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Fragrance

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LIVING
July 21, 2006 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pam Coath has a funny habit of sticking her nose into things, but it's not other people's business she's after. Coath is a fragrance freak. She's crazy about scented flowers, especially roses, given to exclamations of "Wow!" and "Bang!" after breathing in the light, fruity scent of a butter-yellow rose known as Jude the Obscure. "Fragrance is number one for me," she says. Five years ago, when she moved to Wayne, Coath designed her new gardens with fragrance in mind. It's an idea that once enjoyed great favor among serious gardeners, especially the Victorians.
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | By Valerie Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Sanofi Bio-Industries Inc., a manufacturer of fragrances and food flavorings and ingredients, established its North American corporate headquarters at the Neshaminy Interplex in Trevose last month. The corporation, a division of Sanofi S.A. of Paris, was formed last year when the North American operations were merged. The corporation operates 10 plants in the United States, including a fruit-flavorings plant in Northeast Philadelphia. "We had several home bases, at each of the companies, until we consolidated the headquarters," said Carey Hutchison, president and chief executive office of Sanofi Bio-Industries.
NEWS
November 16, 1999 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
No snickering allowed. Just how, exactly, would one go about capturing the essence of New Jersey in a fragrance? Well, maybe you can snicker a little. Custom Essence, a fragrance company with an apparent sense of humor, was one of two dozen exhibitors hawking products at the Statehouse yesterday for "Made in New Jersey Day. " The company's idea of a New Jersey fragrance? "Jersey Tomato. " Smells like it, too. Just ask Gov. Whitman. "Yes!" she announced after taking a whiff of a tomato-scented candle.
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Fashion Writer
If anybody knows the perfume industry, it is Fred Hayman. A master showman and promotional genius, Hayman used ambition and vision to help establish the cachet that turned his Giorgio boutique and Rodeo Drive into a world-renowned shopping playground for the upper crust. When Hayman turned his razzle-dazzle Hollywood flair to the fragrance trade in 1981, he created the most phenomenal perfume in half a century - Giorgio. In marketing that powerfully sweet scent from this city that is intrinsically linked with the lifestyles of the rich and famous, Hayman revolutionized the perfume industry.
LIVING
December 13, 1994 | By Cheryl Squadrito, FOR THE INQUIRER
First she seduces you with her eyes, then a subtle, sexy smile. Locked on like a heat-seeking missile, she zooms in for her target. You don't stand a chance. The bouquet is intoxicating. "Hi there! Karl Lagerfeld has a new fragrance out. Would you like to try it?" she purrs. This beautiful, charming woman is offering you a whiff of Lagerfeld's Sun, Moon Stars - in other words, the promise of romance, allure and Brad Pitt swooning at your feet. But who are these well-dressed, great-smelling, come-to-life mannequins who spray, smile and share floor space with other holiday decorations in department stores?
LIVING
March 4, 2005 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Creating a great home, everyone knows, is about color, space and light. It's about choosing the right furniture, fabrics and accents. But more and more, people are using fragrance to evoke experience, express individuality, and set the right mood in their homes. It's not only a question of personal style. A growing body of research tells us that pleasant scents can make us happier, relaxed and more alert. "There are about 86 active studies validating the effect of odors on mood states," says Alan Hirsch, a neurologist and the director of the Smell and Taste Treatment and Research Center in Chicago.
FOOD
July 1, 1992 | By Andrew Schloss, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Sour cherries burst forth in full force several weeks later than sweet cherries, but they arrive just in time for the Fourth of July. And what could be a more appropriate Independence Day dessert than cherry pie? Though their season is short, sour cherries have a lot to offer. However, unlike the many fruits that are at their best uncooked, these cherries need some sweetening and a bit of cooking before they reach their taste peak. Tart as vinegar, with a faint perfume of fresh fruit when raw, all they need is a touch of sugar and a bit of cooking for the cherry fragrance and total fruit flavor to become overwhelming and unforgettable.
NEWS
October 27, 2008
Doctors are most concerned about exposures among pregnant women between their 8 and 15 weeks. During that period, a delicate balance of hormones directs the development of sex organs in the fetus. Experts say phthlates can be hard to find on the label because they are often used as a solvent for fragrances, and firms can simply list "fragrance. " DEP (diethyl phthalate): deoderant, frangrance, hair gel, hair moussse, hair spray, hand and body lotions. DBP (dibutyle phthalte)
NEWS
June 5, 1995 | For The Inquirer / SHARON GEKOSKI-KIMMEL
Robert Ballantine of Philadelphia savors the fragrance at the 42d Annual Rose Show of the West Jersey Rose Society. Five hundred varieties were judged and displayed yesterday at the Burlington Center Mall.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1996 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
Take pebbles found in a salt-water aquarium, slip them into a seductively light, cinnamony fragrance, and what do you get? RAKS. The day after Thanksgiving, Yeadon native Andre' Barnwell debuted his upscale men's fragrance (pronounced "rocks") at the Nordstrom store in the King of Prussia mall. Barnwell is the first African-American designer to sell his fragrance exclusively at Nordstrom. Barnwell started his business with $100 as a hobby seven years ago. "I developed the fragrance for my own personal use," he said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
What does Harcum College smell like? Flowery and sweet. Deep. A hint of lavender. That's its past. Its present? Sophisticated. Strong. Think: cashmere, leather, pear. And its future? Definitely fruity. Raspberry, orange, and a little bit of cherry - and rising fast. So says Alexandra Hilosky, the chemistry professor who, with help from students, developed Harcum's own fragrance line to celebrate the arts-and-sciences college's 100th birthday. They're calling it the "Scentennial Collection.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Al Haas, For The Inquirer
With its redesigned flagship, the 2014 S-Class, Mercedes-Benz is doing what it habitually does: reinventing the luxury sedan. There is a ton of fresh technology in this car that, history tells us, will emulate the Republican trickle-down theory and eventually become available in less expensive Mercedes models - and the rest of the industry. (An example: Electronic stability control was Mercedes' idea. It is now found in nearly every new car on the road.) To show off some of that new hardware and software, Mercedes built an automotive answer to the flight simulator at the site of a recent regional press introduction for the S-Class.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
If Brad Pitt wants me to douse my body in Chanel No. 5, then I will - even if he barely makes sense. The world's iconic women's fragrance kicked off its latest advertising campaign last month with a 31-second commercial featuring gray-templed Pitt mumbling nonsense.   "It's not a journey," Pitt says (so serious!). "Every journey ends, but we go on. The world turns and we turn with it. Plans disappear. Dreams take over . . . . " Is this a 12th-grade sonnet class or a TV ad?
NEWS
June 16, 2012 | By Virginia A. Smith and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What a great day for torturing roses! It's sunny and warm, sky's fluffy with clouds, and we're walking the 10-acre field in Chester County known as "rose hell. " Really, that's what they call it, because this is where several thousand roses are set in the ground and left alone to see which ones can take the heat — and humidity, drought, wind, frost, snow, fungus, bugs, and all else. At the end of three or four years, minimum, whatever's still standing has a shot at becoming the next big star of the rose world.
NEWS
November 5, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lil Wayne once again breathes the sweet, sweet smell of freedom, the Associated Press reports. The Grammy-winning rapper has emerged from famed New York bastille Rikers Island after doing eight months on a gun-possession charge, according to the NYC Department of Corrections. "FREE AT LAST!!!!!!!" the performer's manager, Cortez Bryant , tweeted Thursday morning. Lil Wayne is off to Miami for a big homecoming party Sunday. Life behind bars fazed Weezy not a whit. "I was never scared, worried nor bothered by the situation," he professed Tuesday on Weezythanxyou.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2010 | By Kathryn Canavan FOR THE INQUIRER
It's in the air. The main attraction at Longwood Gardens this month is invisible. Inside the monumental Kennett Square conservatory, dozens of visitors are nosing around searching for scents. The first thing you will notice as you enter "Making Scents: The Art and Passion of Fragrance" is a whiff of hyacinth that could stop you in your tracks. After you sniff it, you realize that you are standing in a hyacinth-lined gazebo shaped like a giant perfume bottle. "Making Scents" is a context switch for frequent visitors to Longwood, who are accustomed to a feast for the eyes with four acres of colorful indoor blooms.
NEWS
February 12, 2010 | By Mariana Greene, DALLAS MORNING NEWS
Don't call me a snob, but I don't want a dozen long-stemmed red roses for Valentine's Day. Flowers thrill me, but not the ubiquitous red roses. How did the American public get fixated on the red rose as the ultimate symbol of St. Valentine's Day, anyway? To me, the distinctive rose fragrance is as important as the visual display, but most cut roses today have had the fragrance bred out of them in favor of uniformity in shape and extended vase life. Balking at uniformity is what brought Englishman David Austin's eventual fame among gardeners around the world.
NEWS
October 27, 2008
Doctors are most concerned about exposures among pregnant women between their 8 and 15 weeks. During that period, a delicate balance of hormones directs the development of sex organs in the fetus. Experts say phthlates can be hard to find on the label because they are often used as a solvent for fragrances, and firms can simply list "fragrance. " DEP (diethyl phthalate): deoderant, frangrance, hair gel, hair moussse, hair spray, hand and body lotions. DBP (dibutyle phthalte)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2007 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
ACCORDING to TMZ.com, rapper Lil' Wayne was the headliner Sunday night at a "Stop the Violence" event in gunshot-plagued Wilmington, N.C. But when only 1,000 concertgoers showed up (tickets were $30-$40 and 3,000 were expected), Wayne, who had been paid only a portion of his fee up front, waited backstage for three hours hoping to see the rest of his cash walk through the gates. Eventually, about 80 sheriffs and police officers in attendance said they'd put up the remainder of Wayne's money themselves, if he could wait until yesterday, to get the rapper to perform.
LIVING
July 21, 2006 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pam Coath has a funny habit of sticking her nose into things, but it's not other people's business she's after. Coath is a fragrance freak. She's crazy about scented flowers, especially roses, given to exclamations of "Wow!" and "Bang!" after breathing in the light, fruity scent of a butter-yellow rose known as Jude the Obscure. "Fragrance is number one for me," she says. Five years ago, when she moved to Wayne, Coath designed her new gardens with fragrance in mind. It's an idea that once enjoyed great favor among serious gardeners, especially the Victorians.
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