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Frank Locascio

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NEWS
April 15, 1992 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
Some observers are calling it the Black Gotti Trial. Like the recently concluded marathon trial of flamboyant New York Mafia boss John Gotti and co-defendant Frank Locascio in Brooklyn, the federal court trial here of three Junior Black Mafia members has been replete with murder plots, organization charts and sometimes fascinating details about the lifestyles of the rich and infamous. And like the New York trial, the sideshow here - the family and friends of the defendants and the court watchers and merely curious - has at times been as interesting as the testimony.
NEWS
February 4, 1992 | Compiled from Daily News wire service reports
NEW YORK GOTTI PREDICTS ACQUITTAL John Gotti, reputed head of the Gambino crime family, confidently predicted during a break in his racketeering trial yesterday he will be acquitted. Gotti, 51, also complained to co-defendant and alleged Gambino underboss Frank Locascio, 59, about prosecutor John Gleeson's single-minded determination to put both of them in jail for life. Said Gotti of Gleeson: "This guy, you know what he says to his wife when he gets up in the morning?
NEWS
December 13, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
The wipeout of leading East Coast mob figures continues, with the cracking of the Philadelphia crime family, and the defection of many of its members, playing a leading role. The latest chapter was the indictment in Brooklyn yesterday of John Gotti, head of the Gambino crime family - the nation's biggest and most important. A Philadelphia mobster, Philip "Crazy Phil" Leonetti, ex-underboss to his uncle, Nicodemo Scarfo, apparently provided key testimony leading to the grand jury's action against Gotti; his underboss, Frank Locascio; his consigliere, Salvatore Gravano; and one of his captains, Thomas Gambino, also noted as the son of the crime family's founder, the late Carlo Gambino.
NEWS
March 7, 1992 | by Kathy Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
If you believe John Gotti's defense, "Sammy the Bull" Gravano didn't need help from the mob boss or anybody else to run his scams or kill his victims. Under cross examination yesterday by Gotti's lawyer, Albert Krieger, Salvatore Gravano, the former underboss-turned-government baritone, admitted having large stakes in a New York City construction business that brought him a $770,000 salary in 1989. "I was in pretty good shape," Gravano answered modestly after Krieger asked him whether he was wealthy.
NEWS
January 22, 1992 | by Gene Mustain and Jerry Capeci, New York Daily News
Looking as though he were just back from a week at the beach, accused murderer John Gotti strode into a Brooklyn courtroom yesterday accustomed to winning - even though his day began with a loss. As his fourth and most serious trial in seven years began, Gotti was as swaggering and dapper as ever as he smiled at potential jurors, exchanged private quips with his lawyers and teased members of the media. He gave no sign that he had come from prison and that for him the trial had started badly.
NEWS
December 13, 1990 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philip Leonetti, formerly second in command of Nicodemo Scarfo's Philadelphia organized crime family, will play a key role in the forthcoming trial of reputed mob boss John Gotti, law enforcement officials said yesterday. Leonetti, a star witness on the trial circuit since he became a government informer last year, will testify that Gotti boasted of orchestrating the 1985 killing of Mafia kingpin Paul Castellano so Gotti could ascend to the head of the Gambino organized crime family, according to federal investigators.
NEWS
April 6, 1992 | By George Anastasia and Emilie Lounsberry, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Two weeks ago, when the prosecution rested in the highly publicized John Gotti racketeering trial in Brooklyn, the flamboyant New York mob boss threw out a rhetorical question for defense attorneys and the media. "What happened to Leonetti?" Gotti asked. "Where's this Leonetti?" Where, indeed. Philip Leonetti, the Atlantic City mobster-turned-government informant, was once touted as the premier witness in the Gotti case. But he never got closer than standby status in the controversial trial that ended last week with the convictions of Gotti and co-defendant Frank Locascio.
NEWS
June 24, 1992 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mafia boss John Gotti went quietly yesterday, politely declining to comment before a federal judge sentenced him to life in prison on mob-related racketeering and murder charges. Hundreds of Gotti supporters, however, had plenty to say. Gathering in a park across from the U.S. District Courthouse in Brooklyn, they staged a boisterous and sometimes violent rally in support of the celebrity gangster who, absent a successful appeal, will spend the rest of his life behind bars.
NEWS
March 27, 1992 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Through it all, John Gotti smiled. And swaggered. And thumbed his nose at the government. For nine weeks, the reputed mob boss wisecracked his way through one of the biggest organized-crime trials in history. On Wednesday, the last day of testimony in the highly publicized case, he was at it again. After Judge I. Leo Glasser refused to permit defense attorneys to call six of seven potential rebuttal witnesses, Gotti quipped, "What happened to our defense? Maybe I shudda put on a little song-and-dance.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carlo Gambino, the Mafia's last real "boss of all bosses," was a quiet and circumspect man who rarely discussed his business. In fact, Gambino's caution was the stuff of mob folklore. It was common knowledge in underworld circles that the old man never spoke on the telephone because he feared government wiretaps. Even in face-to-face conversations, he often limited his comments to a nod or a shrug, a frown or a smile. Gambino, boss of the powerful New York Mafia family that still bears his name, died peacefully at 75, without ever spending any serious time in prison.
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NEWS
June 24, 1992 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mafia boss John Gotti went quietly yesterday, politely declining to comment before a federal judge sentenced him to life in prison on mob-related racketeering and murder charges. Hundreds of Gotti supporters, however, had plenty to say. Gathering in a park across from the U.S. District Courthouse in Brooklyn, they staged a boisterous and sometimes violent rally in support of the celebrity gangster who, absent a successful appeal, will spend the rest of his life behind bars.
NEWS
April 15, 1992 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
Some observers are calling it the Black Gotti Trial. Like the recently concluded marathon trial of flamboyant New York Mafia boss John Gotti and co-defendant Frank Locascio in Brooklyn, the federal court trial here of three Junior Black Mafia members has been replete with murder plots, organization charts and sometimes fascinating details about the lifestyles of the rich and infamous. And like the New York trial, the sideshow here - the family and friends of the defendants and the court watchers and merely curious - has at times been as interesting as the testimony.
NEWS
April 6, 1992 | By George Anastasia and Emilie Lounsberry, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Two weeks ago, when the prosecution rested in the highly publicized John Gotti racketeering trial in Brooklyn, the flamboyant New York mob boss threw out a rhetorical question for defense attorneys and the media. "What happened to Leonetti?" Gotti asked. "Where's this Leonetti?" Where, indeed. Philip Leonetti, the Atlantic City mobster-turned-government informant, was once touted as the premier witness in the Gotti case. But he never got closer than standby status in the controversial trial that ended last week with the convictions of Gotti and co-defendant Frank Locascio.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carlo Gambino, the Mafia's last real "boss of all bosses," was a quiet and circumspect man who rarely discussed his business. In fact, Gambino's caution was the stuff of mob folklore. It was common knowledge in underworld circles that the old man never spoke on the telephone because he feared government wiretaps. Even in face-to-face conversations, he often limited his comments to a nod or a shrug, a frown or a smile. Gambino, boss of the powerful New York Mafia family that still bears his name, died peacefully at 75, without ever spending any serious time in prison.
NEWS
March 27, 1992 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Through it all, John Gotti smiled. And swaggered. And thumbed his nose at the government. For nine weeks, the reputed mob boss wisecracked his way through one of the biggest organized-crime trials in history. On Wednesday, the last day of testimony in the highly publicized case, he was at it again. After Judge I. Leo Glasser refused to permit defense attorneys to call six of seven potential rebuttal witnesses, Gotti quipped, "What happened to our defense? Maybe I shudda put on a little song-and-dance.
NEWS
March 8, 1992 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He shot his way to the top of the mob and then used fear and intimidation to solidify his hold on power. He carried himself like a movie star, a celebrity gangster who loved the attention and the spotlight. He wore expensive clothes. Rode in a big, flashy car. And surrounded himself with a cadre of Mafia sycophants, hit men who were also yes men. Several years ago that was the profile of Nicodemo "Little Nicky" Scarfo, the organized-crime kingpin of Philadelphia. Last week, based on testimony and evidence in federal court in Brooklyn, it was the picture of John Gotti.
NEWS
March 7, 1992 | by Kathy Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
If you believe John Gotti's defense, "Sammy the Bull" Gravano didn't need help from the mob boss or anybody else to run his scams or kill his victims. Under cross examination yesterday by Gotti's lawyer, Albert Krieger, Salvatore Gravano, the former underboss-turned-government baritone, admitted having large stakes in a New York City construction business that brought him a $770,000 salary in 1989. "I was in pretty good shape," Gravano answered modestly after Krieger asked him whether he was wealthy.
NEWS
March 5, 1992 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They wear pin-striped suits, long-collared shirts, floral ties and shiny loafers. They arrive together before the start of each morning's session and take up assigned seats in the front two rows. And when John Gotti is escorted into the courtroom, they extend to him a courtesy usually reserved only for the judge and the jury. They rise as one and stand quietly at attention. Once Gotti is comfortably in his chair, they all sit down. The first two rows behind the defense table at perhaps the most important Mafia trial in this city's long and storied history is reserved for Gotti's family - and both sides attend.
NEWS
February 4, 1992 | Compiled from Daily News wire service reports
NEW YORK GOTTI PREDICTS ACQUITTAL John Gotti, reputed head of the Gambino crime family, confidently predicted during a break in his racketeering trial yesterday he will be acquitted. Gotti, 51, also complained to co-defendant and alleged Gambino underboss Frank Locascio, 59, about prosecutor John Gleeson's single-minded determination to put both of them in jail for life. Said Gotti of Gleeson: "This guy, you know what he says to his wife when he gets up in the morning?
NEWS
January 22, 1992 | by Gene Mustain and Jerry Capeci, New York Daily News
Looking as though he were just back from a week at the beach, accused murderer John Gotti strode into a Brooklyn courtroom yesterday accustomed to winning - even though his day began with a loss. As his fourth and most serious trial in seven years began, Gotti was as swaggering and dapper as ever as he smiled at potential jurors, exchanged private quips with his lawyers and teased members of the media. He gave no sign that he had come from prison and that for him the trial had started badly.
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