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Frank Sinatra

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NEWS
April 28, 1987 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
For 10 years, Sid Mark played nothing but Sinatra on his weekly radio show. Sinatra's people loved it and kept calling from the Coast. "What can we do for you, Sid?" they asked. "You want a TV, a couple extra records?" Sid wanted only one thing - to meet Frank. "Sure, kid, sure," Sinatra's people would say. But Frank never called. In 1966, Mark got an early release of a new Sinatra album and played it continuously for two days. A local record store sold out its 200 advance copies in one day, restocked overnight and sold out again the next day. Sinatra heard about it and went wild.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1986 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
After almost 50 years of plying his trade, Frank Sinatra still calls himself a simple "saloon singer. " Yet to these respectful ears, he's a national treasure, and also, I fear, something of an endangered species - the first and last of a vanishing breed. For who else will sing the great songs of the 1930s and '40s and '50s, the works of the Rodgers and Harts, Johnny Mercers and the (recently departed) Harold Arlens, when Sinatra is gone? Linda Ronstadt? Carly Simon?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2011
Phillippe Sinatra Ryan Phillippe also has a fascination - formerly an obsession - with Frank Sinatra. "I didn't date much in high school," he said, "and when I was 16 I used to drive around in my dad's pickup on Friday night and listen to Sid Mark. " A particular fan of Ol' Blue Eyes' 1950s period, "when his voice and swagger peaked," Phillippe named his daughter Ava (after Sinatra love Ava Gardner) and his bulldog, who passed away last year, Frank. He became this macho icon, Phillippe said of his idol, and he started as "a little runt of a guy from Hoboken.
NEWS
January 2, 1991 | BY RICHARD IACONELLI
Can it be that Frank Sinatra is 75? The finger-snapping Frankie, who began his career before Elvis was born, continues to please audiences at an age when most people settle into a rocking chair. Hardly a day goes by that Sinatra's sound doesn't appear in my head - unexpected, but like an old friend, hardly unwelcome. When a mood darkens, some people call on a mantra, or count to 10; I recall "A Foggy Day" or "World On A String" and the skies lighten. It's a wondrous quality how some entertainers - Satchmo, Caruso, Judy Garland, for instance - have worn their hearts on their sleeves and given joy and inspiration to an audience.
NEWS
August 30, 1986 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (The Associated Press, United Press International, the Washington Post and the New York Times contributed to this report.)
A rumor that's been around since spring was confirmed yesterday when Frank Sinatra's manager announced that the singer would give a concert on Sept. 27 in Milan, his first performance in Italy in 23 years. No word on where he'll sing, but the story in April was that negotiations were under way to have him appear at La Scala. Sinatra, accompanied by a 40-piece orchestra, will play Milan after a two-day gig in Madrid's Bernabeau soccer stadium. NELSON'S SUIT Kristin Nelson, divorced wife of Rick Nelson, and their four children have filed a wrongful death suit against three companies in connection with the Dec. 31 ariplane crash that killed the singer in Texas.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1989 | By David Hinckley, New York Daily News
It was a struggling band with an unknown vocalist that trooped into a Brunswick Records studio in New York 50 years ago this week to cut a pair of sides called "From the Bottom of My Heart" and "Melancholy Mood. " They left still struggling; the disc sold only 8,000 copies. But shed no tears. The Harry James Orchestra went on to have nine No. 1 hits, and the unknown vocalist, Frank Sinatra, went on to sing better than almost anyone else in his century. Furthermore, young as Sinatra's first recorded-and-released vocals sound today, the seeds were already there.
LIVING
March 8, 1994 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story contains information from the Associated Press and the New York Times
Frank Sinatra rested at his Rancho Mirage, Calif., home yesterday, a day after collapsing onstage during a performance at the Mosque auditorium in Richmond, Va. He said it was "very, very good to be home" and his spokeswoman said he'll resume his tour in a few weeks. Sunday night, three hours after being rushed by ambulance to the Medical College of Virginia Hospitals, the entertainer strode out of the facility. "He decided he wanted to leave and he left," said a hospital spokesman.
LIVING
March 9, 1995 | By W. Speers This story contains information from the Associated Press, Reuters, New York Daily News, New York Post and New York Times
Friends of Frank Sinatra are cranking up a tribute to the unofficially retired performer at Manhattan's Carnegie Hall in late July. Signed up so far: Tony Bennett, Jack Jones, Vic Damone, Linda Ronstadt, Rosemary Clooney and Frank Sinatra Jr. The chairman's spokesman said the singer won't perform but is "delighted" about the tribute, which might take up three nights. Meanwhile, in a new book out next month, Shirley MacLaine writes lovingly and longingly about the toll that age has taken on her old Rat Pack pals, Sinatra and Dean Martin.
NEWS
October 28, 2011 | BY CHUCK DARROW, darrowc@phillynews.com215-313-3134
ATLANTIC CITY'S dire financial straits have made it a punching bag for those who believe the town's glory days are behind it. But don't count Frank Sinatra Jr. among them. "I think Atlantic City is coming back," insisted Sinatra, who plays Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa tonight and tomorrow. "It is Atlantic City that draws people to Atlantic City," he added, citing those things - the beach, ocean and Boardwalk - that the town's Pennsylvania-based competition can't, and never will, claim.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | By Louis R. Carlozo, Special to The Inquirer
A blond woman in a bright orange jumpsuit grabs your wrist, asking you to look straight into her powder-blue eyes while she confesses just how deeply her feelings run for Frank Sinatra: "He teaches life," she says. "It's like he was the teacher and I was the student. " Alice Frascella of Philadelphia is one of many worshipers. "He's Babe Ruth when it comes to music," said Marty McCrossen, 37, of South Philadelphia. "He's probably the best thing to happen to popular music.
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NEWS
March 20, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IF YOU WANTED to see a face light up with a happy smile, all you had to do was say the words "Lou Voci' to anyone who had known the man even slightly. Lou Voci was a single-copy supervisor for the Daily News and Inquirer for more than 30 years, a man known for his devotion to his job, his meticulous attention to detail and a friendly nature that endeared him to everyone he met. "Everybody loved Lou," said Bob Palmo, retired regional manager in the newspapers' circulation department and Lou's onetime boss.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Bob Dylan does it his way. Recording standards from the American Songbook has become as predictable a career move for everyone from Rod Stewart to Paul McCartney to Lady Gaga (with Tony Bennett) as cutting a Christmas album. But Dylan - who also released the perverse holiday album Christmas In The Heart in 2009 - does not trod the well-worn path. All 10 songs on his new album, Shadows In The Night (Columbia ***) are associated with Frank Sinatra, but it is not a collection of ring-a-ding swing.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
  H   ARRY STYLES may make One Direction fans swoon, but, according to Mike Walker , of the National Enquirer , Harry's set on portraying another singer who made women hyperventilate. Frank Sinatra . Seems Harry is a huge fan of Ol' Blue Eyes. "Harry's idolized Frank Sinatra for years!" said an anonymous source. "He endlessly practices his signature singing and his style . . . he's got Frank's swagger down to a tee! It's scary, 'cause when Harry looks at you with his dreamy light eyes, you'd swear he was channeling Ol' Blue Eyes himself!"
NEWS
December 31, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Faith Jerome, 76, of Cherry Hill, a longtime nurse and member of the township's school board, died Monday, Dec. 22, at home of pancreatic cancer. When a local school was slated to close in the early 1980s, a friend persuaded Mrs. Jerome to run for the Cherry Hill school board. Fifteen years later, when she decided against seeking a sixth term, former board member James Marino told The Inquirer that "she has great integrity. . . . I can't think of a decision she ever made that she didn't feel she was doing in the best interest of the children of Cherry Hill.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2014 | Chuck Darrow, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
WHEN FRANK SINATRA JR. made his introductory remarks at Friday night's Parx Casino bash honoring local radio titan Sid Mark 's 58th year spinning Ol' Blue Eyes' records, he obviously noted the day was an important one, as it would have been his father's 99th birthday. But Dec. 12 was doubly significant: He revealed that it had been two years to the day since he was diagnosed with Stage 4A throat cancer (the "A" meant it had metastasized). Sinatra, 71 next month, spent about a year undergoing grueling radiation and chemotherapy, and eating through a tube inserted in his stomach.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
JAPANESE NATIONALISTS are in a tizzy over Angelina Jolie 's new movie, "Unbroken," the story of U.S. Olympian and World War II POW Louis Zamperini . According to Zamperini's story and the book about him by Laura Hillenbrand , Zamperini wasn't treated too well by Japanese guards while he was being held captive. But protesters claim that the depiction is unfair and untrue, and the London Telegraph says that those criticizing the film are trying to have it banned from Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Talk about a ring-a-ding-dinging endorsement. Frank Sinatra - his recorded voice, that is - introduced Tony Bennett at the Borgata Event Center in Atlantic City on Friday. "Tony's going to come out now and he's going to tear the seats out of the place for you," said The Voice from beyond the grave. "He's my man, this cat. . . . He's the greatest singer in the world today, this man, Mr. Tony Bennett!" Sinatra's admiration stood Bennett in good stead while Ol' Blue Eyes was alive, and since the Chairman's death in 1998, the singer born Anthony Benedetto has had Great American Songbook elder-statesman status to himself.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The "a-ha moment" for Gabriel Tatarian came at a party when, light-headed, he passed out. When he regained consciousness, son Gabriel T. said, Dr. Tatarian determined to get himself into shape. After the episode, "he was a pretty avid runner, from age 50 to 88," his son said. "He was running five miles a day for 15 years, to 65. " And that was despite a demanding day job. On Monday, Nov. 17, Dr. Tatarian, 91, of Moorestown, from 1961 to 1988 the co-chief of obstetrics and gynecology at the Rancocas Valley division of the former Zurbrugg Memorial Hospital, died at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JOHN KING was an ambulance driver in the Army Medical Corps on Newfoundland during World War II when he got a life-changing assignment. A group of Army nurses had been hiking on Telegraph Hill in St. John's when one of them fell and twisted an ankle and needed transport to a hospital. Along came the handsome medic to save the day. Love blossomed even though Florence Bialaszewski was a lieutenant and John was a lowly private. And because of the disparity in rank, their marriage on Newfoundland was kept a secret from the brass.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
*  EVEN THIS I GET TO EXPERIENCE. By Norman Lear. Penguin Press. NORMAN LEAR'S led a big life, and at 92, he's ready to talk about it. The legendary producer and activist, whose 1970s taboo-busting comedy "All in the Family" was the first in a string of Lear-produced hits that included "Maude" and "Sanford and Son," has a new project, a memoir he's called Even This I Get to Experience. "It's the first time I've written thoroughly about myself. Although I have learned in the course of the years that I was writing about myself and putting it other characters," said Lear in a phone interview Tuesday.
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