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Fort Mifflin

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2015 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
Avast, ye landlubbers! Keelhaul the mizzenmast, and take those scurvy doubloons and, uh, bury them someplace obscure, make a confusing map on crumbly paper, and then lose the map. Aaaaarrrrrr! We're just practicing our buccaneer-type lingo for Saturday's Pirate Day at Fort Mifflin , where a gang of freebooting corsairs will swoop in and battle with the fort's soldiers (11 a.m. and 3 p.m.), then pillage, loot, and - oh, wait, no. It says here they'll actually be helping visitors explore 18th-century history by, among other things, explaining the difference between a privateer and a pirate.
NEWS
June 29, 1998 | Inquirer photos by Michael Perez
Fort Mifflin yesterday relived the 1777 British barrage that left King George shaken up by how determined the Americans were to block supplies to redcoats in occupied Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 6, 1994 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
A fire destroyed an Army Corps of Engineers storage building at Hog Island and Fort Mifflin roads in Southwest Philadelphia yesterday. There were no injuries. During the fire, near historic Fort Mifflin, one of the building's walls collapsed. In photo above, firefighters help a colleague who fell or was knocked over, apparently when a hose under pressure was disconnected. An aerial ladder (right) and a marine unit in the Delaware River also battled the fire.
NEWS
November 11, 1996 | Inquirer photographs by Michael S. Wirtz
American soldiers lost the battle at Fort Mifflin 219 years ago, but they won valuable time for the colonists by delaying British supply ships. Yesterday - the anniversary of the day the battle began - about 50 re-enactors were at the rebuilt fort, on the Delaware River south of the Schuylkill, to re-create the defeat.
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The reenacting season opened with a literal cannon shot over the mud and snow at Fort Mifflin on Saturday afternoon. A diverse array of reenactors portraying German and Allied soldiers slogging through the bloody Battle of Verdun in 1916 looked on, and a group of 21st-century visitors watched in the bright sun, enticed by the fort's First World War reenactment and a break in the frigid weather. Despite the tangled, time-warpish nature of the gathering, it would seem a typical opening for Fort Mifflin, a local and National Historic Landmark by Philadelphia International Airport on the Delaware River.
NEWS
May 25, 1990 | BY RICHARD C. TORBERT
Fort Mifflin, which lies at the southern tip of the city where the Schuylkill River flows into the Delaware, is a Philadelphia treasure. Until recently, it was a hidden one. The fort, which played a vital role in the defense of the colonies during the second year of the Revolutionary War, has a long and honorable history. It was designed by John Montresor, a British army engineer and construction began on Mud Island in 1772. Rumblings of the coming rebellion, however, brought the work to a halt.
NEWS
December 9, 2013 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA When John Christinzio was a kid, he spent a month in school learning about World War II. Today, he said, it is just a "blip" on the school calendar, five days at most. That's one of the reasons the 52-year-old architect from South Philadelphia brought his fifth-grade son to Fort Mifflin on Saturday, the 72d anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The Fort Mifflin event not only marked this nation's entrance into the war, but it also hosted the reenactment of one of the more obscure battles of World War II, the Battle for Schmidt in Germany's Hurtgen Forest in November 1944.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2012 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
On Saturday and Sunday, enjoy a weekend of living history and experience the American Revolution as Fort Mifflin and the Olde Fort Mifflin Historical Society celebrate the 235th anniversary of the Siege and Bombardment. Guests can go on a kid-friendly scavenger hunt and speak to actors portraying soldiers to find items such as an argyle stocking, a slow match, cocoa nibs, and more. Learn about 18th-century weapons and how soldiers prepared meals in open-hearth demonstrations. Join the Continental Army, participate in a musket drill, then reenergize with a sample of American Heritage chocolate.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | By Edward Colimore,Inquirer Staff Writer
In the Delaware River lay the mighty British navy, its 10 warships bristling with cannons and ready for action. On nearby land, more big guns, all trained on the target: a small, star-shaped fort that withstood one pounding after another. For six weeks, the band of defiant Americans - most wounded or ill - held on, in the muddy rubble, against the world's pre-eminent power. Some of them actually collected spent British cannonballs and fired them back at their attackers. In the end, after the walls of their garrison were flattened by the greatest bombardment of the Revolutionary War, the Americans evacuated Fort Mifflin, leaving their flag flying over the burning ruins.
NEWS
November 30, 1987 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
At one point in the siege, American soldiers scurried about gathering spent enemy cannonballs to fire back at their attackers, and British marines were so close that they pitched grenades into the fort from a ship's crow's-nest. Down below, the British broadsides splintered timbers and gouged the earth as the Americans hugged the muddy rubble. In the end, the defenders stole across the Delaware at night, their flag still flying over the blazing wreck of the fort on Mud Island. "The behaviour of the (Americans)
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NEWS
August 20, 2016
Need something to do this weekend? Don't worry, we got you covered. BUMP, GRIND 9 p.m. Friday, World Cafe Live , 3025 Walnut St. $18. 215-222-1400. Approved by Game of Thrones scribe George R.R. Martin (but not necessarily part of the Westeros canon), this show features swords, skin, and steamy goings-on. If not for having a bit less gore - and a lot more pasties - it might qualify as an episode of G.R.R.M.'s and HBO's pastiche epic, albeit less grim and more fun. The cast, featuring the talents of Bella La Blanc and Cherie Sweetbottom, will be joined by guest Noelle Reigns from the far-flung region of New York - the fabled metropolis to the north said to exist past the wilds of New Jersey.  - Michael Harrington FILM Party at 6 p.m., movie at 7:30 p.m. Friday, William Way Community Center, 1315 Spruce St. $25. 215-587-9377.
NEWS
July 23, 2016
Need something to do this weekend? Don't worry, we've got you covered. KIDS 10:30 a.m. Friday and 11 a.m. Saturday, Gratz College Theater, 7605 Old York Rd., Melrose Park. $14; $12 ages 12 and under. 215-659-8550 . Abington's Storybook Musical Theatre presents Patricia Goldberg and Kevin Arruda's musical adaptation of the classic tale of a selfless young woman betrothed to an arrogant prince transformed into a hideous creature - and the true meaning of love.  - Michael Harrington 2 to 7 p.m. Saturday at Historic Fair Hill , 2901 Germantown Ave. Free.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2016
KIDS 10 a.m. Friday, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory , 100 Stellarator Rd., Princeton. Free. pppl.gov. Got a little Einstein? Of course you do. Give him or her a boost in science curiosity with a tour of the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory led by an engineer or physicist. Learn about fusion energy, and get a behind-the-scenes look at a place where scientists are creating "a star on Earth" as a future power source. (Yeah, we know - it's really cool.)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2015 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
Avast, ye landlubbers! Keelhaul the mizzenmast, and take those scurvy doubloons and, uh, bury them someplace obscure, make a confusing map on crumbly paper, and then lose the map. Aaaaarrrrrr! We're just practicing our buccaneer-type lingo for Saturday's Pirate Day at Fort Mifflin , where a gang of freebooting corsairs will swoop in and battle with the fort's soldiers (11 a.m. and 3 p.m.), then pillage, loot, and - oh, wait, no. It says here they'll actually be helping visitors explore 18th-century history by, among other things, explaining the difference between a privateer and a pirate.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2015 | BY DAN SPINELLI, For the Daily News
Over its nearly 240-year history, Fort Mifflin has survived a siege and a prison break across three major wars. But last Saturday, the brick-and-mortar fortress next to Philadelphia International Airport saw combat of a different sort. Grown men and women ran back and forth across the fort's parade ground with broomsticks between their legs. They were playing Quidditch - the magical sport from the Harry Potter wizard-fantasy series. With planes flying overhead to land at the airport, members of the South Jersey Hellhounds , an amateur Quidditch squad, chased after the elusive Golden Snitch - or in this "Muggle-re-enactment," a player in yellow gym shorts with a ball attached to the backside.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2015 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
What everybody remembers about Geppetto's famed puppet is that his nose grows when he's untruthful - his elongated proboscis has even become a symbol pasted on those who lie habitually, such as, say, politicians. It's kind of unfortunate, because what's really touching about the little wooden fellow's story is that he wants to be a real boy. The incident with his nose is just a step in the moral learning process leading to his goal, which means there's more to Pinocchio than meets the eye. The Storybook Musical Theatre's production of Carlo Collodi's tale of the mischievous marionette ends its run this weekend.
NEWS
March 31, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Hessians were out for blood that autumn day in 1777. They marched 10 miles from Haddonfield to Red Bank, hoping to surprise the American defenders of Fort Mercer on the Delaware River. Instead, they fell into a trap. Many of Britain's German allies passed over the abandoned earthen walls topped with pointed logs, and then cheered, thinking they'd breached the fort and were close to victory. On the other side, though, was another wall - and a deadly hail of artillery and musket fire that cut through their ranks like a scythe.
NEWS
March 9, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The reenacting season opened with a literal cannon shot over the mud and snow at Fort Mifflin on Saturday afternoon. A diverse array of reenactors portraying German and Allied soldiers slogging through the bloody Battle of Verdun in 1916 looked on, and a group of 21st-century visitors watched in the bright sun, enticed by the fort's First World War reenactment and a break in the frigid weather. Despite the tangled, time-warpish nature of the gathering, it would seem a typical opening for Fort Mifflin, a local and National Historic Landmark by Philadelphia International Airport on the Delaware River.
NEWS
July 30, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a breathless Jonas Cattell dashed into Fort Mercer that October day in 1777, the enemy wasn't far behind. Hours earlier, the 18-year-old had overheard talk of an attack on the American fort and ran the 10 miles from Haddonfield to Red Bank, Gloucester County, bypassing Hessian mercenaries along the way. His timely warning gave the American defenders time to reposition their artillery and set a trap that decimated the Hessians. About 400 of them - a third of the German force - were mowed down by cannon and musket fire, then buried in a mass grave at what is now Red Bank Battlefield Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2014 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Join the troops and celebrate the bicentennial of "The Star-Spangled Banner" on Saturday at Fort Mifflin's "The War of 1812: Celebrating Our National Anthem. " Guests will learn the history of the fort, including its preparedness to defend Philadelphia. Guided tours and living history activities will be featured, and you can sign up to join the Fort Mifflin Rifle Regiment to learn drills and colonial military activities. In honor of the bicentennial, guests will learn the little-known connection between Fort Mifflin and Fort McHenry.
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