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NEWS
November 10, 2006 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George Edward Preston, 92, who survived the Holocaust and afterward came to America, where he thrived, died of multiple organ failure Wednesday at home. He lived in Hyde Park near Wilmington. In 1985, Mr. Preston and his son, David Lee Preston, who was an Inquirer staff writer at the time, took a monthlong trip to France, the Soviet Union, Poland and Germany to revisit his past. The younger Preston wrote an article for Inquirer Magazine that chronicled the trip. The article was a finalist for the 1986 Pulitzer Prize in feature writing.
NEWS
July 15, 1989 | Inquirer photos by Michael S. Wirtz
It was a long distance between tables in the Bastille Day Waiters Race yesterday, but spurred by the lure of a trip to France, the service was great. Ali Niknam walked off with the prize on South Street by carrying a champagne split four fast blocks, then opening the bottle and pouring without spilling.
NEWS
August 6, 2004
Re Edward Dubin's response to Michele Malkin's column "The Milksops of Manila": Mr. Dubin, you are a coward, sir! If the U.S. turned tail and ran like our pathetic Phillipine friends, then you wouldn't have the freedom to voice your sorry opinion in this newspaper. I'll buy you a one-way ticket to France, where you belong, if you swear never to return. I served in the Army and it pains me to know I put my life on the line for the likes of you! Thomas M. Regan Narberth
SPORTS
July 1, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
BOCHUM, Germany - Although France and host Germany qualified for the Women's World Cup quarterfinals yesterday, only one team was celebrating before the two meet to decide which tops Group A. France eliminated Canada with a resounding 4-0 victory to advance for the first time, while Germany stumbled over the line with a hard-fought, 1-0 win over Nigeria. Like Canada in the earlier game, Nigeria needed at least a point to stay in the tournament, and its players were given extra incentive with their regular match bonus doubled if they managed to beat the tournament host.
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | By Sarah DiLorenzo and Johanna Decorse, Associated Press
TOULOUSE, France - Inspired by radical Islam and trained in Afghanistan, the gunman methodically killed French schoolchildren, a rabbi, and paratroopers, and faced down hundreds of police for 32 hours. Then he leaped out a window as he rained down gunfire and was fatally shot in the head. France will not be the same after Mohamed Merah, whose deeds - and death Thursday - could change how authorities track extremists, determine whether French Muslims face new stigmas, and even influence who becomes the next French president.
SPORTS
August 23, 2000 | by Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
After 18 years of making annual stops in Philadelphia, the women's professional tennis tour is relocating to Nice, France, next year. Vince Nicastro, athletic director at Villanova University, local home of the successful WTA Advanta Championships, confirmed a Sports Business Journal report that the tournament will move following the sale of the event by International Management Group to a French promoter. The 2000 Advanta event, which regularly draws many of the world's top 10 players, is scheduled for Nov. 6 to 12 at Villanova's Pavilion.
NEWS
July 7, 1991 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
One late afternoon in June 1969, I stumbled into the home of Alain and Annie Chabod. Fortunate moi. I was a high school exchange student. They were my "French family" - my surrogate parents for the summer - 20 years younger than my real set, better cooks and faster drivers. I came from a small town, a suburb of New York. They lived in a small town in France, or rather, two. They owned a castle - at least that is what it seemed to me - across from the Nestle chocolate factory in Pontarlier, a city in east-central France, about an hour's drive from Lausanne, Switzerland.
TRAVEL
February 9, 2015 | By William Ecenbarger, For The Inquirer
ST. LEON SUR VEZERE, France - It is a scene that might have been painted by Claude Monet - a gently flowing river with overhanging trees peering down at their own reflections, picnickers sitting primly on blankets in the grass, and on the far bank a bright-red poppy field. This village of about 200 inhabitants in an area east of Bordeaux known as the Dordogne is a postcard lost in the mail for a century - honey-colored stone houses joined by cobblestoned alleys - all of it overseen by a church with a square bell tower that has been offering Masses since 1150.
NEWS
March 4, 1987
The question before the special French court was dramatically simple: Would France appease or punish terrorism? In the dock (figuratively, since he refused to attend his trial) was Georges Ibrahim Abdallah, a leader of one of Beirut's terrorist gangs, the Lebanese Armed Revolutionary Faction. He was convicted of complicity in the 1982 murders of American and Israeli embassy attaches in Paris, and of an unsuccessful attempt in 1984 to assassinate the U.S. consul general in Strasbourg, France.
SPORTS
June 25, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
Greg LeMond, the three-time winner of the Tour de France, might not compete in this year's race. LeMond has fared poorly in recent races and his manager said yesterday it might be foolish for him to compete in France, where competition begins July 3. LeMond retired from the Route du Sud in southern France Wednesday night after trailing leader Eric Boyer by more than 40 minutes. LeMond, 32, has looked in poor condition since early in the season, and also withdrew from the Giro d'Italia when he was more than two hours behind leader Miguel Indurain.
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SPORTS
June 22, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sunday night, after another grueling journey to another off-the-radar tournament in another remote locale, Alexandra Riley will return to her hotel room and end Father's Day the way she ends most other days, by texting "Good Night!" to her father. The nightly ritual helps ease both her father's concerns and the isolation the Philadelphia-born pro feels as, all alone, she chases her tennis dream across the globe. For seven years now, since she was 17, "Xan" Riley has been a solo tennis nomad.
NEWS
June 3, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frances Celano DiMaria, 91, of Glendora, who retired in the mid-1990s as a clerk-typist for the former Defense Personnel Support Center in South Philadelphia, died Friday, May 29, at Kennedy University Hospital in Washington Township. Born in Palermo, Italy, she immigrated when she was a preschooler with her family to South Philadelphia, where the family lived near Seventh and Tasker Streets. Mrs. DiMaria graduated from South Philadelphia High School for Girls in 1942, and worked as a sewing machine operator for a manufacturer of baby clothing in Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
How does an antique black carriage used by the wife of Napoleon III to flee Paris in 1870 figure prominently in the 100th anniversary of a dental school's flagship building? You might be surprised. Philadelphia native Thomas W. Evans was perhaps the most famous dentist of the 19th century. He endeared himself to Emperor Napoleon III and his wife, Empress Eugénie, as both doctor and confidant. And when Napoleon was captured in 1870 during the Battle of Sedan, Evans lent his carriage to help the fallen leader's wife escape angry mobs who were trying to overthrow the government.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
When it comes to nuclear negotiations with Iran, which are nearing a June 30 deadline, those who want a solid deal should be saying Vive la France! The French are taking the toughest stand of any of the six countries (known as the P5+1) that are negotiating with Tehran. Paris insists that any accord must permit continuing inspections of all Iranian nuclear installations, including military sites. This demand has been put forward by the entire P5+1 (the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council plus Germany)
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
LYON, France - Cheering audiences, rhythmic clapping, stamping feet, and other signs of adoration on its Europe 2015 tour don't excuse the Philadelphia Orchestra from the front lines of music outreach. The morning after the orchestra's raucously successful Lyon debut, players took to streets that, at least on Saturday, could be a bit mean. Three contingents set up shop to play chamber music, the most civilized setting being the courtyard of the Lyon Museum of Fine Arts, which offered acoustics-enhancing walls and appreciative tour-group audiences who not only stopped to listen but, between movements, talked about family members who had attended Temple University.
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF YOU WANT to live more than 100 years, the key word just might be love . That's what Frances Vann Lewis would have told you. When asked to what she attributed her long life, she had one simple answer: "Love everybody. " Not always a simple assignment in a world of increasing stress, you might say, but Frances - called "Nana" by friends and family - would have insisted on it. After all, she did it. Frances Vann Lewis, who worked for a Horn & Hardart restaurant on South Broad Street and for the former Graduate Hospital, a devoted churchwoman and family matriarch, died Friday at age 102. She was living in the Riverside Presbyterian Apartments in Center City, but had lived most of her life in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 17, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Frances Galante's home, a portrait she painted of the Maine countryside hangs prominently. It's the kind of work that would stop visiting friends. Some would ask questions; most would admire. Ms. Galante always would be humble. "She would say, 'My paintings aren't that great,' or, 'This still needs work,' " said Linda Galante, her sister. "But I know so many people who would look at her art and start crying because it was so moving. " Ms. Galante, 57, a prominent painter in the region, died Tuesday, March 10, in her Philadelphia home after a long battle with ovarian cancer.
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
They grew up near each other on Webster Street in Riverside. After they began dating, they walked together from home to Riverside High School. And when he went off to combat in France in World War II, their letters filled the silence. When he returned, they were together again. For decade after decade. On Monday, March 9, Michael Chiaccio, 92, municipal clerk and tax collector for Riverside Township from June 1960 to December 1989, died at Virtua Memorial Hospital - two days after his wife, Elizabeth D'Alessandro Chiaccio, 89, died there.
TRAVEL
February 9, 2015 | By William Ecenbarger, For The Inquirer
ST. LEON SUR VEZERE, France - It is a scene that might have been painted by Claude Monet - a gently flowing river with overhanging trees peering down at their own reflections, picnickers sitting primly on blankets in the grass, and on the far bank a bright-red poppy field. This village of about 200 inhabitants in an area east of Bordeaux known as the Dordogne is a postcard lost in the mail for a century - honey-colored stone houses joined by cobblestoned alleys - all of it overseen by a church with a square bell tower that has been offering Masses since 1150.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | BY BENEDICTE CLOUET
WHETHER YOU agree with Charlie Hebdo 's editorial line - or whether, until Wednesday, you'd even heard the name - is not the point. When armed terrorists burst into the office of the satirical French weekly famous for its irreverence and killed 12 people, they assassinated some of France's greatest cartoonists: Cabu, Wolinski, Charb and Tignous. These are household names in my country. They were people I grew up reading, people who all their life fought for the freedom of expression and their right to use it for satirical purposes, people who are now being mourned in France and beyond for what they represented.
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