FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 18, 2006
SINCE the guns are committing all the murders and robberies in Philadelphia, why don't we throw all the guns in prison - that'll eliminate the overcrowding, too. And why don't we take all the forks and spoons from people to take care of the obesity problem? It's the thug pulling the trigger that's the problem, and until that reality is realized, the death toll will continue to rise. John DiLorenzo, Philadelphia
NEWS
April 11, 1991 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Attempted murder charges were dropped Monday against James M. Vinson 2d after he pleaded guilty to stabbing at his King of Prussia home a Philadelphia man who had been dating Vinson's live-in girlfriend. Vinson, 27, who now lives on High Street in Norristown, pleaded guilty to aggravated assault for the Sept. 10, 1989, incident in which he attacked Erek Cunningham with a two-pronged barbecue fork. As part of a plea agreement with the Montgomery County District Attorney's Office, Vinson was sentenced to 11 1/2 to 23 months in the county jail.
NEWS
September 10, 2009
Ellen Yin grew up in the comfortable New York bedroom community of Rumson, N.J. Except that while other kids were having meat loaf and pasta for dinner, her mother, Ching Yun Yin, a Shanghai native, was putting out spreads of traditional Chinese dishes - jellyfish, braised oxtails, chicken feet, and soy-roasted duck. Now 44, Yin writes about those early days as a not-quite-classic "Chinese Jersey girl" in Forklore , her memoir of the first decade of Fork, her decidedly New American bistro in Old City.
FOOD
September 6, 2007 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's 5:10 p.m. whenFork restaurateur Ellen Yin learns the kitchen is low on zucchini blossoms and black rice. There's a long list of reservations for the main dining room of the Old City restaurant and private parties are scheduled in both back rooms; still, the menu can't be printed until Yin decides what to call the sauce that chef Thien Ngo created on a whim this afternoon. The sauce doesn't need a catchy name, just a straightforward description. Because, like Yin herself, Fork's lunch and dinner menus need no adulteration.
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | By Joshua Klein, Special to The Inquirer
An attempted murder charge has been filed against a King of Prussia man in the stabbing of a man with a barbecue fork on Saturday. According to police, James M. Vinson, 25, of the 600 block of American Avenue in King of Prussia, insisted that his live-in girlfriend Patricia O'Conner invite the victim, Eric Cunningham, 24, of the 400 block of Mount Pleasant Street in Philadelphia, to their home for the barbecue. Police said that O'Conner had been dating Cunningham for three weeks and that between Thursday and Saturday, Vinson had beaten O'Conner for having a relationship with Cunningham.
FOOD
November 16, 1997 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
The name is Fork. That's right. As in knife and. . . . And though the name doesn't provide much of a clue, Fork's point is freshness. We're told that macrobiotic food was what the owners of Old City's newest bistro originally planned to offer, but when it dawned that austere food is rarely fun, the concept was modified, and Fork now offers good-for-you American fare that changes with the seasons. On the day of a review dinner, for example, Fork's appetizers included bruschetta with zesty, just-right-for-fall toppings of warm beets, leeks and Gorgonzola replacing traditional - and summery - tomato mixtures.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2010 | By LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
As the song goes, "In heaven there is no beer," but East Falls has plenty at Fork and Barrel, the 6-week-old European beer haven. Fork and Barrel is the latest creation of Matt Scheller and Matt and Colleen Swartz, the Lehigh Valley trio who own and operate the Tap and Table and the Bookstore Speakeasy. They've ventured into Philadelphia with the concept of pairing a wide array of lesser-known European beers with dishes that are classically inspired farmhouse fare. Scheller heads up the beverage program that is so beer-centric, there's no wine or spirits.
NEWS
January 28, 2000 | by Beth D'Addono, For the Daily News
Where do food pros dine when they're not working in their own kitchens? In our new bi-weekly dining feature (running every other Friday), Big Fat Friday dines out with some of the area's finest restaurateurs, chefs, waiters and other food experts. Get to know them, and their favorite restaurants better. Anne-Marie Lasher doesn't eat out much. She's usually in the kitchen at Fork, the hip Old City American bistro she owns with partners Ellen Yin and Roberto Sella. But when she does go out, it tends to be in her Fairmount neighborhood.
NEWS
August 22, 2008 | Daily News reporters Catherine Lucey, Chris Brennan, John Baer, Michael Hinkelman and Bob Warner contributed to this report
THE CORPORATIONS that used to finance nonstop partying at the national political conventions face a new hurdle this time around. A new law prohibits lobbyists from buying meals for members of Congress - leading to some odd party-planning. One tactic - don't provide chairs. People don't eat "meals" standing up. Another tactic - no forks, just finger food. Gov. Rendell told reporters yesterday that he can live with the restrictions. "We never had forks at the convention," he said.
FOOD
November 22, 2013 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
'The Kulps kept Thanksgiving simple," says Eli Kulp. It's a hard thing to imagine, little Eli eagerly anticipating his childhood holiday table laden with boxed stuffing, green bean casserole topped with crunchy canned onions, and jellied cranberries jiggled out of a can. Even the sweet potatoes were canned. After all, Kulp has grown up to become one of Philadelphia's most inventive chefs at Fork, where the menu is hand-crafted from the finest local ingredients and whole ducks get turned into a labor-intensive, four-part masterpiece.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
June 20, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Trained as an electrical engineer, Mark Fischer spent most of his career focused on 21st-century technology. Then, three years ago, he reversed course - and went back to the 1800s. Fischer and his wife, Fran, had lived for years in what had been his grandparents' home, a picturesque but dilapidated 1730 gristmill complex on the Neshaminy Creek in Doylestown. After he left his job, he realized his greatest engineering challenge was right in his backyard: coaxing the mill back to life.
FOOD
June 20, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Long a forgettable freebie to take the edge off before the real food arrived, bread is getting fresh-baked respect on local tables. At fine-dining restaurants such as Fork and Avance, bread has been elevated to a "course" - complete with tasting notes - within elaborate prix fixe menus. And more restaurants are recognizing bread's value and charging for it: Petruce et al. puts a price on its hearth-baked sourdough, as does Pub and Kitchen for its whiskey-sage bread with ramp butter.
NEWS
June 8, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
SOMERS POINT, N.J. - When last we checked in with Andrew Latz, he was at war with his cantankerous father, Mack Latz, over the future of their family heirloom, the venerable Knife & Fork Inn in Atlantic City. Mack Latz was a formidable foe: "Nothing's enough for me. I gotta live. I'm a big liver," he said at age 86. Needless to say, Andrew Latz lost the war, despite an attack offense in which he sent out a news release detailing the "treachery, duplicity, and betrayal" allegedly carried out by Mack.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2014 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Dinner at the Rosen Schwartz household is no rushed, throw-a-slice-of-a-pizza-on-a-paper-plate affair. OK, it is on occasion - the hazard of 21st-century married-with-kids life. But often enough, and certainly on this school night, the family of four sit down to a properly set table for dinner - emphasis on properly set. "On a regular basis, I insist on this scaled-down formality, that there are essential items that belong in a table setting that go on our table," Lynn Rosen, 52, says from her Elkins Park house.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
POLICE WHO responded to a domestic dispute in Upper Darby on Tuesday were shocked to discover a 3-year-old autistic boy in the house with the burn print of a fork on his face. The child's father, Miguel Sanchez, 48, was arrested in connection with the brutal act, and the child's mother is now under investigation for cigarette burns discovered on the chest of another of the couple's four children, said Upper Darby Police Superintendent Michael Chitwood. "These poor kids were treated like they were animals," Chitwood said.
FOOD
November 22, 2013 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
'The Kulps kept Thanksgiving simple," says Eli Kulp. It's a hard thing to imagine, little Eli eagerly anticipating his childhood holiday table laden with boxed stuffing, green bean casserole topped with crunchy canned onions, and jellied cranberries jiggled out of a can. Even the sweet potatoes were canned. After all, Kulp has grown up to become one of Philadelphia's most inventive chefs at Fork, where the menu is hand-crafted from the finest local ingredients and whole ducks get turned into a labor-intensive, four-part masterpiece.
FOOD
July 12, 2013 | By Michelle Dembo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Red, green, or purple. Curly, smooth, dinosaur, or lacinato. Siberian, baby, whatever - it's all kale, and it's clearly all the rage. It's on practically every menu, at both fine-dining establishments like Fork, where Eli Kulp includes kale "crisps" in a green salad, and at Morgan's Pier, one of the hippest menus of the moment, where George Sabatino offers kale croquettes. The Cedar Point Bar & Kitchen in Fishtown is shaking up kale martinis. All this from the green mostly seen as a sturdy salad-bar liner just a few years ago. Tom Culton, an organic farmer from Lancaster County popular with local chefs, grew dinosaur kale for two years before he sold it to anyone.
FOOD
January 25, 2013 | By Joyce Gemperlein, For The Inquirer
It didn't take long for chicken nuggets, the go-to protein for many American children, to come up in conversation when Eli Kulp and the staff of Fork were brainstorming snack ideas for the bar menu at the Market Street restaurant. "Chicken nuggets have all-American roots," says Kulp, the executive chef of the Old City restaurant. That means they're appropriate fodder for Fork, where the challenge is "taking familiar food and presenting it in new ways or shedding new light on it," Kulp says.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2013
In a BYO-centric city, it's reassuring to know some restaurant lists can still lead to previously unknown treasures. Fork is a prime example, in part because of the relationships it cultivates with vintners. This fantastic Sicilian white, Leone, for example, is from Tasca d'Almerita, the family estate of the late cookbook author Anna Tasca Lanza, whose author-daughter, Fabrizia, recently collaborated with Fork on a meal. With its especially juicy blend of lemony native catarratto, pinot blanc, sauvignon and exotic gew├╝rztraminer, it's perfectly balanced for the menu's pastas, cooked seafood, and crudo.
SPORTS
December 23, 2012
Q. I have a 14-year-old son who is looking to lift weights in addition to basketball practice. When is a good age to start? - Plymouth Dad A: Now would be a good time, dad, but he needs to start with the proper supervision of a good weight trainer. At his age he doesn't need to bulk up, just have him work on technique and getting familiar with all the equipment and what is best for each muscle group. You want to see him get toned and develop reasonable muscle mass for his age. Your son also needs to do more in a gym than just pump iron.
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