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Founding Fathers

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NEWS
June 3, 2001
On the Sunday before July Fourth, we'll run reader responses to the following: If you could sit down with one of the Founding Fathers from that summer in 1776, who would it be and what would you ask him? Send essays of about 200 words by June 18, including a phone number for verification, to Voices/Founders, The Inquirer, Box 41705, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101. Send e-mail to inquirer.letters@phillynews.com or faxes to 215-854-4483. Questions? Call Kevin Ferris, readers' editor, at 215-854-4543.
NEWS
December 14, 1999 | By Thomas Ginsberg, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
A decade after losing the fight over school prayer, New Jersey lawmakers returned to the classroom yesterday with a new idea: Make students recite the words of several Founding Fathers, including an excerpt from the Declaration of Independence, in class every day. The notion, endorsed by at least two Republican presidential candidates, appears to have a better chance of getting past the full legislature now, with new amendments, than it did...
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One nation under ... Bruce? The National Constitution Center would like to think so. The museum on Independence Mall more used to founding fathers and government branches announced Thursday it will be the only venue outside the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland to host a hugely popular Bruce Springsteen exhibit. "From Asbury Park to the Promised Land: The Life and Music of Bruce Springsteen," will run at the Center from Feb. 17 to Sept. 3, 2012. Tickets, which the museum expects (hopes)
NEWS
July 2, 1999 | by William C. Kashatus
On Sunday, Americans will celebrate the 223rd anniversary of our nation's birth. Those who pause to reflect on the significance of the holiday will undoubtedly recall that our Founding Fathers declared American independence from Great Britain on that day. And they will be wrong. In fact, July 4, 1776, was the day that the founders - delegates to the Second Continental Congress meeting at the Pennsylvania State House in Philadelphia - adopted Thomas Jefferson's Declaration of Independence.
NEWS
January 9, 1994 | By DAVID S. BRODER
In Seattle, where the federal office building bears the name of Washington's late, great senator, Henry M. Jackson, a hearing will be held on Tuesday that will help determine whether there will ever again be a career like Scoop Jackson's. Jackson served 12 years in the House of Representatives before moving over for a 30-year run in the Senate, which ended only with his death in 1983. He tried and failed to win the presidential nomination in 1976. But in the three decades he spent in the Senate, no man in government except the president had greater - or more positive - influence on the defense, energy and environmental policies of the United States than Scoop Jackson.
NEWS
June 13, 2003 | By Lee Winfrey and Jonathan Storm INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
David Brinkley, who brought wit, grace and skepticism to four decades as a network TV anchor and master of the Sunday talk show, died Wednesday night in Houston at age 82. Mr. Brinkley was one of the founding fathers of television journalism, a Sunday sage who redefined the possibilities of the political talk show. Only Edward R. Murrow and Walter Cronkite rank with Mr. Brinkley in the pantheon of TV news. And neither of them achieved the unique dominance that he did, starring on two networks in two formats.
NEWS
December 20, 1997 | By William C. Kashatus
When asked if he thought that posterity would forgive the founding fathers for neglecting the issue of slavery in their Declaration of Independence, Benjamin Franklin allegedly replied, "It doesn't matter; we won't hear a thing. We'll all be long gone. Besides, what will posterity think we were, demigods? We're men - no more, no less - trying to get a nation started against greater odds than a more generous God would have allowed. If it does matter, the history books will clean it up!"
NEWS
July 2, 1995 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two hundred and nineteen years ago, John Adams offered a prediction as to how future Americans would observe the Declaration of Independence. "I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary Festival," he wrote to his wife, Abigail, from Philadelphia. "It ought to be solemnized with Pomp and Parades, with Shews, Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other from this Time forward forever more.
NEWS
November 3, 2003
I'M NOT sure why I am amazed at the movement to have "one nation under God" removed from the Pledge of Allegiance. It seems that a small group in the country find it necessary to try to erase God from everything, and those of us who claim to believe in God have not stood up to say stop. The Founding Fathers - and Mothers - understood that without God, nothing is possible. There is not a day that any of us wake up under our own power. It is by the grace and mercy of God that this is possible.
NEWS
February 29, 2016
ISSUE | SUPREME COURT GOP owes it to citizens to fill bench The Republicans are denying citizens a cornerstone of our three branches of government. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the Senate Judiciary Committee will not consider any nominations to the Supreme Court ("A firm 'no' on court nominee," Wednesday). This refusal to fulfill our right to a complete court was never an intent of our Founding Fathers. Shame on you, McConnell. |Gail Scoufield, Philadelphia
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NEWS
August 30, 2016
By Caitlin Fitz Almost 200 years ago, as the United States approached its 50th birthday, a new baby name swept the nation. It wasn't biblical or even Anglophone. It was Bolivar . Hundreds of mothers and fathers, living in Kentucky log cabins or Illinois farmhouses, named their newborns after Spanish America's most celebrated revolutionary: Simon Bolivar of Venezuela. The baby Bolivar boom wasn't an isolated oddity, either. Other Americans named their new towns, their boats, and even their livestock Bolivar, adopting the Spanish-speaking revolutionary as one of their own. Given how much of our current election cycle has been marked by talk of border walls and racial slurs, it may seem surprising that ordinary Americans held such early affection for Latin America.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
David Cross does not look like a guy who would discuss sex in public. Clean-shaven and bespectacled, with a patriotic bow tie, white shirt, pressed khakis, and sensible close-cut hair, he is mild-mannered and soft-spoken - a seemingly gentle soul, for a one-time criminal lawyer. Yet, get him started, and Cross talks a blue streak about the sordid details of Philadelphia's most historic characters. Sure, he'll espouse the better-known virtues of our frisky founding fathers - the stuff of Benjamin Franklin and his prostitutes - but Cross can share the rarer tidbits, too. He'll speak about Gen. George Washington and his quest for the aphrodisiac Spanish Fly, and Thomas Jefferson's lustful ways with the local lionesses of Philadelphia society.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2016 | By Alexandra Villarreal, STAFF WRITER
Father's Day is Sunday, and Philadelphia boasts a number of opportunities to show Dad how much you care while also having a ball. One Liberty Observation Desk 10 a.m.-10 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, One Liberty Observation Deck , 1650 Market St., 57th Floor, 215-561-3325. If your father's big on heights and sights, he'll get free entry to One Liberty Observation Deck on Saturday and Sunday, when accompanied by one paid admission. If you're really ambitious, catch a free Philly From the Top tour between 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. Academy of Natural Sciences 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday, Academy of Natural Sciences , 1900 Ben Franklin Parkway,  215-299-1043.
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Jason Nark, Staff Writer
There's a stuffed bald eagle giving a wild turkey a little side eye at a museum on Independence Mall, a stern look of "Don't make me fly up there. " In the United States of America, the bald eagle is most definitely the boss, the symbol of our nation, even though Benjamin Franklin preferred the gobbler over that snowy-headed raptor. On June 20, 1782, the Second Continental Congress voted to make the bald eagle a national symbol, and 200 years later, President Ronald Reagan deemed June 20 "National Bald Eagle Day. " "Whether silhouetted against the sky on a rocky pinnacle in Alaska or soaring majestically overhead in Florida, the bald eagle is admired as one of nature's most spectacular creatures," Reagan said in a proclamation at the time.
NEWS
June 10, 2016
Even as Hillary Clinton's clinching of the Democratic presidential nomination heralded a historic opening of the nation's highest office to half the population, presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump was sounding a dramatic retreat from our halting, hard-won progress toward truly representative government. Having declared that a Mexican American U.S. district judge could not fairly consider complaints against Trump's nominal university because of his ethnicity, the candidate added that a Muslim jurist probably couldn't be trusted either.
NEWS
June 3, 2016
WILLIAM PENN once wrote that "governments, like clocks, go from the motion men give them. " Mayor Kenney moved Philadelphia a step forward this week by adding two important Muslim holy days to the official list of school holidays. Beginning in the 2017-18 school year, the district will be closed, so Muslim students and staff can observe Eid al-Fitr and Eid-al-Adha. The first marks the end of Ramadan, which is the Islamic holy month of fasting. The second celebrates the trials and triumph of the Prophet Ibrahim, known at Abraham in the Old Testament.
NEWS
May 9, 2016
As Alexander Hamilton enjoys a musical makeover and star turn on Broadway, hum along to the story of a truly musical treasury official: Francis Hopkinson, treasurer of the Continental Loan Office. Born in Philadelphia to a prominent family, Hopkinson (1737-1791) was a member of the first graduating class of the College of Philadelphia (now the University of Pennsylvania) in 1757. Before returning for an advanced degree, Hopkinson wrote "My Days Have Been So Wondrous Free," commonly regarded as the first secular musical composition by an American composer.
NEWS
March 2, 2016
ISSUE | SECURITY VS. PRIVACY Apple is right to oppose court order Apple CEO Tim Cook should continue resisting FBI overtures to circumvent the company's encryption software ("CEO defends Apple's stance," Sunday). If the company gave in and wrote a software program to access the content of a single terrorist's iPhone, who could assure us that the master key to unlocking data of Apple iPhones worldwide would not be abused? What if the software got into a terrorist's hands? Would accessing the data of one terrorist, now deceased, be worth giving a terrorist organization the ability to access every iPhone, including those with highly classified information?
NEWS
February 29, 2016
ISSUE | SUPREME COURT GOP owes it to citizens to fill bench The Republicans are denying citizens a cornerstone of our three branches of government. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said the Senate Judiciary Committee will not consider any nominations to the Supreme Court ("A firm 'no' on court nominee," Wednesday). This refusal to fulfill our right to a complete court was never an intent of our Founding Fathers. Shame on you, McConnell. |Gail Scoufield, Philadelphia
NEWS
February 25, 2016
ISSUE | ANTONIN SCALIA Obama failed us I taught my government students that one of the major roles of the president of the United States is chief citizen, representing all citizens of the country. In this role, President Obama should have attended the funeral of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia ("Scalia's life of faith is reflected," Sunday). When you attend a funeral, you are paying respects to the grieving family and showing them that you feel for their loss. Scalia spent decades interpreting the wonderful document that created this nation.
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