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Fox Chase Cancer Center

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NEWS
October 10, 1990 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / SHARON J. WOHLMUTH
Cancer survivors and their family and friends held a 20-mile bike ride Saturday, raising $3,000 for the Fox Chase Cancer Center. Cheryl and Clyde Croasdale, at left, get off their shared mount after finishing, and Ed McBlain, above, drinks water on a break near the Delaware. One hundred bikers joined the ride.
NEWS
March 14, 2009
Another legal roadblock to the expansion plans of Fox Chase Cancer Center makes it incumbent on the Nutter administration to work closely with officials on an alternative solution. The state Supreme Court ruled against Fox Chase's request for an expedited appeal of a lower court's decision that rejected the expansion. Cancer center officials had hoped a quick appeals process could put their construction project back on track. In December, Philadelphia Orphans Court Judge John W. Herron decided that Fox Chase cannot use 19.4 acres of 65-acre Burholme Park to expand its campus.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University Health System's Fox Chase Cancer Center has signed a memorandum of understanding with an Abu Dhabi hospital to explore the creation of a cancer center in the United Arab Emirates, the organizations said Thursday. Fox Chase officials plan to meet early next year with officials of Universal Hospital in Abu Dhabi to discuss the proposed collaboration, which would start with a bone-marrow transplant program at the privately owned hospital in the Middle East. Last month, in another example of the Philadelphia region exporting its health-care expertise, the University of Pennsylvania Health System announced a partnership with VPS Healthcare, also a privately owned health system based in the United Arab Emirates.
NEWS
November 10, 1988 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cancer specialist Timothy R. Talbot Jr., 72, died of cancer Monday at the Fox Chase Cancer Center, one of the country's premier cancer research and care facilities, which he had created 14 years ago. He was a resident of Haverford. As director of the Institute for Cancer Research in Fox Chase, a post he assumed in 1957, Dr. Talbot paved the way for the institute's merger in 1968 with the American Oncologic Hospital. In 1974, the facility became the Fox Chase Cancer Center. Dr. Talbot was its president until 1980.
NEWS
January 31, 2011 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doreen Benedict sought treatment for her breast cancer at Fox Chase Cancer Center, more than an hour from her home in Mount Laurel, based on the recommendation of a friend. While the Northeast Philadelphia hospital is happy to get such word-of-mouth publicity, starting Monday it wants prospective patients to know about an even more concrete source of information: Hard numbers on its website. Fox Chase is posting graphs that indicate how many of its patients were alive five years after treatment for four common cancers: breast, prostate, lung, and colorectal.
NEWS
December 11, 2008
A judge's ruling against Fox Chase Cancer Center's plans to expand into Burholme Park should prompt the city and the institution to find another solution. Philadelphia Orphans Court Judge John W. Herron decided that Fox Chase cannot use 19.4 acres of the 65-acre city park to expand its campus in the Northeast. The judge said state law requires the city to hold dedicated parkland in public trust for the community's use. City Council and Mayor Nutter in March approved Fox Chase's plans to use a portion of the park for a $1 billion expansion over 25 years.
NEWS
March 17, 2012 | Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University Health System revealed in a conference call that it has agreed to pay $83.8 million for the Fox Chase Cancer Center and immediately invest $30.9 million to expand Fox Chase into Temple's neighboring Jeanes Hospital. Health system president and chief executive Larry Kaiser, who arrived less than a year ago, has high expectations from the deal, announced in December, saying that his vision was for revenue at Fox Chase to reach $1 billion in five years, from $350 million in the year ended June 30. Temple had $994 million in revenue during the same period.
NEWS
January 3, 2001 | By Larry Lewis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Twice a week, Courtney Haviland, 16, travels to a cancer center above Cottman Avenue in Northeast Philadelphia to sort through piles of family medical histories. She believes that upgrading the medical histories doctors compile from patients could provide important hereditary clues to predicting who will get cancer. The junior at Abington Friends School in Montgomery County makes time in her crowded schedule to work as a student scientist at the renowned Fox Chase Cancer Center on Burholme Avenue because she wants to help others.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2004 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There is nothing outwardly flashy about the Fox Chase Cancer Center, nestled between residential neighborhoods and a community hospital in Northeast Philadelphia. But over the last century, the 100-bed specialty hospital and research institution have become a world-class center for cancer care and research. Fox Chase's quaint traditions - such as tea and cookies every afternoon at 3:30, which dates to 1943 - and low profile locally belie the powerhouse it has become. Now Fox Chase is launching an ambitious expansion plan to more than double its size over the next 20 years.
NEWS
January 23, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Nearly a week after Vice President Biden visited Philadelphia to announce a new federal "moon shot" to battle cancer, the heads of six leading Pennsylvania cancer centers and other experts gathered in Center City on Thursday to discuss treatment and prevention developments, and sort the promise from the hype. The six directors were panelists at "Cancer Precision Medicine, Big Ideas in Research, Treatment and Prevention," a half-day conference at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia.
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NEWS
January 29, 2016 | BY NICK CRISTIANO, Staff Writer
Like many of George Manney's friends and acquaintances, it seems, Charlie Gracie was shocked when he heard in December that the musician and Philadelphia-music maven had died at 64 of pancreatic cancer. "I didn't even know he was sick. He never told anybody," the still-vibrant rock-and-roll pioneer said from his home in Drexel Hill about the drummer who sometimes accompanied him. "We were friends for quite a few years. Very quiet guy and a hell of a drummer. When I got the news, I couldn't believe it. " Gracie, 79, who made some recordings at Manney's home studio in Northeast Philadelphia, in addition to using him as an accompanist, will be the closing act at a four-hour tribute show Sunday that is a testament to Manney's wide-ranging impact on the Philadelphia music community.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia will help VPS Healthcare, a health system based in the United Arab Emirates, establish "standard of excellence for pediatric care, the two organizations announced Wednesday. CHOP is the second Philadelphia health system to form an alliance with VPS, which was founded in 2007 by a radiologist, Shamsheer Vayalil. He remains the owner. In November, the University of Pennsylvania Health System has agreed to help VPS improve the care of patients with lifestyle-related disease, such as diabetes, and cancer.
NEWS
January 23, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Nearly a week after Vice President Biden visited Philadelphia to announce a new federal "moon shot" to battle cancer, the heads of six leading Pennsylvania cancer centers and other experts gathered in Center City on Thursday to discuss treatment and prevention developments, and sort the promise from the hype. The six directors were panelists at "Cancer Precision Medicine, Big Ideas in Research, Treatment and Prevention," a half-day conference at the College of Physicians of Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 12, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Excessive delays in breast cancer treatment may compromise patients' survival, according to two major studies published Thursday in JAMA Oncology. What's more, the women most likely to experience long delays were black or Hispanic, and one analysis found a correlation with lower incomes. One study, led by Fox Chase Cancer Center surgical oncologist Richard J. Bleicher, used patient information from two large federal databases to examine the impact on survival of delays in surgery for breast cancer that had not spread to distant organs.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University Health System's Fox Chase Cancer Center has signed a memorandum of understanding with an Abu Dhabi hospital to explore the creation of a cancer center in the United Arab Emirates, the organizations said Thursday. Fox Chase officials plan to meet early next year with officials of Universal Hospital in Abu Dhabi to discuss the proposed collaboration, which would start with a bone-marrow transplant program at the privately owned hospital in the Middle East. Last month, in another example of the Philadelphia region exporting its health-care expertise, the University of Pennsylvania Health System announced a partnership with VPS Healthcare, also a privately owned health system based in the United Arab Emirates.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Virtua, South Jersey's biggest health system, has entered into a partnership with Penn Medicine for cancer and neurosciences, the two tax-exempt systems announced Tuesday. Penn's Abramson Cancer Center will replace Fox Chase Cancer Center, and in a neurosciences collaboration, Penn doctors will operate at Virtua Memorial Hospital, in Mount Holly. Virtua has been sending certain stroke patients to Capital Health in Hopewell Township, N.J. Penn, the region's biggest health system, with about $5.3 billion in revenue, has many ties to community hospitals, but "this is a deeper relationship," said Ralph W. Muller, chief executive of the University of Pennsylvania Health System after the announcement at Virtua's Voorhees hospital.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University Health System posted a small operating profit of $3 million for the year ended June 30, 2015, its first annual operating gain since fiscal 2007, Temple officials said Thursday. CEO Larry Kaiser attributed the positive results to a shift toward higher-acuity care, a financial turnaround at Fox Chase Cancer Center, and a steep drop in professional liability costs. On a conference call with bond investors, Kaiser highlighted a surge in the number of transplants to 246 last year from 190 the year before and the year-old Fox Chase policy of giving people next-business-day appointments.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2015 | Jenny DeHuff, Daily News
Tune in tonight at 8 p.m. to see if Philly native Virgil Gadson continues in his quest to beat out 15 fellow contestants and move his way into viewers' hearts as America's Favorite Dancer on Fox's "So You Think You Can Dance. " Originally from Mount Airy with family in South Philly and West Oak Lane, Gadson is a graduate of the University of the Arts and performed at Freedom Theatre (1346 N. Broad St.), in North Philly. During a recent phone interview, Gadson said his experience on the show has had its ups and downs.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Irwin A. Rose, 88, an eminent biochemist at Fox Chase Cancer Center who shared the 2004 Nobel Prize in chemistry for codiscovering how cells break down unwanted proteins, died in his sleep ealry Tuesday at his son's home in Deerfield, Mass. The prize was shared with Avram Hershko and Aaron Ciechanover of the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa. Their work had a profound impact on the scientific world's understanding of cell division, DNA repair, and immune function. It also led other scientists to develop novel cancer therapies.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
YOU WON'T find Shane White, 18, a freshman at Holy Family University in Northeast Philadelphia, giving $5 haircuts, manicures or facials today at Bucks County Technical High School to raise money for City of Hope cancer research. But you will find him working the HopeCuts fundraiser at his Feasterville alma mater, supporting the 50 student barbers and cosmetologists trying to raise more than $10,000 for City of Hope like they did in a snowstorm last year. White's expertise is technology, not cosmetology, so he's been networking for months to spread the word about today's $5 HopeCuts, hoping a good crowd shows up from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. All the money goes to support the famous cancer-research hospital in Los Angeles that has clinical-trial research partnerships with Thomas Jefferson University and other Philadelphia hospitals.
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