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NEWS
November 18, 2009 | By JOHN GRANT
REFERRING to post-9/11 anti-Muslim reaction and the Bush administration's rush to war, Susan Sontag said: "By all means, let's mourn together. But let's not be stupid together. " The 13 murders by Major Nidal Malik Hasan at Fort Hood, Texas, seem to be provoking a similar strain of stupidity in American politics. Once the shooting occurred, theories began whipping around like confetti in the wind. At this point, only Hasan really knows why he went postal. But some incendiary clues are flying around in this storm.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | By Angela K. Brown, Associated Press
FORT HOOD, Texas - The Army psychiatrist charged in the Fort Hood shooting rampage still faces the death penalty if convicted in the worst mass shooting on a U.S. military installation, a judge ruled Wednesday. The judge, Col. Tara Osborn, was expected to rule later on Maj. Nidal Hasan's request to plead guilty to 13 counts of premeditated murder in the 2009 attack on the Texas Army post. However, Army rules prohibit a judge from accepting a guilty plea in a death-penalty case, so her earlier ruling Wednesday indicates he would not be allowed to plead guilty as long as that punishment option remains on the table.
NEWS
July 26, 2012 | Associated Press
FORT HOOD, Texas - An Army psychiatrist charged with killing 13 people in a shooting rampage at Fort Hood will be forcibly shaved if he doesn't remove his beard himself, a judge said Wednesday. Maj. Nidal Hasan appeared in court Wednesday sporting a beard as he did during a court appearance last month. The beard violates Army regulations, but Hasan said it is an expression of his Muslim faith. The judge, Col. Gregory Gross, held Hasan in contempt of court for keeping the beard and fined him $1,000.
NEWS
November 19, 2009
LET'S GET something straight. Op-ed writer John Grant (Nov. 18) isn't interested in "getting the Fort Hood murders right. " This is about?his favorite pastime, trashing America. He gets to do this because he is a Vietnam vet and the far-left Daily News editorial board likes nothing better then disgruntled veterans. I'm also a Vietnam vet, and Grant makes me sick to my stomach. He quotes Susan Sontag, who also blamed America for everything wrong in the world. In 1968, Sontag visited her friends in Hanoi while 16,000 U.S. soldiers were being killed by them that year.
NEWS
November 11, 2009
THE EMERGING stories about the background of Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, acused of killing 13 military personnel at Fort Hood last week, should not obscure the importance of the story he shares with too many others: the extraordinary demands on mind, body and spirit that we impose on our military men and women, and the often deadly ways that our soldiers cope with those demands. In Hasan's case, the pressure of being deployed to Afghanistan is one of the factors cited in his deterioration, although the picture is getting muddier as news of his communication with a militant imam emerges.
NEWS
November 11, 2009
Seven years after the end of World War I, Congress urged the recognition of Nov. 11 - then Armistice Day - with these words: "It is fitting that the recurring anniversary of this date should be commemorated with thanksgiving and prayer and exercises designed to perpetuate peace... " Yesterday, appropriately, the prayers, led by the commander in chief, were directed at Fort Hood, Texas, where 13 people were killed and 29 others wounded last week in a shooting rampage. The nation's thoughts and good wishes will remain with the Fort Hood community for some time, added to the daily prayers to keep safe all those who serve in harm's way. But also, on this Veterans Day, the nation takes up its solemn responsibility to say thanks and try to bring some peace.
NEWS
February 24, 2012
A Philadelphia soldier assigned to Fort Hood in Texas died this week of injuries suffered in a motorcycle accident, military officials said Thursday. Spc. Sharod Ahkeim Carroll, 31, died Tuesday in Killeen, Texas. He was assigned to the Fourth Infantry Division and had been with the 62d Expeditionary Support Battalion, 11th Signal Brigade, at Fort Hood since January. - Inquirer staff
NEWS
August 9, 2011
Fort Hood heroes losing their jobs FORT HOOD, Texas - The two Fort Hood police officers celebrated as heroes for responding first to the 2009 shooting massacre at this Army post were told recently they would lose their jobs as part of broader military budget cuts. Kimberly Munley and Mark Todd, who is credited with taking down suspected shooter Maj. Nidal Hasan, have both left Fort Hood ahead of their job terminations. Fort Hood officials said other civilian police on the post who were hired on a year-to-year basis would likewise not see their employment renewed.
NEWS
April 13, 2005 | By William Douglas INQUIRER NATIONAL STAFF
President Bush yesterday marked the second anniversary of Baghdad's fall by thanking soldiers who played a major role in toppling Iraqi President Saddam Hussein and telling them their work in Iraq was far from over. Bush delivered a pep talk in which he effusively thanked soldiers at Fort Hood, the Army's largest active-duty armored post, for helping coalition forces race across more than 350 miles of Iraqi desert to seize Baghdad on April 9, 2003, less than three weeks after the war began.
NEWS
February 28, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A Pennsylvania man and a North Jersey man were among 10 soldiers killed in Thursday's crash of a twin-rotor Army helicopter near Chico, Texas, Army officials said Friday. A Camden County man was injured. Capt. Michael J. Monahan, 35, of Kingston in Luzerne County, Pa., was one of the dead identified by authorities. He was attached to the 21st Field Artillery, First Cavalry Division, at Fort Hood in central Texas. Also killed was First Lt. Wayne M. Locklin, 23, of Sayreville in Middlesex County, N.J. Locklin was a 1986 graduate of West Point who was attached to the 92d Field Artillery, Second Armored Division, according to his mother.
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NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
JOINT BASE - First came the distant whining of jet engines, then shrieking attack dives and the whirring growl of 30mm rotary cannons. Two A-10 Thunderbolts, known affectionately as "Warthogs" or "Hogs," made their runs Wednesday at a sprawling, isolated gunnery range at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in Burlington County. The two armored personnel carriers on the ground never had a chance. They were obliterated. The planes banked, circled, and dropped 25-pound practice bombs on nearby tanks before again firing a burst from their nose cannons into the armored personnel carriers.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
YOU COULDN'T mistake that Texas drawl. Even though it faded a bit after many years in the Philadelphia area, which has its own distinctive accents, those smooth Texas tones were unmistakably Tom Schmidt's. Tom was a newspaperman of the old school - tough, creative, dedicated, the kind of reporter who didn't let much get in his way when he was chasing a story. He was also an editor who specialized in guiding young reporters along the right way to pursue a story, then correcting and polishing their prose after they turned it in. When he came to the Philadelphia area in the 1960s, Tom brought with him not only the accents but also the sensibilities of his native Texas Hill Country, both of which remained among his defining characteristics.
NEWS
October 7, 2014 | BY JAMES JAY CARAFANO
  IT'S ONLY natural, with reports of terrorist groups such as the Islamic State filling the news, for Americans to question just how safe they are - and if the threat is greater now than it used to be. We've never really been safe. At least that's what a database maintained by The Heritage Foundation finds. It tracks Islamist-related terrorist plots since 9/11 aimed at attacking the U.S. homeland. The number of documented times that terrorists have tried to sow murder and mayhem on American soil adds up to more than 60. In private, U.S. counterterrorism officials suggest that the number of thwarted plots, including some that may have been short-circuited in the "aspirational" stage, is higher.
NEWS
April 8, 2014
THERE was an eerie familiarity to the headlines when a soldier on Fort Hood Army base reportedly went on a rampage last week, killing or wounding 19 people before turning the gun on himself. In the immediate aftermath of such tragedies, we often find ourselves with more questions than answers. But with the facts now available, a narrative all too common among our nation's servicemen and women is quickly beginning to take shape. During a news conference after the shooting, Lt. Gen. Mark Milley, the commanding officer at the military installation, told reporters that the alleged gunman, identified as Spec.
NEWS
September 19, 2013
Mass shootings in America occur so frequently - nearly 30 in the 14 years since the 13 Columbine High School murders - it's a wonder that they garner as much attention as they do. The frequency may help to explain why a push for gun control after 20 schoolchildren and six adults were killed in the Newtown, Conn., massacre fizzled. Nine months later, the country is again wringing its hands after a lone gunman killed 12 people Tuesday at the Washington Navy Yard before being fatally shot by police.
NEWS
August 14, 2013
RONNIE POLANECZKY is 100 percent right when she opines that Philadelphia's future hangs on the viability of its educational system ("If schools fail, so will Philly," Sunday). We are indeed an interdependent community, and what affects some affects all. In 2001, the nearly 200-year-old School District of Philadelphia was taken over by the state, supposedly to correct inequities caused by a funding formula that had dropped statewide from 55 percent in 1975 to less than 36 percent in 2001, while depending more and more on local property taxes.
NEWS
July 17, 2013 | By Angela K. Brown, Associated Press
FORT HOOD, Texas - Prosecutors asked Monday that three Army officers be dismissed as potential jurors in the murder trial of the Fort Hood shooting suspect because of their views on the death penalty. Six potential jurors - four colonels and two lieutenant colonels - were brought in from Army posts nationwide and overseas as questioning continued in the court-martial of Maj. Nidal Hasan. The Army psychiatrist faces execution or life in prison without parole if convicted in the 2009 rampage that left 13 dead and nearly three dozen wounded on the Texas Army post.
NEWS
July 4, 2013 | By Angela K. Brown, Associated Press
FORT HOOD, Texas - The Army psychiatrist charged in the deadly 2009 Fort Hood shootings can ask potential jurors if they would consider punishment other than execution for someone who killed for religious reasons, a judge said Wednesday. Maj. Nidal Hasan, who is serving as his own attorney, also can ask potential jurors if they would consider remorse - or a lack thereof - in determining a convicted murderer's punishment, the judge ruled. Jury selection in his court-martial is to begin next Tuesday and last at least four weeks.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Angela K. Brown, Associated Press
FORT HOOD, Texas - A uniformed Army psychiatrist had no justification for gunning down U.S. troops and won't be allowed to tell jurors that he was protecting Taliban leaders in Afghanistan, a military judge ruled Friday, appearing to clear the way for the Fort Hood murder trial to begin. Maj. Nidal Hasan's "defense of others" strategy fails as a matter of law, Col. Tara Osborn said during a 45-minute hearing. That strategy must show that a killing was necessary to prevent the immediate harm or death of others.
NEWS
June 13, 2013 | By Angela K. Brown, Associated Press
FORT HOOD, Texas - Defense attorneys ordered to help the Army psychiatrist charged in the 2009 Fort Hood shooting rampage said Tuesday that it would be unethical to give him their legal advice and opinions while he's representing himself at his forthcoming murder trial. After allowing Maj. Nidal Hasan to serve as his own attorney, Col. Tara Osborn, an Army judge, last week said his former attorneys would stand by and help him if he requests it. On Tuesday, former lead defense attorney Lt. Col. Kris Poppe said that complying with the judge's order would be unethical because it seems to have no limits and requires the attorneys to give legal opinions in addition to doing research.
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