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BUSINESS
May 30, 2010
"I was wrong. " - President Obama, on earlier believing that oil companies were prepared to deal with a worst-case offshore spill "The impact of a higher unemployment rate for Americans ages 16 to 24 could have a lasting effect on lifetime earnings and attitudes toward risk and social policies. " - economist Joe Peek "Shopping trips are down. Consumers are incredibly price-sensitive. " - Campbell Soup Co. chief executive officer Douglas R. Conant, noting the company's quarterly decline in market share for canned soup "We have to fight this explosion of gambling all around us. " - Don Marrandino, a regional president of Harrah's Entertainment Inc., owner of four Atlantic City casinos, on the growth of competition "I'm worried still about the risk of a double dip. " - economist Robert Shiller, on recession fears "Forests are worth more dead than alive.
NEWS
October 30, 2011 | By Jamie Stengle, Associated Press
DALLAS - Pockets of brown, sickly trees mar the traditionally majestic pine woods in East Texas. Leafless oaks can be seen across the state. Even native drought-resistant cedars are dying off in some areas after proliferating during the last century. These are the effects of a historic dry spell that is forecast to grip Texas well into 2012 and could alter the state's landscape for years. Already, extreme heat and the lack of rain have taken a brutal toll on forests and city parks.
NEWS
June 26, 1986
"God is here," said the rabbi in his yellow knee boots. A group of us were on Ridenour Overlook amidst the mountains about Raystown Lake, west of Harrisburg. The sky was brilliant blue, air crystal clear, the lake's water sparkling and the mountains mostly green. After admiring the awesome scenery carefully, flaws appeared. One tree in 10 at the 2,000-foot mountains was completely dead. At the 1,000-foot level, every other tree had one-tenth of its branches dead and stands of trees were turning brown.
NEWS
February 15, 1987 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than one million plants and animals - about one quarter of the world's species - will vanish in the next 30 years because of the destruction of tropical forests, a Missouri biologist said last night. Peter H. Raven, professor of botany at Washington University in St. Louis, said an average of 100 species a day would become extinct because of the destruction of 80,000 square miles of forests a year - an area roughly the size of Kansas. In addition, he said that 2.2 million species, almost half of the world's estimated 4.5 million plants and animals, are at risk because of the destruction of forests through logging, farming, searching for firewood and other human activities.
NEWS
December 27, 2011 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Both sides agree: New Jersey's sprawling public and private forests face serious challenges and must be better managed. The woodlands are under attack from insects, disease, invasive plant species, fires, and herds of deer feeding on new growth. But conservationists, ecologists, certified foresters, scientists, and politicians don't agree on how to address the problems. They are on both sides of a controversial state legislative measure - likely to be voted on in Trenton next month - that would inventory the woodlands and permit commercial tree-cutting on public land as well as the sale of wood as a way of paying for the program.
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | By Jesse Smith, WASHINGTON POST
‘This really feels like t he middle of nowhere," I said to my partner.   Rob and I were driving along the road to Cherry Springs State Park in north-central Pennsylvania. We were in "God's Country," as Potter County calls itself. Dense forests surrounded us. Every so often, we would pass a hunting cabin, closed for the season. But we saw few other signs of life — human life, that is. Trees and wildflowers lined the road; butterflies and birds flitted between them.
NEWS
January 27, 1988 | By John M. Skelly
Mother Nature took thousands of years to develop the forests that blanket much of the United States. By the same token, it may take individual trees years to die from the gradual effects of damage or disease. But the federal government may begin basing long-term decisions about combating the effects of acid precipitation on the results of relatively short-term research studies. This approach, coupled with the emotionalism surrounding the issue, will not produce the satisfactory answers we need to save our forests, lakes and streams.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 1,486 acres of Pennsylvania state forest land has been converted to roads, pipelines, and well pads for Marcellus Shale natural gas development, according to a state monitoring report that will be released Wednesday. Drilling companies have upgraded or constructed 161 miles of roads in state forests, including 30 miles of new roads. They also have cut 104 miles of pipeline corridors in the forests. The 265-page monitoring report, prepared by the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR)
NEWS
December 8, 2009 | By D. Andrew Pitz
World leaders are convening in Copenhagen to discuss climate change this week, and a Senate committee recently heard testimony from economists on how federal climate legislation might affect jobs and the economy. The stakes for Pennsylvania in this debate are high. Moving states with a history of heavy industry toward a new "green" economy is imperative. But reducing our dependence on fossil fuels is only one part of the story. Forest loss and degradation cause the release of the carbon stored in wood in the form of carbon dioxide.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2010 | Compiled from The Inquirer, Associated Press, Bloomberg News
"I was wrong. " - President Obama, on earlier believing that oil companies were prepared to deal with a worst-case offshore spill "The impact of a higher unemployment rate for Americans ages 16 to 24 could have a lasting effect on lifetime earnings and attitudes toward risk and social policies. " - economist Joe Peek "Shopping trips are down. Consumers are incredibly price-sensitive. " - Campbell Soup Co. chief executive officer Douglas R. Conant, noting the company's quarterly decline in market share for canned soup "We have to fight this explosion of gambling all around us. " - Don Marrandino, a regional president of Harrah's Entertainment Inc., owner of four Atlantic City casinos, on the growth of competition "I'm worried still about the risk of a double dip. " - economist Robert Shiller, on recession fears "Forests are worth more dead than alive.
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NEWS
July 9, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
GALLOWAY TOWNSHIP, N.J. - The Pine Barrens surrounding Stockton University were choked with brush and a mix of trees - from white oaks and red maples to Virginia, pitch, and shortleaf pines. The conditions made for a sickly forest, vulnerable to wildfires and insect infestation, including the destructive southern pine beetle. But last week - following earlier prescribed burns to clear undergrowth - the woods along Vera King Farris Road began feeling more airy. The first of hundreds of trees came down, and sunlight again bathed the ground, making it possible for a healthier forest to take root next to the Atlantic County school.
NEWS
March 17, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
GALLOWAY TOWNSHIP, N.J. - George Zimmermann calls it a "living classroom. " Leaving PowerPoint presentations and books behind at Stockton University, the professor leads his students into the Pine Barrens that surround the Atlantic County school like a vast emerald ocean. They walk among shortleaf pines, white oaks, red maples, and Atlantic white cedars while taking up tough questions: How can they manage the forest's health? How can they protect it from fires, pathogens, and insects?
TRAVEL
March 15, 2015 | By Ranjan Mukherjee, For The Inquirer
The warning growl, a flash of orange, heightened tension in the air: A tiger is near! This is what I had imagined and wanted to experience. Mention tiger , and India comes to mind. So, a few years ago, my wife, son, and I decided to visit Ranthambhore, a onetime princely hunting ground turned tiger preserve 112 miles from Jaipur, the capital of Rajasthan state in western India. We stayed in a luxury tent, once used to accommodate guests during tiger hunts in the last century.
NEWS
February 17, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
WALKING through winter woods at the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, executive director Mike Weilbacher heard a few song notes high up in the bare trees and said: "That's a cardinal's mating song. The birds are dusting off their love songs, warming them up for spring. " A few minutes later, Weilbacher heard a woodpecker tapping out a drum solo in the Upper Roxborough forest on Hagy's Mill Road near Port Royal Avenue. "Woodpeckers are not great singers," he said, "but they are great percussionists.
NEWS
January 12, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
THERE IS a mystery deep in the Haddington Woods. Behind the Cobbs Creek bocce courts on Vine Street near Daggett, there are two forests, standing side by side, as different as night and day. One is the picture of good health - mature native trees towering toward the sun while a young generation of saplings flourishes beneath them. The neighboring forest is dying, strangled by a thick jungle of invasive vines, shrubs and trees. Why? "That's the $10,000 question," said Tom Witmer, director of natural resources for the city's Parks & Recreation Department.
NEWS
December 26, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Partly thanks to mankind's remarkable historical propensity for ignorance and violence, these are not our darkest days. But even if most of us are immeasurably better off than we were millennia or centuries ago, a passing familiarity with the strife on America's streets and depredations abroad can make the present day look dim. And in an astronomical sense, these are our very darkest days - of the year anyway. The long nights of early winter, with fleeting glimpses of sun and months of freezing ahead, are the literally dark days from which all metaphoric meanings of the phrase spring.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By Scott Sturgis, For The Inquirer
2015 Subaru Forester 2.0 XT Premium: Subaru shows its sporty side. Ish. Price: $28,495, as tested. No options on test vehicle. Marketer's pitch: "Confidence in motion. " Conventional wisdom: Edmunds.com likes the "roomy interior, admirable fuel economy, availability of a stout turbocharged engine, standard all-wheel drive, great safety scores, and available advanced safety features" but not the "finicky touch-screen interface; base engine is raucous at higher r.p.m. " Reality: The Forester may not do sporty all that well, but it still does Subaru well.
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Josh Siegel's path to an Eagle Scout badge winds through a pristine patch of Voorhees called Ashland Woods. The trail he's blazing, designing, and building will improve public access to nearly 20 densely forested, out-of-the-way acres off Evesham Road. Voorhees purchased and preserved Ashland Woods from development two years ago for $1.6 million, using township, county, and state funds. The land borders the John T. Hale Sr. Memorial Park and the Cooper River's south branch. "I like nature," Siegel, 16, says, explaining why he chose the woods for his project.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
There's much to enjoy in Alexander Burns' fun, frolicsome production of As You Like It . Burns' Quintessence Theatre Group starts its fifth season of contemporary stagings of classic works with a pair from the Bard in rotating rep ( Richard II opens Oct. 18), with an all-male cast tackling both plays. More on that anon. In Shakespeare's comedy, Duke Frederick (Paul Hebron) usurps the throne of his brother, Duke Senior, and banishes him to the Forest of Arden. Senior's daughter Rosalind (Alexander Harvey)
NEWS
September 30, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
PRICE TOWNSHIP, Pa. - State troopers perched on rocks and leaned on trees, eyes fixed on the dense woods in front of them. Police cruisers lined the unpaved roads. White vans, unmarked SUVs, and armored vehicles sat ready near a pond. The hunt for alleged state trooper killer Eric Frein was narrowed Sunday to a rural Snow Hill Falls neighborhood bordering a state forest in Monroe County, where residents were once again advised not to leave home. Police said the search for Frein, a self-styled survivalist who has evaded capture in the Poconos for more than two weeks, was centered on the neighborhood.
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