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Fort Dix

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NEWS
August 1, 1990 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
Despite the prospect of a dwindling workforce at Fort Dix, the military base's new chief of staff is looking forward to "the challenge of the changes" that will take place there in the next three years. Col. Michael L. Warner, who began his new duties in June, said he thought that although its basic-training operations were being scaled down, Fort Dix remained a "great place to be. " Two years ago, the Army announced that Dix's basic-training mission would be phased out by 1993.
NEWS
November 25, 2002 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Many are 18 years old and heading overseas for the first time. Some are mothers in their 40s with 18-year-old sons and daughters. They arrive at Fort Dix from all over the country, with different accents, backgrounds and family issues - about 14,000 troops since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. But before they go - possibly to war with Iraq - each is prepared by a group of military and civilian professionals who sweat every detail, no matter how small. The group's mission, as the American military machine shifts into high gear, is to make sure Army reservists and National Guard troops have the knowledge and tools to survive.
NEWS
December 24, 1989 | By Charlie Frush, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deborah A. Davis, a lifetime Springfield resident and chief of the petroleum, oil and lubricants branch's supply division at Fort Dix, has been honored as top civilian employee for the most recent quarter at Fort Dix. "I love working outside," said Davis, 32. "I'd rather be outside than pushing papers. " But she has to do a lot of that, too, because in her 5 1/2 years on this job, she's been in charge of all the fuel oil arriving at Fort Dix, the New Jersey Army Reserve centers and the New York Area Army Command - 69 delivery locations in all. Normally, she handles this by phone, but she has a different goal in mind down the road.
NEWS
August 1, 1989 | By Matthew Purdy, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Fort Dix inched closer to the end of its career as a training base yesterday as the House rejected an attempt to stop the Pentagon's plans to close or scale back operations at 14 military bases, including the Burlington County installation. Before approving an $8.7 billion military construction appropriations bill for 1990, the House removed from the bill an amendment that would have forbidden the Pentagon to use money to close or reduce operations at bases where timely cost savings could not be demonstrated.
NEWS
October 13, 1991 | By Frank Brown, Special to The Inquirer
Within the next month, nearly half of the civilian employees at Fort Dix will get a letter in the mail telling them that they might be transferred or terminated or fired by next fall. The Army calls it a mock reduction in force - an effort to give civilian employees ample warning of how they may be affected by cuts mandated in late 1988. The decision to take away Fort Dix's basic training mission was made almost three years ago, but Oct. 4 was the first announcement by the Army of the exact number of civilian employees who will be affected by the realignment.
NEWS
April 25, 1991 | By Frank Brown, Special to The Inquirer
In the weeks after the Department of Defense recommended the virtual closing of Fort Dix, Pemberton Township Mayor Thalia C. Kay has emerged as a leader in the effort to cushion the potentially disastrous effects of a closing. Kay returned on Sunday to Pemberton Township from a five-day trip to Washington, D.C., where she met with Rep. Jim Saxton (R., N.J.) and Don Hester, an aide to Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D., N.J.), to discuss strategies for dealing with the Pentagon's recommendation.
NEWS
November 22, 1989 | By Douglas A. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Military housing at Fort Dix will be occupied even after the base loses its major role as a basic training facility, an Army spokesman said yesterday. The 2,106 units have been offered to the Air Force, Navy and Coast Guard, which have all shown interest in them, according to Maj. Joe Padilla, an Army spokesman in Washington. Whether the housing units are occupied is crucial to Pemberton Township, where about 1,800 of that municipality's 7,700 school students are children who live at Fort Dix. Children with military parents account for 3,120 of Pemberton's school enrollment.
NEWS
March 23, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
Giuseppe "Joe" Giudice, a Real Housewives of New Jersey star, is expected to begin a 41-month prison sentence Wednesday at the Federal Correctional Institution at Fort Dix on bankruptcy fraud and conspiracy charges. His wife, Teresa, who also pleaded guilty to fraud charges, was released in December from the Federal Correctional Institution in Danbury, Conn., after serving nearly a year there. The couple are featured in the Bravo reality show, first telecast in 2009. They have four daughters.
NEWS
February 23, 1989 | By Matthew Purdy, Inquirer Washington Bureau
With the future of Fort Dix slipping through their fingers, eight members of the New Jersey delegation ranted, raved and reasoned at a congressional hearing yesterday in an attempt to derail the Pentagon's plan to drastically reduce operations at the Burlington County Army base. The congressmen and senators contended that the decision to "mothball" Fort Dix ignored the fact that nearly $200 million has been invested at the base since 1980, and overstated the projected savings of transferring the base's training operations to three Southern bases.
NEWS
May 4, 1999 | By Leonard N. Fleming, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Military officials at Fort Dix spent yesterday getting ready for the first Kosovo refugees, making final food preparations, working through detailed rehearsals, and collecting a stash of toys for the homeless children. "We're told to expect those most at risk," said Carolee J. Nisbet, a spokeswoman for Fort Dix. "We still expect them to move on from this site and get with their sponsors. " The first contingent, which will arrive tomorrow, will receive medical exams at the fort, and then the process of linking the refugees with families will begin in earnest.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 5, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Emalene Mason Price, 93, an elementary schoolteacher at the former Fort Dix and in Mount Holly, died of congestive heart failure Sunday, June 26, at her home in the senior retirement community of Granville Place in Burlington City. Born on a farm near Blissfield, Mich., Mrs. Price graduated from Blissfield High School and then earned a bachelor's at the University of Michigan in 1945. She moved to Washington to become a government employee, transferred to Hawaii, and met and married William D. Price, an Air Force pilot stationed at the former Hickam Air Force Base there, son James C. said.
NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By Barbara Boyer, Staff Writer
The family of three Cherry Hill brothers protested Wednesday outside the federal courthouse in Camden after the men lost another attempt to overturn their convictions for participating in a plan to kill soldiers at Fort Dix. The protest came a day after the family learned that U.S. District Judge Robert Kugler denied the brothers' application for post-conviction relief. The Dukas wanted their convictions overturned, alleging their attorneys improperly prevented them from testifying during their 2008 trial.
NEWS
June 1, 2016 | By Stephanie Farr, Staff Writer
Richard Creamer says he was living high, a real estate and entertainment lawyer with "six or seven" houses and a few nice cars, when he began a high-grade cannabis-growing operation at a North Philadelphia warehouse in 2009. "It came across my plate in a way that was like, 'This makes really, really crazy economic sense to me at this moment in my life,' and I didn't hold it to a great deal more scrutiny," said Creamer, 44. "It didn't take me very long to wish that I had. " In July 2009, federal authorities raided Creamer's operation, which produced about 20 pounds of marijuana a month, and busted Creamer and his pot-growing partner.
NEWS
May 16, 2016
IF YOU'RE ever in the state House chamber or watch proceedings on PCN, you may notice a guy always standing on the dais beside the speaker. That guy's Clancy Myer. He's House parliamentarian, for like 30 years, basically the referee for fights over rules and procedure in the oft-contentious and partisan 203-member legislative body. Myer's rulings can determine what becomes Pennsylvania law and what doesn't. And he's about to start working at high-alert status as lawmakers rush to meet yet another June 30 state budget deadline.
NEWS
May 2, 2016
Hello there After spending the morning reading and relaxing at the Hamilton Square Barnes & Noble, Talisha thought she'd treat herself to lunch at the nearby Chili's. "I was just about to read a magazine when he passed by. " He was Tim. "She was beautiful," he said. "Her face drew me to her. And there was just something about her. " Tim changed course for Talisha's table. "He was trying to flirt, and then we started talking. " They had just 30 minutes to chat that day in early June 2015 - long enough to discover they were both single, both funny, and both military.
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
No fairy tale for Bridget The 2002 romcom hit Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason seemed to end on a happy note: Mark Darcy ( Colin Firth ) proposed to Bridget. But things quickly go south, says Renée Zellweger , who returns as the beloved heroine in a new sequel, Bridget Jones' Baby , due Sept. 16. It finds Bridget single, alone - and pregnant. "She's a bit more mature," Zellweger tells Entertainment Weekly. Mature? Really? Bridget's baby wasn't exactly planned.
NEWS
March 24, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
Giuseppe "Joe" Giudice, a Real Housewives of New Jersey star, is expected to begin a 41-month prison sentence Wednesday at the Federal Correctional Institution at Fort Dix on bankruptcy fraud and conspiracy charges. His wife, Teresa, who also pleaded guilty to fraud charges, was released in December from the Federal Correctional Institution in Danbury, Conn., after serving nearly a year there. The couple are featured in the Bravo reality show, first telecast in 2009. They have four daughters.
NEWS
January 8, 2016 | By Barbara Boyer, Staff Writer
Three brothers from Cherry Hill, seeking to overturn their convictions for participating in a plan to kill soldiers at Fort Dix, told a federal judge Wednesday that their attorneys had improperly prevented them from testifying during their 2008 trial. The men, all serving life terms, returned for a hearing in Camden before U.S. District Judge Robert Kugler, who was the trial judge. Each separately testified that although he had a good relationship with his defense attorney, he was not advised properly of his right to testify, and requests to do so were ignored.
NEWS
November 15, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a court hearing looming, supporters of three brothers convicted in 2008 of conspiring to kill U.S. soldiers took part Friday in the first of several planned weekly demonstrations outside the federal courthouse in downtown Camden. The parents of Dritan, Shain, and Eljvir Duka - three of five men who became known as the Fort Dix Five - and a handful of supporters said the vigils are intended to heighten awareness about the case as the brothers prepare to argue in court that they were improperly compelled by defense attorneys to not testify during their initial trial seven years ago. U.S. District Judge Robert B. Kugler in late September granted the brothers a hearing, set for January, that will allow them to present evidence regarding their claim that they were denied the right to testify.
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