city Sheriff's Office began with bad public policy. Green allowed two private companies, Reach Communications Specialists and RCS Searchers Inc., to perform public services, and to do so in the shadows, shielded from any semblance of accountability.
NEWS
October 27, 2010 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The former head of La Salle University's food services was charged Tuesday with stealing $5 million from the school in a scheme dating back 20 years. Stephen Greb, 58, surrendered Tuesday morning at the District Attorney's Office to face theft, forgery, and other charges. The university discovered that the money was missing this summer and fired Greb, an employee for 26 years. The two sides have since reached a restitution agreement, with the university making a "substantial recovery" of the lost funds, according to a La Salle statement.
NEWS
December 16, 2005 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A seasoned war veteran, the major was nevertheless caught completely by surprise yesterday - by a force of 4-year-olds. Just one day after an emotional reunion with her husband and two young daughters after a year in Iraq and Kuwait, Army Reserve Maj. Denise Wurzbach was doing what she'd done every weekday before being sent overseas: taking her oldest daughter to preschool. But unbeknownst to the major, her arrival at 10 a.m. yesterday would be marked by a chilled, squirmy but determined band of children outside the Goddard School in Blue Bell.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1991 | By Linda S. Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
L. Murphy Smith, a college professor, is out to change the way people feel about their accountants. If accountants "are on a television show or in a movie, we are usually the geek who gets killed," Smith laments. "Many people have the wrong impression about the accounting profession, including accounting students. " People think, for example, that accountants are mere number-crunchers who lead boring lives, says Smith, a professor who teaches accounting at Texas A & M University in College Station.
NEWS
May 4, 2006 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After 12 days of testimony and eagerness to take the stand in his own defense, a Fort Washington accountant charged with embezzling $10.8 million from a gun manufacturer surprised prosecutors yesterday by entering a guilty plea. Denis I. Shusterman, 44, admitted to 51 counts of embezzlement, tax evasion, filing false tax returns, perjury, and fraud in the handling of his bankruptcy and a mortgage. Shusterman declined comment on why he changed his plea to guilty. But his lawyer, Elliot Cohen, said, "We did everything we could.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 25, 2013
Cheers to the Nutter administration's civil lawsuit against former Sheriff John Green and the vendors he allowed to operate with impunity. The city has asked for an accounting of more than $115 million, as well as a "return of all ill-gotten gains established by that accounting. " The lawsuit should send a message to contractors that Philadelphia taxpayers won't stand for being ripped off. The outrage at the city Sheriff's Office began with bad public policy. Green allowed two private companies, Reach Communications Specialists and RCS Searchers Inc., to perform public services, and to do so in the shadows, shielded from any semblance of accountability.
NEWS
November 16, 2012
Ellis Levin, 65, of Cinnaminson and Brant Beach, N.J., a forensic accountant who worked on many major fraud investigations and audited institutions ranging from schools to international chemical giants, died Wednesday, Nov. 14, just weeks after learning he had an aggressive form of cancer. In the arcane world of accounting irregularities and audit failures, Mr. Levin was widely considered a whiz, driven by a passion to "get at the truth," as his family put it. Since graduating from the University of South Florida in 1969, he had practiced public accounting and, in the last 20 years, forensic accounting and litigation consulting.
NEWS
January 12, 2011 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former La Salle University administrator pleaded guilty Tuesday to theft, forgery, and related offenses for embezzling $5 million from the school. Stephen Greb, 58, of Blue Bell, oversaw the university's food services from 1984, when he was hired, until he was fired in June after his scheme was uncovered by La Salle. Greb created a fictitious food vendor called Sunshine Foods and then authorized payments to that vendor as far back as 1990, officials said. The university conducted an internal investigation with the help of a forensic accountant after La Salle officials questioned a $40,000 payment to Sunshine.
NEWS
November 9, 2010 | By WILLIAM BENDER, benderw@phillynews.com 215-854-5255
When the former vice president of the Penn-Delco School Board was slapped with an embezzlement rap in May 2009, he hired a forensic accountant to whip up a report that he hoped would convince detectives that he hadn't ripped off the high school's booster club. John Green might have even thought it had worked when Delaware County authorities dropped the theft charges in February. Turns out they just needed time to chase down all the new leads in his report. Yesterday, county District Attorney G. Michael Green (no relation to the defendant)
NEWS
October 27, 2010 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The former head of La Salle University's food services was charged Tuesday with stealing $5 million from the school in a scheme dating back 20 years. Stephen Greb, 58, surrendered Tuesday morning at the District Attorney's Office to face theft, forgery, and other charges. The university discovered that the money was missing this summer and fired Greb, an employee for 26 years. The two sides have since reached a restitution agreement, with the university making a "substantial recovery" of the lost funds, according to a La Salle statement.
NEWS
February 1, 2007 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The longtime manager of Northampton Township was charged yesterday with stealing more than $67,000 from the Bucks County municipality. D. Bruce Townsend, 55, is accused of using township credit cards to buy personal items ranging from groceries and videos to computer equipment and hotel rooms. Those thefts, which allegedly began in late 2001 and continued through last year, totaled more than $58,000, according to a criminal complaint. He also stole more than $4,900 in petty cash, and transferred sick time into vacation days, an additional $4,100 loss for Northampton, the documents say. Townsend is expected to surrender today on charges of felony theft and other offenses, Bucks County District Attorney Diane Gibbons said.
NEWS
May 4, 2006 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After 12 days of testimony and eagerness to take the stand in his own defense, a Fort Washington accountant charged with embezzling $10.8 million from a gun manufacturer surprised prosecutors yesterday by entering a guilty plea. Denis I. Shusterman, 44, admitted to 51 counts of embezzlement, tax evasion, filing false tax returns, perjury, and fraud in the handling of his bankruptcy and a mortgage. Shusterman declined comment on why he changed his plea to guilty. But his lawyer, Elliot Cohen, said, "We did everything we could.
NEWS
December 16, 2005 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A seasoned war veteran, the major was nevertheless caught completely by surprise yesterday - by a force of 4-year-olds. Just one day after an emotional reunion with her husband and two young daughters after a year in Iraq and Kuwait, Army Reserve Maj. Denise Wurzbach was doing what she'd done every weekday before being sent overseas: taking her oldest daughter to preschool. But unbeknownst to the major, her arrival at 10 a.m. yesterday would be marked by a chilled, squirmy but determined band of children outside the Goddard School in Blue Bell.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1995 | By Julie Stoiber, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At cocktail parties, Howard M. Silverstone gives one of two answers when asked what he does for a living. If he's bored and cranky and doesn't want to be there, he says he's an accountant. Whereupon the person trying to break the ice makes a break for the hors d'oeuvre table instead. If he's having fun, and is keen to mingle, he says what he really does for a living: forensic accounting. Although most people initially misunderstand his profession, and ask if it means that he does tax returns for dead people, they certainly do want to hear more.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1991 | By Linda S. Wallace, Inquirer Staff Writer
L. Murphy Smith, a college professor, is out to change the way people feel about their accountants. If accountants "are on a television show or in a movie, we are usually the geek who gets killed," Smith laments. "Many people have the wrong impression about the accounting profession, including accounting students. " People think, for example, that accountants are mere number-crunchers who lead boring lives, says Smith, a professor who teaches accounting at Texas A & M University in College Station.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|