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Forestry

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NEWS
September 28, 2001 | By Will Van Sant INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
New Jersey forestry officials are completing a study of an incurable insect-borne disease that is killing the northern red oak, the state tree, and has spread to other species throughout the region. Bacterial leaf scorch first turned up in the state in Moorestown, Burlington County, in the late 1980s. The scourge, which some fear could prove as destructive as Dutch elm disease was a decade ago, is now widespread among oaks in South Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania - and is on the move.
NEWS
June 16, 1999 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Hamilton Squires Thompson, 83, of Worcester Township, who had an unusual military assignment before he became a builder and a teacher, died Saturday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania of respiratory failure. He had resided in the township since 1950, the last five years at the Meadowood at Worcester retirement community. Mr. Thompson, who studied forestry in college, spent a year in Linz, Austria, as an agricultural inspector with Army occupation forces after World War II. During the war, he served with Gen. George Patton's Third Army.
NEWS
June 2, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nicholas Muhlenberg, 81, a University of Pennsylvania professor from 1963 to 1992, died of a heart attack last Tuesday at the Watermark at Logan Square, the retirement community where he lived. Born in West Reading, Pa., he earned his bachelor's degree in forestry from the University of Michigan in 1949 and his master's in forestry there in 1952. Following study on a Fulbright scholarship in New Zealand in the 1952-53 school year, his daughter Mimi said, he earned a master's in conservation from Yale University in 1957 and a doctorate in resource economics there in 1959.
NEWS
November 5, 1992 | By Karen McAllister, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It may be a suburban resident irate over deer running rampant in the neighborhood, or a township official fearful that insects are destroying fauna, or a county park ranger alarmed that forests are losing their density. Whatever the problem, they turn to Amy Griffith for solutions. Griffith, 41, was recently appointed Valley Forge District forester for the state's Bureau of Forestry. As such, she oversees woodland in seven Southeastern Pennsylvania counties, including Chester, Montgomery and Delaware.
NEWS
May 8, 2010
A firefighting task force is on the scene Saturday of a raging forest fire in Burlington County near a housing development. Firefighters are struggling to bring it under control. The forest fire is near Route 70 and Lakehurst Road in Pemberton, and the first 911 call came in around 12:51 p.m., said an emergency dispatch supervisor for the county. The fire is on the perimeter of the Country Lakes housing development, though there had not yet been a call for evacations, the dispatcher said.
SPORTS
August 9, 1999 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
Menifee was the horse that should have won the Kentucky Derby, could have won the Preakness and couldn't be found in the Belmont Stakes. The second 3-year-old season began yesterday and Menifee was found in the winner's circle at Monmouth Park. The colt had won the $1 million Haskell Invitational, beating Cat Thief, the horse he always beats, and Forestry, the horse that brought $1.5 million to Menifee's $35,000 at the yearling sales. The 33,056 fans at the track and bettors at simulcast outlets around the country leaned toward Forestry until just before post time.
NEWS
May 29, 2011 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Professional forester Bob Williams knows quite a bit about growing trees. But making movies? Not so much - until he produced A Working Forest with the help of a family-run film and video company in Atlantic County and a friend who plays with the Rolling Stones. About that, more in a moment. Let's just say rock as well as roots are involved in this new DVD ( http://aworkingforest.com ), which makes a case for utilizing, as well as protecting, the woods. "I got the idea that a documentary would be a powerful tool for the forestry community," says Williams, a vice president at Land Dimensions Engineering in Glassboro.
NEWS
August 30, 1995 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The giant, whirling saw blade sang like a tenor as it sliced through a fresh-cut log of Atlantic white cedar. As wood fibers flew into the air like feathers from a pillow, a warm breeze passed through the open doors at both ends of the Schairer Brothers Sawmill, dusting the room with the smell of a giant cigar box. That sound, that smell: They have lingered in the air here since 1936, when the Schairer family began milling cedar from Pine...
NEWS
April 21, 1996 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Children will be able to play soccer here on new fields to be built on open space behind Bryn Mawr Rehab, perhaps by fall. And the ecologically sensitive serpentine barrens, which run the length of the new fields, will be safe from the pounding of cleated feet. Thus ends a yearlong dispute between a local youth organization and county and state environmentalists. The reason for the dispute: a rare serpentine rock formation known as the Sugartown Serpentine Barrens that is home to an imperiled species of plants.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Omund A. "Seg" Seglem, 81, who helped design wartime coastal defenses and retired as an executive of a Bucks County manufacturing company, died Sunday at the Normandy Farms retirement community in Blue Bell. Mr. Seglem was born in Duluth, Minn., and graduated from Denfeld High School. He earned his bachelor's degree in engineering and forestry from the University of Minnesota in 1938, then worked for the U.S. Forestry Service for three years. During World War II, he was a captain with the Army Corps of Engineers.
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NEWS
May 29, 2011 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Professional forester Bob Williams knows quite a bit about growing trees. But making movies? Not so much - until he produced A Working Forest with the help of a family-run film and video company in Atlantic County and a friend who plays with the Rolling Stones. About that, more in a moment. Let's just say rock as well as roots are involved in this new DVD ( http://aworkingforest.com ), which makes a case for utilizing, as well as protecting, the woods. "I got the idea that a documentary would be a powerful tool for the forestry community," says Williams, a vice president at Land Dimensions Engineering in Glassboro.
NEWS
May 8, 2010
A firefighting task force is on the scene Saturday of a raging forest fire in Burlington County near a housing development. Firefighters are struggling to bring it under control. The forest fire is near Route 70 and Lakehurst Road in Pemberton, and the first 911 call came in around 12:51 p.m., said an emergency dispatch supervisor for the county. The fire is on the perimeter of the Country Lakes housing development, though there had not yet been a call for evacations, the dispatcher said.
NEWS
October 18, 2009 | By Beth D'Addono FOR THE INQUIRER
Driving north on leafy Route 209 along a section of the Delaware River that dips into the 70,000-acre Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, it's easy to see why Gifford Pinchot was passionate about conservation. The two-time Pennsylvania governor, who is credited with starting the U.S. Forest Service in 1905, spent most of his life surrounded by these woods, fly-fishing on the river and trekking along the steep bluffs of Pennsylvania bluestone that surround this Pike County seat.
NEWS
June 2, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nicholas Muhlenberg, 81, a University of Pennsylvania professor from 1963 to 1992, died of a heart attack last Tuesday at the Watermark at Logan Square, the retirement community where he lived. Born in West Reading, Pa., he earned his bachelor's degree in forestry from the University of Michigan in 1949 and his master's in forestry there in 1952. Following study on a Fulbright scholarship in New Zealand in the 1952-53 school year, his daughter Mimi said, he earned a master's in conservation from Yale University in 1957 and a doctorate in resource economics there in 1959.
NEWS
May 8, 2008 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you're an oak tree, gypsy moth caterpillars are coming to get you. Right now. And so the Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry plans to spray 200 Chester County acres against the caterpillars, as part of a state effort across 221,831 acres in 27 counties. The spraying was expected to start this week, depending mostly on weather. Four blocks of land, which 44 neighbors have put together, will be sprayed here. In North Coventry, a 74-acre block is off Chestnut Hill Road near Fawn Lane and a 52-acre block is off Cold Spring Road, but near no cross street.
NEWS
September 28, 2001 | By Will Van Sant INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
New Jersey forestry officials are completing a study of an incurable insect-borne disease that is killing the northern red oak, the state tree, and has spread to other species throughout the region. Bacterial leaf scorch first turned up in the state in Moorestown, Burlington County, in the late 1980s. The scourge, which some fear could prove as destructive as Dutch elm disease was a decade ago, is now widespread among oaks in South Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania - and is on the move.
NEWS
May 22, 2001 | By Mark Jaffe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every day, a trickle of tropical timber flows into American ports. For years, it consisted mainly of raw wood, such as mahogany for fine furniture. Now, that trickle is turning into a flood, as timber from the world's tropical forests is entering the United States in a new form - inexpensive furniture, paneling and other finished products from Asia. The United States used to play a minor role in the tropical-wood trade. That is changing with the rise of finished-wood imports.
NEWS
May 20, 2001 | By Mark Jaffe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The world's beleaguered tropical rain forests - a band of woodland covering just six percent of the planet but holding two-thirds of its species - face a new threat: Asian commercial logging. Fueled by a growing economy at home and falling trade barriers abroad, big Asian timber companies have fanned out across the globe. Here, on South America's eastern coast, trucks piled high with logs come rumbling out of the rain forest almost daily on the first leg of a voyage halfway around the world - to China.
SPORTS
August 9, 1999 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
Menifee was the horse that should have won the Kentucky Derby, could have won the Preakness and couldn't be found in the Belmont Stakes. The second 3-year-old season began yesterday and Menifee was found in the winner's circle at Monmouth Park. The colt had won the $1 million Haskell Invitational, beating Cat Thief, the horse he always beats, and Forestry, the horse that brought $1.5 million to Menifee's $35,000 at the yearling sales. The 33,056 fans at the track and bettors at simulcast outlets around the country leaned toward Forestry until just before post time.
NEWS
June 16, 1999 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Hamilton Squires Thompson, 83, of Worcester Township, who had an unusual military assignment before he became a builder and a teacher, died Saturday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania of respiratory failure. He had resided in the township since 1950, the last five years at the Meadowood at Worcester retirement community. Mr. Thompson, who studied forestry in college, spent a year in Linz, Austria, as an agricultural inspector with Army occupation forces after World War II. During the war, he served with Gen. George Patton's Third Army.
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