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Forgiveness

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NEWS
October 11, 2006 | By Elizabeth Eisenstadt-Evans
Students of Amish practice have said much recently about the stunning way in which the plain people incarnate the practice of forgiveness. As I watched that forgiveness in action, I wondered: Can a typcial Christian like me draw some meaning from this tragedy in ways that have everyday consequences? Can I learn from my brothers and sisters in Christ? If the Amish seem different, it is because in some ways, in their insularity and ascetic practice, they take the words of the New Testament more seriously than many of the vocal advocates for "family values" and cultural conservatism or liberal proponents of peace and social justice.
NEWS
October 2, 2011
L. Gregory Jones is professor of theology at Duke Divinity School, author of Embodying Forgiveness, and coauthor of Forgiving as We've Been Forgiven Five years ago, Charles Carl Roberts IV entered an Amish school in Nickel Mines, Pa., and shot 10 girls - mortally wounding five - before killing himself. This quiet, rural community in Lancaster County suddenly became a place of unprecedented contrasts - violence amid peaceful people, hordes of satellite trucks in a place that favors simplicity.
NEWS
February 3, 2002 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A crucified savior may have pleaded for it on behalf of his enemies, but not everybody has the power to overcome a grudge. Forgiveness is tough. "So many of the problems that people have when they come in for psychotherapy come out of real or imagined misdeeds that other people have committed against them," said Charles Zeiders, a psychologist and Christian counselor. On Saturday, Zeiders and colleagues Frances E. Schoeninger and Douglas Schoeninger will lead a daylong workshop designed to guide participants through the forgiveness process.
NEWS
April 19, 2005 | By Bill Tammeus
A few weeks ago, as the news pounded us with stories of vicious murders, I asked theologians, clergy, academics and others how our conscience gets formed. This was in the context of the killings of members of a judge's family in Chicago, a judge and others in an Atlanta courtroom, and 10 people, including the shooter, on the Red Lake Indian Reservation in Minnesota. This question seems to buzz around my head like a persistent horse fly: Is it possible to get beyond the reach of God's forgiveness?
NEWS
September 27, 1998 | By The Rev. R. Scott Rodin
Unique about the moral scandal in Washington is the confused, convoluted and often contradictory nature of the various religious voices we are hearing. Responses range from righteous indignation that seeks maximum retribution to an amnesia-laden support that can hardly imagine what all the fuss is about. The result is that the people in our pews are frustrated and perplexed. Our balanced Christian response must comprise three nonnegotiable points. The first is unreserved forgiveness.
LIVING
September 14, 1997 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Forgiveness does not come without accountability. " - The Rev. William Shaw, pastor of White Rock Baptist Church "We don't have a ministry of condemnation. " - The Rev. E.V. Hill, National Baptist ethics chairman He went to the annual meeting in Denver this month asking members of the nation's largest black church to forgive him for "errors," to pardon him for "mistakes. " The Rev. Henry Lyons, beleaguered president of the National Baptist Convention, U.S.A., admitted holding a female aide's money and church funds in the same account.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2008 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Playwright Bryony Lavery's intention in Interact Theatre's current production, Frozen, was to show the healing nature of forgiveness; she was "horrified" to find, after watching a documentary about a series of British child murders, that the children's parents were "frozen" in their grief, unable to move on with their lives. And so she invented Catharine Slusar's Agnetha, a psychiatrist studying neurological similarities in serial killers, Jeb Kreager's pedophiliac murderer Ralph, and Mary Martello's Nancy, the mother of one of Ralph's young victims.
NEWS
July 6, 2009
IT'S disturbing that columnist Ronnie Polaneczky can feel inclined to forgive Michael Jackson of the credible allegations of child molestation simply because he was a "brilliant" entertainer ("Is it possible . . . to appreciate the totality of who . . . Jackson was?" June 30). But Polaneczky claims she doesn't feel "a morsel" of sympathy for accused priests and refers to her frequent criticisms of the Philadelphia archdiocese in its handling of the priest abuse scandal. Polaneczky's reason for her sympathy for the late pop star is bunk and her duplicitous rationale smacks of anti-Catholic bias.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2003 | By Beth Gillin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The beliefs of conservative Catholic Mel Gibson, who likes his Mass in Latin and is no fan of Vatican II reforms, are laid bare in a freelance article by Malibu neighbor Christopher Noxon in tomorrow's New York Times Magazine. The story includes a less-than-flattering portrayal of the actor's father, Hutton Gibson, 85, a fierce critic of the Vatican and author of the polemical book Is the Pope Catholic? Noxon is said to quote the elder Gibson as calling Vatican II "a Masonic plot backed by the Jews.
NEWS
September 26, 2001
Merely killing the perpetrators, or even killing all of their brethren, will not suffice. They would be replaced by others who have no fear of death. However, the people and governments who harbor or otherwise support terrorists are not necessarily willing to sacrifice their lives and countries. Only the thorough destruction of those people and governments will deter them from supporting terrorism. We cannot defeat terrorism until terrorists have no refuge anywhere in the world, and only massive attacks against the countries that support them will achieve that end. Moreover, as long as terrorists walk this earth, we will live in a degree of fear, and can protect ourselves from them only through wide-ranging curtailments of our freedoms and civil liberties - which is exactly what they want.
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NEWS
May 30, 2015 | Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's Democratic ward leaders united Thursday behind former City Councilman James F. Kenney for mayor - with one noteworthy exception. State Sen. Anthony H. Williams did not attend a unity breakfast meeting organized by U.S. Rep. Robert Brady, the Democratic Party's city chairman. Williams, who finished a distant second to Kenney in last week's Democratic mayoral primary, leads the Third Ward in West Philadelphia. He was absent as other ward leaders ate scrambled eggs, bacon, and sausage while listening to short speeches in the Sheet Metal Workers union hall on Columbus Boulevard in South Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania is a forgiving place. Maybe too forgiving: I: Legend: For a while in the 1990s, TL Ventures looked like it would be Philadelphia's breakout venture-capital giant. Amid the dot.com boom, TL's first bets paid off, returning nearly 40 percent profits to early-bird clients like Pennsylvania's school pensions. That helped TL, run by former Fidelity Bank lender Robert Keith , raise more than $1 billion for more ambitious investments. The Pennsylvania State Employees' Retirement System (SERS)
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of two men charged in the July 25 carjacking and crash that killed a North Philadelphia mother and three of her children broke his silence in court Wednesday and pleaded for forgiveness. "I want to ask for forgiveness from the family," Jonathan Rosa blurted out at the end of his brief appearance before Philadelphia Municipal Court Judge Teresa Carr Deni. Rosa, 19, had just waived his right to a preliminary hearing and Deni then asked the routine, almost rhetorical question: "Is there anything else?"
NEWS
February 27, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
FOR MORE than a decade, Lamont Hatton watched his brother's killer, William Little - who spent 10 years in prison for the 1989 murder - walking around their South Philadelphia neighborhood, unarmed, unafraid and free. Hatton watched Little cut hair at the Jazz U Up barbershop at 16th and Tasker, and mentor young people there in the evenings, respected after his stint in prison for murder as a community hero for speaking out against guns and violence. And Hatton wondered: "Why is this man alive when my brother is dead?"
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
WHEN Hector Echevarria closes his eyes at night, all he sees is William Hopkins' face. After all, they were inseparable since childhood, playing pickup basketball and handball in the streets of Northeast Philadelphia. "Ever since then, he was by my side," said Echevarria, 18. "We were always together. " They stayed close throughout high school - Echevarria drove Hopkins to Northeast High every day. In return, Hopkins would cook for his buddy, whipping up plates of breaded chicken and Spanish rice in the Echevarria family kitchen on Mascher Street near Tabor Road in Olney.
NEWS
January 10, 2014
THERE'S A tax break for struggling homeowners that Congress shouldn't have let expire just before the new year. If not extended, some people selling their homes could get big tax bills. As the housing crisis in the middle of the last decade drove people into foreclosure, many borrowers were not aware that forgiven debt, including on mortgages, is considered income. In 2007, Congress passed the Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act to help people who were down on their luck financially because of the loss of their homes.
NEWS
December 5, 2013
"PLEASE forgive us thugs/cowards, because we're stupid. "We wake up in the worst situation you can imagine. There is no love or discipline where we come from. Our mommas are ignorant when it comes to education, love, respect or discipline. I'm in the streets from morning till night. "I'm angry . I'm ashamed to say that, but it's true. I live in a dirty neighborhood (of course, I contribute to the filth on the streets). I am not loved, don't know how to give love. I am hungry and scared.
NEWS
September 20, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
NEW YORK - Hanging out with author Terry McMillan is like chillin' with your worldly, slightly acerbic, super-chatty aunt. In the 1990s, she ushered in the era of black women's chick lit with her New York Times best-selling novel-turned-movie, Waiting to Exhale . The latest of the 61-year-old McMillan's eight tomes, Who Asked You? , was released Tuesday, launching her first book tour in three years. It will bring her Thursday night to the Free Library of Philadelphia, where she will join Jesmyn Ward, winner of the 2011 National Book Award for Salvage the Bones . "Now, she can write," McMillan says of Ward.
SPORTS
August 2, 2013 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
EAGLES LINEBACKER DeMeco Ryans said he woke up from a nap and saw several teammates gathered around a TV yesterday afternoon after practice. Ryans was curious. What was up? Eagles wideout Riley Cooper was up, on video. Wearing a plaid sleeveless shirt, a la "Larry the Cable guy," vowing to jump a fence and "fight every [N-word] here" at Lincoln Financial Field during a June 8 Kenny Chesney concert. Say what? "It was surprising to see exactly what the news was, when I was able to see it for myself," Ryans said.
SPORTS
August 2, 2013 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
CHIP KELLY understands that the expressions of forgiveness crafted for the cameras by Eagles players following Riley Cooper's apology weren't the final word. "This isn't a situation that you brush underneath the rug. It's going to take some time," the Eagles' coach said yesterday. "The guys that know Riley, and are a little bit closer to him, it may be a little bit easier for them, but there are also some guys who just met him and just got here, and they're still trying to wrap their arms around it. This isn't a situation that's going to go away tomorrow.
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