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Forgiveness

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NEWS
October 11, 2006 | By Elizabeth Eisenstadt-Evans
Students of Amish practice have said much recently about the stunning way in which the plain people incarnate the practice of forgiveness. As I watched that forgiveness in action, I wondered: Can a typcial Christian like me draw some meaning from this tragedy in ways that have everyday consequences? Can I learn from my brothers and sisters in Christ? If the Amish seem different, it is because in some ways, in their insularity and ascetic practice, they take the words of the New Testament more seriously than many of the vocal advocates for "family values" and cultural conservatism or liberal proponents of peace and social justice.
NEWS
October 2, 2011
L. Gregory Jones is professor of theology at Duke Divinity School, author of Embodying Forgiveness, and coauthor of Forgiving as We've Been Forgiven Five years ago, Charles Carl Roberts IV entered an Amish school in Nickel Mines, Pa., and shot 10 girls - mortally wounding five - before killing himself. This quiet, rural community in Lancaster County suddenly became a place of unprecedented contrasts - violence amid peaceful people, hordes of satellite trucks in a place that favors simplicity.
NEWS
February 3, 2002 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A crucified savior may have pleaded for it on behalf of his enemies, but not everybody has the power to overcome a grudge. Forgiveness is tough. "So many of the problems that people have when they come in for psychotherapy come out of real or imagined misdeeds that other people have committed against them," said Charles Zeiders, a psychologist and Christian counselor. On Saturday, Zeiders and colleagues Frances E. Schoeninger and Douglas Schoeninger will lead a daylong workshop designed to guide participants through the forgiveness process.
NEWS
April 19, 2005 | By Bill Tammeus
A few weeks ago, as the news pounded us with stories of vicious murders, I asked theologians, clergy, academics and others how our conscience gets formed. This was in the context of the killings of members of a judge's family in Chicago, a judge and others in an Atlanta courtroom, and 10 people, including the shooter, on the Red Lake Indian Reservation in Minnesota. This question seems to buzz around my head like a persistent horse fly: Is it possible to get beyond the reach of God's forgiveness?
NEWS
September 27, 1998 | By The Rev. R. Scott Rodin
Unique about the moral scandal in Washington is the confused, convoluted and often contradictory nature of the various religious voices we are hearing. Responses range from righteous indignation that seeks maximum retribution to an amnesia-laden support that can hardly imagine what all the fuss is about. The result is that the people in our pews are frustrated and perplexed. Our balanced Christian response must comprise three nonnegotiable points. The first is unreserved forgiveness.
LIVING
September 14, 1997 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Forgiveness does not come without accountability. " - The Rev. William Shaw, pastor of White Rock Baptist Church "We don't have a ministry of condemnation. " - The Rev. E.V. Hill, National Baptist ethics chairman He went to the annual meeting in Denver this month asking members of the nation's largest black church to forgive him for "errors," to pardon him for "mistakes. " The Rev. Henry Lyons, beleaguered president of the National Baptist Convention, U.S.A., admitted holding a female aide's money and church funds in the same account.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2008 | By Wendy Rosenfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Playwright Bryony Lavery's intention in Interact Theatre's current production, Frozen, was to show the healing nature of forgiveness; she was "horrified" to find, after watching a documentary about a series of British child murders, that the children's parents were "frozen" in their grief, unable to move on with their lives. And so she invented Catharine Slusar's Agnetha, a psychiatrist studying neurological similarities in serial killers, Jeb Kreager's pedophiliac murderer Ralph, and Mary Martello's Nancy, the mother of one of Ralph's young victims.
NEWS
July 6, 2009
IT'S disturbing that columnist Ronnie Polaneczky can feel inclined to forgive Michael Jackson of the credible allegations of child molestation simply because he was a "brilliant" entertainer ("Is it possible . . . to appreciate the totality of who . . . Jackson was?" June 30). But Polaneczky claims she doesn't feel "a morsel" of sympathy for accused priests and refers to her frequent criticisms of the Philadelphia archdiocese in its handling of the priest abuse scandal. Polaneczky's reason for her sympathy for the late pop star is bunk and her duplicitous rationale smacks of anti-Catholic bias.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2003 | By Beth Gillin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The beliefs of conservative Catholic Mel Gibson, who likes his Mass in Latin and is no fan of Vatican II reforms, are laid bare in a freelance article by Malibu neighbor Christopher Noxon in tomorrow's New York Times Magazine. The story includes a less-than-flattering portrayal of the actor's father, Hutton Gibson, 85, a fierce critic of the Vatican and author of the polemical book Is the Pope Catholic? Noxon is said to quote the elder Gibson as calling Vatican II "a Masonic plot backed by the Jews.
NEWS
September 26, 2001
Merely killing the perpetrators, or even killing all of their brethren, will not suffice. They would be replaced by others who have no fear of death. However, the people and governments who harbor or otherwise support terrorists are not necessarily willing to sacrifice their lives and countries. Only the thorough destruction of those people and governments will deter them from supporting terrorism. We cannot defeat terrorism until terrorists have no refuge anywhere in the world, and only massive attacks against the countries that support them will achieve that end. Moreover, as long as terrorists walk this earth, we will live in a degree of fear, and can protect ourselves from them only through wide-ranging curtailments of our freedoms and civil liberties - which is exactly what they want.
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NEWS
August 11, 2016
By Michael Gerson One of the most unintentionally revealing moments of Hillary Clinton's campaign so far came during last week's unconvincing explanation of the email affair: "I may have short-circuited it and for that I, ah, you know, will try to clarify. " Most of the resulting ridicule has focused on the "short-circuited" portion of the statement, which seems a particularly gentle euphemism for prevarication. But it is the latter portion of her quote - made in Washington at the combined meeting of the National Association of Black Journalists and National Association of Hispanic Journalists - that exposes a serious political disability: an ingrained, almost automatic recourse to guile.
NEWS
June 27, 2016
How did a veteran congressman come to think it was a good idea to appropriate half a million federal dollars to a fake charity devoted to cleaning up after water-skiers? Or take a down payment on a vacation home from a would-be ambassador whose bona fides he pitched to the president himself? Or repay an illegal loan to his campaign with laundered public money? The answer can be discerned in the collective shrug of Chaka Fattah's fellow Philadelphia Democrats last week when a jury found him to be the taxpayer-employed capo of a criminal organization.
SPORTS
May 13, 2016 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
SAM BRADFORD'S two weeks of temporary insanity ended Monday. He returned to the team and retracted his demand to be traded after signing, just weeks before, a two-year, $35 million contract. When he resumed voluntary workouts, he was by all accounts welcomed back by teammates without animosity. His quiet return in advance of this weekend's rookie minicamp nonetheless prompted a storm of speculation and recrimination: Sam's teammates resent his absence. Sam needs to apologize to his teammates.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion.   Question: What if the person you need to forgive is yourself? I bullied my younger sister as a kid/teen, and as a grown thirty-something, I feel incredible shame and guilt. I have apologized to her as an adult, which she seemed to have accepted, and I know much of it stemmed from being bullied and abused throughout those years myself. However, I can't seem to get past how I contributed to a lousy childhood for my sister - someone for whom I would now do anything and who will barely speak to me and the rest of our family.
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Ronnie Polaneczky
THERE THEY were on Tuesday morning, at opposite sides of Courtroom 1105 in the Criminal Justice Center: Two young women, each a mom to three children, face to face on the eve of the first anniversary of the worst year of their lives. Dominique Lockwood, 30, shook as she read a victim-impact statement describing how her life has changed since her angel-faced 4-year-old, Abdul Latif Wilson (his family calls him Latif), was killed by a hit-and-run driver on April 13, 2015, in Southwest Philly.
NEWS
March 12, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
Kyle Crosby said he never planned to kill his wife, Erica Crippen, on New Year's Eve in 2014, and acted out of fear afterward. "I was scared," said Crosby, who disposed of Crippen's body in Maryland farmland in the weeks after choking her in their Mount Laurel home. Crosby was sentenced to 31 years in prison for the crime Thursday in Superior Court in Burlington County, where he apologized to Crippen's family. "I miss Erica, my wife, terribly," Crosby said, adding to her family, "Hopefully one day you will find it in your hearts to forgive me. " Crosby pleaded guilty in December to aggravated manslaughter and hindering apprehension.
NEWS
September 25, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
As Pope Francis addresses political leaders Thursday at the Capitol before making his way to Philadelphia, another event is playing out that for decades has prompted a public examination of faith in America: the Republican presidential campaign. During the 2012 campaign, GOP nominee Mitt Romney's Mormon faith drew attention, while runner-up Rick Santorum, a Catholic, surged as a social-issues crusader. In 2008, Mike Huckabee, a former Southern Baptist pastor, carried the Iowa caucuses after stirring fervor with evangelical Christians.
NEWS
September 9, 2015
FOR THE rest of America, this has been the Summer of Donald Trump. For Greater Philadelphia, it has been the Summer of Pope Francis, transformed from global religious leader to ringmaster of a festival. We have witnessed the expanding semifiasco of Philadelphia laying out, pulling back and then re-folding the welcome mat. Hotel rooms that were said to be as scarce as water holes in the Sahara are now available. That seemed impossible just a few weeks ago. It also seemed impossible selfie sticks would be banned.
NEWS
September 4, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Justine McDaniel, and Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writers
In expanding the Catholic clergy's ability to forgive women who have had an abortion, Pope Francis this week earned praise from both sides of one of the United States' most polarizing social issues. In a letter Tuesday, the pope said rank-and-file clergy can grant absolution to those who repent with "contrite" hearts during the Holy Year of Mercy, also known as a Jubilee year. Previously, such forgiveness required the approval of a diocese. Bishops in Philadelphia, Camden, New York, and elsewhere have long allowed their priests to grant absolution for abortions, but many other dioceses did not. Pro-choice and antiabortion leaders from across the Philadelphia area praised the pope's stance as opening up a more understanding dialogue.
NEWS
September 4, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
IN HIS LETTER Tuesday about the upcoming Holy Year that starts in December, Pope Francis expanded on the general idea that all people who seek forgiveness will be forgiven as an experience of God's mercy. He added that during this special year, also known as a Holy Year of Mercy, all priests will have authority to forgive women who have had abortions. In many parts of the world, only bishops have had the authority to forgive abortion. Francis' letter doesn't represent a change in the church's doctrines.
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