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Frank Furness

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NEWS
December 14, 2012 | BY PETE MAZZACCARO, For the Daily News
  ONCE DISMISSED FOR his eccentric designs, Philadelphia architect Frank Furness has been celebrated around the city this year to mark the 100-year anniversary of his death. Furness created some of Philadelphia's most iconic buildings, including the Fisher Fine Art Library at the University of Pennsylvania and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts on Broad Street, which is hosting a retrospective about him through Dec. 30. The centennial celebration series is called "Revolutionary Philly: Making Buildings Out of his Head," referencing a comment his contemporary, architect Louis Sullivan, made about Furness - that his designs seemed to spring straight from his imagination, not the architectural trends or conventions of the time.
NEWS
September 15, 2012 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Philadelphia architect Frank Furness died in 1912, broken and out of fashion, and things only went downhill from there. His hometown soon came to revile his work. By the time historians and architects began to rediscover his genius in the 1960s, many of his finest buildings were already reduced to dust. The long climb back to a place of honor will culminate today when his admirers dedicate a historic marker in front of the house where he was born, at 1426 Pine St. The event, which kicks off celebrations for the centenary of his death, promises to be an unusually festive one. Furness, like his buildings, has a reputation as a brooding figure, a Dark Knight of architecture.
NEWS
October 23, 1998 | By Stephanie A. Stanley, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The planned demolition of a Frank Furness carriage house was canceled yesterday - for now. Ted Goldsborough, president of the Lower Merion Historic District, received the news at 7:30 a.m. after two weeks in which he and other Lower Merion historic preservationists mounted a hasty campaign to save the dwelling. Believing that demolition would come this week, the group had planned to gather at the historic tract in protest yesterday. That was canceled, too - for now. "I can't be more pleased that [the owner]
REAL_ESTATE
January 13, 1991 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although they've lived at their Woodpecker Lane address in Jenkintown since 1955, it wasn't until seven years ago that Leon and Mary Jane Clemmer were certain that their dwelling was designed by Frank Furness. "For years there was a story that Horace Trumbauer did it for Percy Madeira," a hunting partner of Theodore Roosevelt's, as a garage and stables, said Leon Clemmer, an architect whose office is in Elkins Park. "In fact, Trumbauer did some sketches for Madeira and included them among a list of his works at the Athenaeum" of Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2001 | By ANNE R. FABBRI For the Daily News
Scintillating exhibitions are bursting out of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts this summer. "American Spectrum: Paintings and Sculpture from the Smith College Museum of Art," a treasure trove of 75 choice pieces covering three centuries of American art history, is filled with unexpected delights. The exhibition begins in the rear gallery with early portraits by John Singleton Copley and itinerant limners who prepared most of the compositions in advance, putting in the individual's characteristics when they received a commission.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2001 | By ANNE R. FABBRI For The Daily News
MORRIS GALLERY of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts welcomes Virgil Marti and his site-specific art. Look forward to an excellent display because Marti, 39, is an artist whose work is always outstanding. The installation will open your eyes to design potential and the multiplicity of its references. In a gallery where Frank Furness' architecture has dominated the art, Marti will transform the interior design's details into his own statement. In the center is a red candlelike formation, seemingly growing out of and melting onto the floor.
NEWS
November 17, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Lynch, best known for his often-enigmatic and quirky films - think Eraserhead (1977), Blue Velvet (1986), and Inland Empire (2006) - and television shows ( Twin Peaks ), launched his career as a visual artist in the late 1960s at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Though he was not from Philadelphia, Lynch fell in love with the city during his years here as a student artist. "There was violence and hate and filth," he once said. "But the biggest influence in my whole life was that city.
NEWS
February 25, 1999 | By Stephanie A. Stanley, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
State historic-preservation officials have joined local activists in urging Bryn Mawr Hospital to reconsider its plans to demolish a century-old building on its campus. In a letter sent to the hospital earlier this month, the director of the Pennsylvania Bureau for Historic Preservation, Brenda Barrett, said the Gerhard Building met criteria necessary for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places and was a historic resource worthy of preservation. Barrett urged the hospital to "strongly consider" saving the Gerhard Building as a part of its planned development of the campus and offered the bureau's services to discuss ways of preserving it. "The building is locally significant as the first building used for clinical care at Bryn Mawr Hospital," Barrett wrote in the Feb. 12 letter.
NEWS
March 26, 1989 | By Charlotte Kidd, Special to The Inquirer
Affixed to a rickety door on the deteriorated SEPTA train station is a sign that reads, "This building has been found dangerous by the building inspector. " That's no news to Conshohocken commuters. But the borough's official action prompted SEPTA to schedule a wrecking crew to level the brick station within the next two months. Train service will not be affected. Right now the doors to the small station are padlocked, the windows boarded up. But a month ago, Conshohocken police on patrol found the building open, according to Borough Councilman Charles Kelly.
NEWS
January 26, 1995 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Someone has stepped forward to rescue the historic 700 block of Walnut Street, but plans to use the old Philadelphia Savings Fund Society headquarters as the lobby for a luxury condominium tower come with a catch. The plan calls for dismantling part of a bank renovation made nearly 100 years ago by renowned architect Frank Furness, and demolishing three early- 19th-century brick homes, known as York Row. All four buildings are historically certified by the city, and preservationists are sounding early alarms.
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NEWS
November 17, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Lynch, best known for his often-enigmatic and quirky films - think Eraserhead (1977), Blue Velvet (1986), and Inland Empire (2006) - and television shows ( Twin Peaks ), launched his career as a visual artist in the late 1960s at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Though he was not from Philadelphia, Lynch fell in love with the city during his years here as a student artist. "There was violence and hate and filth," he once said. "But the biggest influence in my whole life was that city.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Not so long ago, Harry Philbrick was climbing the grand staircase at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts when he looked up and noticed senior curator Robert Cozzolino toiling away on his computer in a small suite of offices off the broad first landing. "To tell you the truth, that was what gave me the idea," Philbrick, museum director, said the other day. "I thought, 'Why do we have our curators on display?' " No more. Curators have vacated the old three-room suite in the Frank Furness-designed National Historic Landmark building at Broad and Cherry Streets.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | BY PETE MAZZACCARO, For the Daily News
  ONCE DISMISSED FOR his eccentric designs, Philadelphia architect Frank Furness has been celebrated around the city this year to mark the 100-year anniversary of his death. Furness created some of Philadelphia's most iconic buildings, including the Fisher Fine Art Library at the University of Pennsylvania and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts on Broad Street, which is hosting a retrospective about him through Dec. 30. The centennial celebration series is called "Revolutionary Philly: Making Buildings Out of his Head," referencing a comment his contemporary, architect Louis Sullivan, made about Furness - that his designs seemed to spring straight from his imagination, not the architectural trends or conventions of the time.
NEWS
September 15, 2012 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Philadelphia architect Frank Furness died in 1912, broken and out of fashion, and things only went downhill from there. His hometown soon came to revile his work. By the time historians and architects began to rediscover his genius in the 1960s, many of his finest buildings were already reduced to dust. The long climb back to a place of honor will culminate today when his admirers dedicate a historic marker in front of the house where he was born, at 1426 Pine St. The event, which kicks off celebrations for the centenary of his death, promises to be an unusually festive one. Furness, like his buildings, has a reputation as a brooding figure, a Dark Knight of architecture.
LIVING
July 27, 2007 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Bob and Aggie Kennedy traded their 1,500-square-foot rowhouse at bustling Third and Bainbridge Streets for a rambling 1851 Victorian in tranquil Riverton. "We wanted something a little bigger," Bob Kennedy says as he studies the house from the sidewalk on a hot July morning. (Actually, it's about four times larger than the Philadelphia abode the couple left more than eight years ago.) "We wanted a Victorian with a garage, and a nice, big kitchen, and air conditioning - you know, something that was finished," says Bob, a consulting engineer.
NEWS
August 26, 2005 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In just a decade or so, two commercial towers on Cherry Street have evolved into a miniature fine-arts version of Jewelers' Row, a community of about 40 artists, galleries, co-ops, and related merchants. Anchoring the community a half-block west, on the other side of Broad Street, is the past: the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and its landmark Victorian Gothic home, designed by Frank Furness and George W. Hewitt. Yet across 13th Street to the east is the encroaching future: the stylish, modern Convention Center, whose expansion to Broad in 2008 seals the fate of the 104-year-old Gilbert Building and the galleries and studios inside.
NEWS
April 10, 2005 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Tucked away off busy Ardmore Avenue is St. Mary's Episcopal Church, a quiet, small, stone church with hidden treasures. The church, built in 1895, was designed by noted Philadelphia architect Frank Furness, and some of its stained-glass windows, including three depicting the Annunciation, were created by the famed Tiffany studios in 1904. Over the decades, though, cracked drainage pipes in the roof have caused crumbling mortar and rotting wood. Determined to protect its treasures, the congregation has embarked on a $600,000 capital campaign to fix the roof and do other updating.
NEWS
December 3, 2003 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To the dismay of some of the city's most prominent architects, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts intends to punch a hole in the entrance-hall floor of its landmark 1876 building to accommodate stairs from a proposed tunnel. The tunnel would connect the academy's Hamilton Building on the northwest corner of Broad and Cherry Streets with the historic Frank Furness-designed building directly across the street. Plans by architect Peter M. Saylor call for a tunnel under Cherry, with stairs coming up beneath the grand entry staircase that takes visitors to the second floor of the Furness building.
REAL_ESTATE
August 26, 2001 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Many people know where East Gowen Avenue is, if you mention the beer distributorship at its intersection with Germantown Avenue. But there is a new way to identify East Gowen, which stretches a half mile between Germantown and Stenton Avenues in East Mount Airy: The prettiest street in Philadelphia. Or so says Victorian Homes magazine, whose editor, Erika Kotite, visited this year and gave it that designation in an article in the magazine's August issue. Alex Humes, who owns a house on the street and is a member of the Victorian Society of America, sent photographs of East Gowen Avenue to Kotite to get her interested.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2001 | By ANNE R. FABBRI For the Daily News
Scintillating exhibitions are bursting out of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts this summer. "American Spectrum: Paintings and Sculpture from the Smith College Museum of Art," a treasure trove of 75 choice pieces covering three centuries of American art history, is filled with unexpected delights. The exhibition begins in the rear gallery with early portraits by John Singleton Copley and itinerant limners who prepared most of the compositions in advance, putting in the individual's characteristics when they received a commission.
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