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BUSINESS
May 30, 2010
"I was wrong. " - President Obama, on earlier believing that oil companies were prepared to deal with a worst-case offshore spill "The impact of a higher unemployment rate for Americans ages 16 to 24 could have a lasting effect on lifetime earnings and attitudes toward risk and social policies. " - economist Joe Peek "Shopping trips are down. Consumers are incredibly price-sensitive. " - Campbell Soup Co. chief executive officer Douglas R. Conant, noting the company's quarterly decline in market share for canned soup "We have to fight this explosion of gambling all around us. " - Don Marrandino, a regional president of Harrah's Entertainment Inc., owner of four Atlantic City casinos, on the growth of competition "I'm worried still about the risk of a double dip. " - economist Robert Shiller, on recession fears "Forests are worth more dead than alive.
NEWS
October 30, 2011 | By Jamie Stengle, Associated Press
DALLAS - Pockets of brown, sickly trees mar the traditionally majestic pine woods in East Texas. Leafless oaks can be seen across the state. Even native drought-resistant cedars are dying off in some areas after proliferating during the last century. These are the effects of a historic dry spell that is forecast to grip Texas well into 2012 and could alter the state's landscape for years. Already, extreme heat and the lack of rain have taken a brutal toll on forests and city parks.
NEWS
June 26, 1986
"God is here," said the rabbi in his yellow knee boots. A group of us were on Ridenour Overlook amidst the mountains about Raystown Lake, west of Harrisburg. The sky was brilliant blue, air crystal clear, the lake's water sparkling and the mountains mostly green. After admiring the awesome scenery carefully, flaws appeared. One tree in 10 at the 2,000-foot mountains was completely dead. At the 1,000-foot level, every other tree had one-tenth of its branches dead and stands of trees were turning brown.
NEWS
February 15, 1987 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than one million plants and animals - about one quarter of the world's species - will vanish in the next 30 years because of the destruction of tropical forests, a Missouri biologist said last night. Peter H. Raven, professor of botany at Washington University in St. Louis, said an average of 100 species a day would become extinct because of the destruction of 80,000 square miles of forests a year - an area roughly the size of Kansas. In addition, he said that 2.2 million species, almost half of the world's estimated 4.5 million plants and animals, are at risk because of the destruction of forests through logging, farming, searching for firewood and other human activities.
NEWS
December 27, 2011 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Both sides agree: New Jersey's sprawling public and private forests face serious challenges and must be better managed. The woodlands are under attack from insects, disease, invasive plant species, fires, and herds of deer feeding on new growth. But conservationists, ecologists, certified foresters, scientists, and politicians don't agree on how to address the problems. They are on both sides of a controversial state legislative measure - likely to be voted on in Trenton next month - that would inventory the woodlands and permit commercial tree-cutting on public land as well as the sale of wood as a way of paying for the program.
NEWS
January 27, 1988 | By John M. Skelly
Mother Nature took thousands of years to develop the forests that blanket much of the United States. By the same token, it may take individual trees years to die from the gradual effects of damage or disease. But the federal government may begin basing long-term decisions about combating the effects of acid precipitation on the results of relatively short-term research studies. This approach, coupled with the emotionalism surrounding the issue, will not produce the satisfactory answers we need to save our forests, lakes and streams.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 1,486 acres of Pennsylvania state forest land has been converted to roads, pipelines, and well pads for Marcellus Shale natural gas development, according to a state monitoring report that will be released Wednesday. Drilling companies have upgraded or constructed 161 miles of roads in state forests, including 30 miles of new roads. They also have cut 104 miles of pipeline corridors in the forests. The 265-page monitoring report, prepared by the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR)
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | By Jesse Smith, WASHINGTON POST
‘This really feels like t he middle of nowhere," I said to my partner.   Rob and I were driving along the road to Cherry Springs State Park in north-central Pennsylvania. We were in "God's Country," as Potter County calls itself. Dense forests surrounded us. Every so often, we would pass a hunting cabin, closed for the season. But we saw few other signs of life — human life, that is. Trees and wildflowers lined the road; butterflies and birds flitted between them.
NEWS
December 8, 2009 | By D. Andrew Pitz
World leaders are convening in Copenhagen to discuss climate change this week, and a Senate committee recently heard testimony from economists on how federal climate legislation might affect jobs and the economy. The stakes for Pennsylvania in this debate are high. Moving states with a history of heavy industry toward a new "green" economy is imperative. But reducing our dependence on fossil fuels is only one part of the story. Forest loss and degradation cause the release of the carbon stored in wood in the form of carbon dioxide.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2010 | Compiled from The Inquirer, Associated Press, Bloomberg News
"I was wrong. " - President Obama, on earlier believing that oil companies were prepared to deal with a worst-case offshore spill "The impact of a higher unemployment rate for Americans ages 16 to 24 could have a lasting effect on lifetime earnings and attitudes toward risk and social policies. " - economist Joe Peek "Shopping trips are down. Consumers are incredibly price-sensitive. " - Campbell Soup Co. chief executive officer Douglas R. Conant, noting the company's quarterly decline in market share for canned soup "We have to fight this explosion of gambling all around us. " - Don Marrandino, a regional president of Harrah's Entertainment Inc., owner of four Atlantic City casinos, on the growth of competition "I'm worried still about the risk of a double dip. " - economist Robert Shiller, on recession fears "Forests are worth more dead than alive.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 16, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
The artist Ann Hamilton once took over the enormous drill hall in New York's Park Avenue Armory and turned it into a room-sized loom, powered by people on swings. The piece, the event of a thread , delved into the complex and fragile connections between human beings who find themselves thrown together in a common space. It was so popular the lines wound around the block. Hamilton has now commandeered a similarly gargantuan room in Philadelphia, in the underused Pier 9 warehouse on the Delaware River, for her latest interactive art installation.
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
With officials in Avalon, N.J., refusing to abort plans to cut down more than 100 Japanese black pine trees in the borough's 40-block dune forest, which they say are infested with a deadly beetle, a resident skeptical that the pines are dying is taking the issue to the federal level. Martha Wright, 60, has submitted three complaints over the last month to the Government Accountability Office alleging that by accepting a federally funded grant of $24,000 from the state to remove the trees, Avalon is committing fraud and mismanaging federal funds.
NEWS
June 24, 2016
Residents were being evacuated in advance of a forest fire Wednesday afternoon in Burlington County, police said. Homes were threatened in the Browns Mills section of Pemberton Township, in the area of Juliustown and Pemberton-Browns Mills Roads, police said. No injuries were reported. Pemberton-Browns Mills Road between Juliustown and Springfield Roads was closed. The fire was reported around 2:30 on the edge of Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst. - Robert Moran
NEWS
May 3, 2016
ISSUE | FOREST TRAILS Help on the way? The National Forest System Trails Stewardship Act (House Bill 845) would address the growing backlog of maintenance needed in our national forests. If passed, this legislation would keep more trails open and accessible by expanding the use of volunteers and partner organizations - a wonderful solution to a persistent problem. Democrats and Republicans in Washington don't agree on much, but they agree that this bipartisan bill would do a lot of good.
NEWS
April 1, 2016 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
Police said a South Jersey man has been arrested for allegedly setting more than 20 brushfires over the last two years. Dennis Casario, 62, was apprehended after New Jersey Forest Fire Service officials saw him pull over on Beebetown Road in Winslow on Tuesday, start a fire in the brush, and leave the scene, Winslow Township police said. Authorities had been conducting surveillance in the area after multiple forest fires were deliberately set there over the last several weeks, police said.
TRAVEL
March 7, 2016 | By Carol Ann Davidson, TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE
'There he is," said Juan Jose, pointing to the young sloth on a tree near the entrance to Nayara Springs. Not wanting to see a sloth is akin to not wanting to go zip-lining in Costa Rica. I had declined the vertiginous sport, but am thrilled to gaze upon that little guy hanging on to that tree for dear life. Juan Jose is one of the most enthusiastic staff members any hotel could have - a true naturalist at heart. As a matter of fact, heart has everything to do with this ultimate romantic boutique hotel, tucked away near the town of La Fortuna, steeped in the rain forest, and within sight of the one of the world's most active volcanos, Arenal.
NEWS
February 8, 2016
DANTE'S JOURNEY into the netherworld starts with these words "In the middle of our life's journey, I found myself in a dark wood. " And from that point on, with the wise guidance of Virgil, our hero plumbs the depths of hell, taking us on a journey through human sin, fallibility, sorrow and even love. I know how he felt. This Friday, I took my own journey into that dark forest, only it was a few blocks from the subway at Broad and Pattison, and my Virgil was my dear friend John (accompanied by his beautiful wife Masako.)
BUSINESS
February 3, 2016
In the Region Comcast gets Thursday NFL Comcast -owned NBC caught five NFL games on Thursday nights, splitting a 10-game package over the 2016 and 2017 seasons with CBS. The Thursday-night games aired on CBS or NBC also will be simulcast on the NFL Network and a digital platform, which will dilute viewership on any one media outlet. Media reports said NBC and CBS paid about $225 million each for the five games, or $450 million over two seasons. Employment center to open Opening ceremonies for a new employment center are set for 11 a.m. Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two years ago, some Irish citizens went ballistic over a proposal by their government to reduce the national debt by selling off some of the island nation's national forests to corporations. The plan was abandoned, but not before inspiring writer-director Corin Hardy to come up with the premise for his feature debut, The Hallow , a wonderfully entertaining horror yarn about a forest that rises up to defend itself from human encroachment. An eco-thriller heavily inspired by ancient Irish fables and pre-Christian religious imagery, The Hallow belongs to a tradition of offbeat horror out of Britain and Ireland that includes the 1973 classic The Wicker Man , from Robin Hardy (no relation to Corin)
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