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Forest Management

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NEWS
July 19, 1999 | By Oshrat Carmiel, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
An environmental expert has told the township that it needs better ordinances if it hopes to protect its forests. Officials have felt that way ever since March, when developer Charles Sturges of Heritage Building Group announced plans to cut 60 acres of trees from his 300-acre farm, which sits on a ledge above River Road. Most of the farm lies in neighboring Plumstead, and his timber plan is being challenged under that township's forest-management ordinance. But Solebury officials wanted to find out whether they could challenge the plan on their own. In a report submitted to the township last week, forestry expert Leslie Jones Sauer, of Andropogon Associates in Philadelphia, suggested they cannot.
NEWS
May 23, 2000 | By David W. Riggs and Daniel R. Simmons
Do you like to play with matches? Does fire fascinate you? If so, maybe you ought to apply for a job with the Park Service or the Forest Service. You may not be aware that the recent wildfire in Los Alamos, N.M., is a predictable result of federal forest management and a harbinger of things to come. Federal forest management has allowed dead and dying amounts of wood to accumulate in forests, increasing the likelihood of severe fires, threatening the lives and property of people that live near the forest and damaging the ecological health of forests.
NEWS
August 8, 2003 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Under the state's first new forest-management plan in almost 20 years, the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources would end new shallow-well gas drilling and limit timber harvesting on hundreds of thousands of acres of state forest. The proposal, which covers huge swaths of forest that stretch across the north-center of the commonwealth, marks a shift in the state's approach to managing its 2.1 million acres of forestland. A little more than a year ago, the Schweiker administration proposed opening one quarter of that forestland to deep-well gas drilling, which still will be allowed under the new plan.
NEWS
December 8, 2002
America's forests are open for business. The Bush administration last week proposed new rules to manage 192 million acres of federal forests and grasslands to "better harmonize the environmental, social and economic benefits" of the land. That's code for making it easier to log, drill and mine. A throwback to the profligate 19th century, the new rules allow local land managers to designate areas of our shared public land for logging or other uses - without first studying the effect on wildlife, watersheds or public recreation.
NEWS
June 24, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Firefighters frantically battled to save an Arizona mountain town yesterday as two fierce forest blazes converged into the largest wildfire in the state's history. The fires, which have driven thousands of people from their homes and drawn angry criticism of the federal government's forest management policy, have charred nearly 300,000 acres . About 1,700 firefighters used bulldozers to build a new fireline on the eastern flank of the Rodeo fire in a bid to save the town of Show Low, a community of 7,500 about 150 miles northeast of Phoenix.
NEWS
August 27, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
For 15 years, certified forester Bob Williams watched over 5,000 acres of woodlands and wetlands in Atlantic County's Estell Manor. He thinned trees, conducted controlled burns, and planted and fenced seedlings of the increasingly threatened Atlantic white cedar. When the Christie administration bought the land from Lenape Farms Inc. eight months ago, Williams and the landowners who hired him were lauded by state officials for encouraging forest regeneration, reducing wildfire hazards, and protecting wildlife.
NEWS
October 25, 1999 | By Steven Conn
It is a nice irony of history that the century should close with politicians at all levels scrambling to do something about suburban sprawl, whatever that something might prove to be. While the issue seems to have sprung up on the political landscape as fast as a strip mall in Chester County, in fact, the century began with similar concerns. When Teddy Roosevelt wound up occupying the White House after the assassination of William McKinley in 1901, he brought to the Oval Office an appreciation of this country's landscape and natural resources that had never been there before.
NEWS
April 9, 1995 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The wildfire's fury was written, high and low, on charred tree trunks, lifeless black spines on the back of a landscape into which Howard P. Boyd, a naturalist, stepped Thursday, west of Route 539. Nothing, it seemed, had survived. Here, unlike some other areas swept Tuesday and Wednesday by the 20,000- acre fire, there were no defiant green treetops. To their tips, the charcoal trunks of pitch pine and oak trees stood naked. Everywhere Boyd stepped, his shoes raised little gray clouds of ash. It was the same across the highway, where a wall of orange flame, driven by wind gusts up to 60 miles an hour, had exploded through the woods.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | By David Lee Preston, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Majestic and alone, it stands unmarked off Kings Highway at Hopkins Lane in Haddonfield. Beneath it sprawls the landscaped campus of The Bancroft School for developmentally disabled students. Every day, without giving it much thought, drivers tool past it and park in the lot below. It was there before the students, before the teachers, before the parking lot, before automobiles - even before the birth of Margaret Bancroft, who founded the school in 1883. Surely it was there when the nation was born.
NEWS
June 6, 1992 | By Douglas Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pity the poor pine looper moth, denizen of New Jersey forests. It is but an inch and a half long, but it has been the subject of an anxious state news release and suggestions that it be poisoned by spraying. There is a reason for the poor publicity, misplaced though it may be. The ubiquitous moth, whose adults are now to be found in some Pine Barrens groves as thick as wet snowflakes in a heavy storm, produces a particularly voracious caterpillar that last autumn severely defoliated 90,000 acres of pines between Chatsworth and the Shore.
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NEWS
August 27, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
For 15 years, certified forester Bob Williams watched over 5,000 acres of woodlands and wetlands in Atlantic County's Estell Manor. He thinned trees, conducted controlled burns, and planted and fenced seedlings of the increasingly threatened Atlantic white cedar. When the Christie administration bought the land from Lenape Farms Inc. eight months ago, Williams and the landowners who hired him were lauded by state officials for encouraging forest regeneration, reducing wildfire hazards, and protecting wildlife.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chuck Leavell is feeling great. Tuesday's Rolling Stones concert was so fine. Friday's is coming up. And Leavell, the band's keyboard player for 31 years, is loving it all. But for now, a brief breather on a sunny afternoon, he's talking trees. That's his other life, his twin passion. He has a 2,500-acre Georgia forest plantation near Macon, and he has become a staunch advocate for the idea that using the nation's trees is what will save them. It will help people recognize their value.
NEWS
July 7, 2012 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The devastation from the forest fires was unlike any in New Jersey since record-keeping began in 1906. Miles of woodland were blackened - 183,000 acres in Burlington, Camden, Gloucester, Ocean, Atlantic, Hunterdon, Somerset, and Middlesex Counties. Nearly 400 homes and buildings were reduced to ashes and seven people were killed in wind-driven fires over three days in April 1963. The blaze was never forgotten by New Jersey officials, who have been reminded of it again by deadly wildfires in Colorado and are working to improve management of nearly two million acres of state-owned or -supervised forests to avoid a similar disaster.
NEWS
July 14, 2004
You can't uncut a tree or undrill a well. Sure, there's restoration and replanting, and in time, nature will reclaim its own. But it's never the same. Wilderness, once despoiled, is lost for generations. But that's the gamble the Bush administration is willing to take in turning over America's remaining 60 million acres of roadless national forest to state governors for management. To ensure consistency, the Clinton administration in 2001 placed the protection of these forests squarely in the hands of the federal government, but under Bush's plan individual governors will recommend whether to log, drill, build, or conserve.
NEWS
August 8, 2003 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Under the state's first new forest-management plan in almost 20 years, the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources would end new shallow-well gas drilling and limit timber harvesting on hundreds of thousands of acres of state forest. The proposal, which covers huge swaths of forest that stretch across the north-center of the commonwealth, marks a shift in the state's approach to managing its 2.1 million acres of forestland. A little more than a year ago, the Schweiker administration proposed opening one quarter of that forestland to deep-well gas drilling, which still will be allowed under the new plan.
NEWS
December 8, 2002
America's forests are open for business. The Bush administration last week proposed new rules to manage 192 million acres of federal forests and grasslands to "better harmonize the environmental, social and economic benefits" of the land. That's code for making it easier to log, drill and mine. A throwback to the profligate 19th century, the new rules allow local land managers to designate areas of our shared public land for logging or other uses - without first studying the effect on wildlife, watersheds or public recreation.
NEWS
November 15, 2002 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the employees at the U.S. Forest Service lab here, the scariest moment might not have been when their building went up in flames before dawn. That occurred a few weeks later, when a radical environmental group took credit for the fire with an anonymous "communique" posted on the Internet. "While innocent life will never be harmed in any action we undertake, where it is necessary, we will no longer hesitate to pick up the gun to implement justice," said the statement, from a group called the Earth Liberation Front (ELF)
NEWS
June 24, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Firefighters frantically battled to save an Arizona mountain town yesterday as two fierce forest blazes converged into the largest wildfire in the state's history. The fires, which have driven thousands of people from their homes and drawn angry criticism of the federal government's forest management policy, have charred nearly 300,000 acres . About 1,700 firefighters used bulldozers to build a new fireline on the eastern flank of the Rodeo fire in a bid to save the town of Show Low, a community of 7,500 about 150 miles northeast of Phoenix.
NEWS
May 23, 2000 | By David W. Riggs and Daniel R. Simmons
Do you like to play with matches? Does fire fascinate you? If so, maybe you ought to apply for a job with the Park Service or the Forest Service. You may not be aware that the recent wildfire in Los Alamos, N.M., is a predictable result of federal forest management and a harbinger of things to come. Federal forest management has allowed dead and dying amounts of wood to accumulate in forests, increasing the likelihood of severe fires, threatening the lives and property of people that live near the forest and damaging the ecological health of forests.
NEWS
October 25, 1999 | By Steven Conn
It is a nice irony of history that the century should close with politicians at all levels scrambling to do something about suburban sprawl, whatever that something might prove to be. While the issue seems to have sprung up on the political landscape as fast as a strip mall in Chester County, in fact, the century began with similar concerns. When Teddy Roosevelt wound up occupying the White House after the assassination of William McKinley in 1901, he brought to the Oval Office an appreciation of this country's landscape and natural resources that had never been there before.
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