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Fox Chase Cancer Center

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NEWS
October 10, 1990 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / SHARON J. WOHLMUTH
Cancer survivors and their family and friends held a 20-mile bike ride Saturday, raising $3,000 for the Fox Chase Cancer Center. Cheryl and Clyde Croasdale, at left, get off their shared mount after finishing, and Ed McBlain, above, drinks water on a break near the Delaware. One hundred bikers joined the ride.
NEWS
March 14, 2009
Another legal roadblock to the expansion plans of Fox Chase Cancer Center makes it incumbent on the Nutter administration to work closely with officials on an alternative solution. The state Supreme Court ruled against Fox Chase's request for an expedited appeal of a lower court's decision that rejected the expansion. Cancer center officials had hoped a quick appeals process could put their construction project back on track. In December, Philadelphia Orphans Court Judge John W. Herron decided that Fox Chase cannot use 19.4 acres of 65-acre Burholme Park to expand its campus.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University Health System's Fox Chase Cancer Center has signed a memorandum of understanding with an Abu Dhabi hospital to explore the creation of a cancer center in the United Arab Emirates, the organizations said Thursday. Fox Chase officials plan to meet early next year with officials of Universal Hospital in Abu Dhabi to discuss the proposed collaboration, which would start with a bone-marrow transplant program at the privately owned hospital in the Middle East. Last month, in another example of the Philadelphia region exporting its health-care expertise, the University of Pennsylvania Health System announced a partnership with VPS Healthcare, also a privately owned health system based in the United Arab Emirates.
NEWS
November 10, 1988 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cancer specialist Timothy R. Talbot Jr., 72, died of cancer Monday at the Fox Chase Cancer Center, one of the country's premier cancer research and care facilities, which he had created 14 years ago. He was a resident of Haverford. As director of the Institute for Cancer Research in Fox Chase, a post he assumed in 1957, Dr. Talbot paved the way for the institute's merger in 1968 with the American Oncologic Hospital. In 1974, the facility became the Fox Chase Cancer Center. Dr. Talbot was its president until 1980.
NEWS
January 31, 2011 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doreen Benedict sought treatment for her breast cancer at Fox Chase Cancer Center, more than an hour from her home in Mount Laurel, based on the recommendation of a friend. While the Northeast Philadelphia hospital is happy to get such word-of-mouth publicity, starting Monday it wants prospective patients to know about an even more concrete source of information: Hard numbers on its website. Fox Chase is posting graphs that indicate how many of its patients were alive five years after treatment for four common cancers: breast, prostate, lung, and colorectal.
NEWS
December 11, 2008
A judge's ruling against Fox Chase Cancer Center's plans to expand into Burholme Park should prompt the city and the institution to find another solution. Philadelphia Orphans Court Judge John W. Herron decided that Fox Chase cannot use 19.4 acres of the 65-acre city park to expand its campus in the Northeast. The judge said state law requires the city to hold dedicated parkland in public trust for the community's use. City Council and Mayor Nutter in March approved Fox Chase's plans to use a portion of the park for a $1 billion expansion over 25 years.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
When Temple University Health System bought Fox Chase Cancer Center in 2012, one goal was to balance Temple's role in North Philadelphia as the de facto public hospital for the poor with better-insured cancer patients. But first, Temple had to get Fox Chase's financial house in order. Temple appears to be well on its way to that goal, reporting that Fox Chase had an operating profit of $11.34 million last year after several money-losing years in a row. Thursday will mark another step in the rejuvenation of Fox Chase, with the official opening of an outpatient clinic for the Fox Chase-Temple University Hospital Bone Marrow Transplant Program on the fifth floor of Temple's Jeanes Hospital, right next door.
NEWS
March 17, 2012 | Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University Health System revealed in a conference call that it has agreed to pay $83.8 million for the Fox Chase Cancer Center and immediately invest $30.9 million to expand Fox Chase into Temple's neighboring Jeanes Hospital. Health system president and chief executive Larry Kaiser, who arrived less than a year ago, has high expectations from the deal, announced in December, saying that his vision was for revenue at Fox Chase to reach $1 billion in five years, from $350 million in the year ended June 30. Temple had $994 million in revenue during the same period.
NEWS
January 3, 2001 | By Larry Lewis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Twice a week, Courtney Haviland, 16, travels to a cancer center above Cottman Avenue in Northeast Philadelphia to sort through piles of family medical histories. She believes that upgrading the medical histories doctors compile from patients could provide important hereditary clues to predicting who will get cancer. The junior at Abington Friends School in Montgomery County makes time in her crowded schedule to work as a student scientist at the renowned Fox Chase Cancer Center on Burholme Avenue because she wants to help others.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2004 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There is nothing outwardly flashy about the Fox Chase Cancer Center, nestled between residential neighborhoods and a community hospital in Northeast Philadelphia. But over the last century, the 100-bed specialty hospital and research institution have become a world-class center for cancer care and research. Fox Chase's quaint traditions - such as tea and cookies every afternoon at 3:30, which dates to 1943 - and low profile locally belie the powerhouse it has become. Now Fox Chase is launching an ambitious expansion plan to more than double its size over the next 20 years.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 12, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Alfred G. Knudson Jr., 93, a longtime Fox Chase Cancer Center scientist and international expert on the genetics of cancer, died Sunday, July 10, at his home in Center City Philadelphia after an extended illness. He was best known for his groundbreaking "two-hit theory" on how cancer develops, which found it takes two "hits" or mutations to a gene for cancer to occur. The first hit may be hereditary; the other perhaps chemical exposure, radiation, or some other cause. He was one month shy of his 94th birthday.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
More than nine out of 10 doctors at the Hospital of the Fox Chase Cancer Center received payments from drug and medical-device firms in 2014, an analysis of Medicare payments data by ProPublica found. Its rate of 92 percent ranked Fox Chase highest in the Philadelphia region for the percentage of affiliated doctors accepting payments from pharmaceutical or medical-device firms, the data showed. Fox Chase, which ranked 10th nationally for its percentage of affiliated doctors receiving payments of any size, also had the region's highest percentage of doctors who collected at least $5,000.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Craig MacGregor feels betrayed - by his doctors, by the health-care system and, devastatingly, by his own fingers. For much of the last 40 years, he played bass for Foghat, the classic rock band best known for the hit "Slow Ride. " Now, his fingertips have grown bulbous - "clubbed," doctors call it, a side effect of chemotherapy to treat his advanced lung cancer. He can barely play music at all anymore. "Overnight, it's gone," he says. "That's a hard thing to accept. " Even harder: Though he didn't learn of his cancer until last year, it actually was first detected four years ago during a CAT scan to check for broken ribs after a fall.
NEWS
May 9, 2016 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
When Hee-Soon Juon asked her physician a few years ago whether she needed to be screened for exposure to the Hepatitis B virus, he told her, "You don't need to be. You're in the U.S.A. " But Hepatitis B is widespread in Asian and sub-Saharan African countries, including Juon's native South Korea, and many immigrants have brought it with them to the United States. Getting out the word is critical for two reasons: First, there is a vaccine to prevent transmission of the virus. Second, those who have already contracted it should seek early treatment to prevent potentially deadly consequences.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2016
Philadelphia FIGHT has named Barbara L. Bungy chief operating officer for its Community Health Centers. A member of FIGHT's board of directors since 2012, Bungy most recently served as secretary. She had been with Drexel University College of Medicine within the department of pediatrics at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children in several management positions, including as executive director for the Center of the Urban Child, HIV prevention services program manager. JDog Junk Removal & Hauling, a Berwyn firm working to increase career opportunities for military veterans, has named Marine Corps vet Kevin Kopa the national franchise's new vice president of quality assurance.
NEWS
March 13, 2016
On March 5, the Fox Chase Cancer Center board of associates, Main Line chapter, hosted its Night for the Fight at the Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr. The group of more than 600 volunteers supports patient care and cancer research at the Fox Chase Cancer Center. More than 180 attended the Main Line chapter's event, which included dinner, dancing to the band Slippery, and a silent auction. Along with the fun, more than $50,000 was raised to support research and patient care.  
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis and Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITERS
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf will undergo treatment for what he called a "mild" and treatable form of prostate cancer, but said it would not interfere with his job. In disclosing the illness Wednesday, Wolf, 67, did not offer details about his diagnosis or the treatment he expects in coming months. He said only that it would not require him to step aside, even temporarily. "It really was detected very early. So the procedure is going to be a truly minor one," the governor said at a Capitol news briefing, accompanied only by his wife, Frances.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Fox Chase Cancer Center has agreed to establish a bone-marrow transplant program with Universal Hospital in the United Arab Emirates, the two groups said Thursday. The new program will aim to provide care locally and regionally and include physician exchange programs, they said. Fox Chase, part of Temple University Health System, last week started seeing patients at a new outptient center for bone-marrow transplant patients at Jeanes Hospital. hbrubaker@phillynews.com 215-854-4651 @InqBrubaker
NEWS
February 20, 2016 | By Chad Terhune, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
As superbug outbreaks raised alarm across the country last year, a prominent doctor at Fox Chase Cancer Center wrote in a leading medical journal about how to reduce the risk of these often-deadly patient infections. Jeffrey Tokar, director of gastrointestinal endoscopy, pointed to recent outbreaks from contaminated medical scopes, and discussed steps doctors and hospitals could take to ensure patient safety, in his Sept. 22 article in the Annals of Internal Medicine. "Health-care facilities and providers should strive to establish an environment of open information exchange with patients about what is being done to maximize their safety," Tokar and his two coauthors wrote.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
When Temple University Health System bought Fox Chase Cancer Center in 2012, one goal was to balance Temple's role in North Philadelphia as the de facto public hospital for the poor with better-insured cancer patients. But first, Temple had to get Fox Chase's financial house in order. Temple appears to be well on its way to that goal, reporting that Fox Chase had an operating profit of $11.34 million last year after several money-losing years in a row. Thursday will mark another step in the rejuvenation of Fox Chase, with the official opening of an outpatient clinic for the Fox Chase-Temple University Hospital Bone Marrow Transplant Program on the fifth floor of Temple's Jeanes Hospital, right next door.
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