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Frank Zappa

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NEWS
February 26, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services Columnists Karen Feld, Richard Hack, the Associated Press and the Entertainment Wire contributed to this article
Frank Zappa, the rock-star icon from the '60s, tonight begins a three-day stint as guest host of cable's Financial News Network. His forum: FNN's Focus series. But the topics won't be the state of rock, his 25 years of innovation and playful experiments in music, or any kind of music at all. They are, however, in the Zappa tradition: eclectic. Tonight's show looks at U.S. business opportunities in the Soviet Union. He taped segments during a January trip to Moscow, Paris and Czechoslovakia, where he met that country's new president, Vaclav Havel.
NEWS
November 8, 1991 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press, the Los Angeles Times and the New York Daily News contributed to this report
Rock musician Frank Zappa has prostate cancer, his children announced yesterday at a Los Angeles news conference. "He is fighting successfully," said his daughter, Moon Unit, flanked by her brothers, Dweezil and Ahmet. "There are occasional periods where he's not feeling as well. Unfortunately, this is one. " The trio left the conference without answering questions, but a family spokesman said Zappa, who turns 51 on Dec. 21, was "at home and at work. " Rumors were pervasive during the last several weeks that Zappa, who first achieved fame with his band, the Mothers of Invention, was ill. The issue was forced because Zappa was scheduled to host a Manhattan theatrical tribute to his work, Zappa's Universe, set to open last night and to run through Sunday.
LIVING
September 24, 1992 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story includes information from the Associated Press and the New York Daily News
Frank Zappa, revealed to be suffering from prostate cancer almost a year ago, abruptly canceled scheduled appearances this week in Germany and Austria and flew back to L.A. for treatment. His spokesman in Frankfurt said the rock icon "was feeling very bad," but yesterday Zappa countered: "I was in bad shape but I'm better now. I'm not in the hospital. I'm in my kitchen. " Zappa, 51, who played to full houses twice last week in Frankfurt, was due to play in Berlin and Vienna. He's been tight-lipped about his illness, refusing to discuss it or its treatment.
NEWS
November 24, 2002 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Bucks County Symphony Orchestra will not be taking life easy in its middle age. As it turns 50 this fall, the group has an energetic new conductor and a concert schedule that will stretch all of its musical muscle, from classical to jazz and maybe even one day to Frank Zappa. Gary Fagin is the maestro, hired after a two-year search, who will wield his baton over the 70-member ensemble, which is gearing up for its second concert of the season, a youth concert to be presented Dec. 8 at Central Bucks East High School.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1989 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Remember Jimi Hendrix? How about the Pink Floyd song "Careful With That Ax, Eugene"? Or Robert Fripp's "I Talk to the Wind," from King Crimson's In the Court of the Crimson King? And the country waltz "The Last Word in Lonesome Is Me"? The Doors' "People Are Strange"? Eugene Chadbourne wants to make you forget such cherished icons, or at least scramble your memory of them. Chadbourne, appearing Monday at the Khyber Pass Pub, is the pre-eminent gonzo guitarist, and as such, feels he can reconstruct these songs whichever way he chooses.
NEWS
December 26, 1993
Marian Anderson; Diva Arthur Ashe; Tennis great Dizzy Gillespie; Jazz pioneer Audrey Hepburn; Oscar winner Thurgood Marshall; Trailblazer Rudolf Nureyev; Titan of dance River Phoenix; Young actor Vincent Price; Master of macabre Raymond Burr; TV's Perry Mason Cesar Chavez; Union organizer Agnes de Mille; Choreographer Federico Fellini; Magician of film Helen Hayes; Veteran actress ...
NEWS
March 17, 2011
Owsley "Bear" Stanley, 76, a 1960s counterculture icon who worked with the psychedelic rock band the Grateful Dead and was a prolific LSD producer, died in a car crash in Australia, his family said Monday. Lyrics sung by the Grateful Dead, Jimi Hendrix, and Frank Zappa reference Mr. Stanley and his brushes with the law, underlining his influence. Mr. Stanley produced an estimated pound of pure LSD, or roughly five million "trips" of normal potency of the hallucinogenic drug, after enrolling in 1963 at the University of California at Berkeley and becoming involved in the drug scene that underpinned the hippie movement, according to the BookRags.com website.
NEWS
December 29, 2012
Ray Collins, a singer whose dispute with one guitarist led him to hire another, Frank Zappa, with whom he would go on to form the avant-garde rock group the Mothers of Invention, died Monday in Pomona, Calif. The death of Mr. Collins, who was in his mid-70s, followed his admission to Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center a week earlier for cardiac arrest, according to local news accounts. Mr. Collins entered the national spotlight with the Mothers of Invention, an outlet for Zappa's unique sense of humor and challenging, unorthodox compositions.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There have been plenty of inspirational Hollywood tales about teachers over the years - Mr. Holland's Opus; Goodbye, Mr. Chips; Dead Poets Society; To Sir, With Love. But not a one focuses on a character as indefatigably unpleasant as Rock School's Paul Green. Which isn't to say that Don Argott's documentary about the founder of Philadelphia's fast-franchising Paul Green School of Rock Music isn't enjoyable. It is, immensely. And it isn't to say that Green, an oversize personality who scowls, sneers and occasionally wields a threatening drumstick at his teenage and pre-teen charges, isn't an effective teacher.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1988 | By John Milward , Special to The Inquirer
It was 20 years ago today, give or take a couple of weeks, that the Electric Factory became Philadelphia's psychedelic showplace. The place no longer exists, but the resulting promotion company is celebrating the occasion with a marathon "20th Anniversary Dance Party Celebration" from 3 to 11 p.m. Sunday at the Spectrum. No dress requirements here, but tie-dye and bell bottoms seem in order for a bill featuring the Chambers Brothers, Dave Mason, Spirit, Iron Butterfly, and the Spencer Davis Group.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Since his death in 1993, there's been no diminished awe where Frank Zappa is concerned. An absurd, sarcastic humorist and a genre-jumping composer whose output included avant-garde classicism, psychedelia, progressive jazz, doo-wop, musique concrète, and heavy metal, the thing that made him most magical - from a purely instrumental standpoint - was his dexterous, adventurous guitar playing. Tense, dissonant riffs with shifting time signatures or speedy, clearly plucked, note-bending solos - either way, Zappa stung and swung.
NEWS
December 29, 2012
Ray Collins, a singer whose dispute with one guitarist led him to hire another, Frank Zappa, with whom he would go on to form the avant-garde rock group the Mothers of Invention, died Monday in Pomona, Calif. The death of Mr. Collins, who was in his mid-70s, followed his admission to Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center a week earlier for cardiac arrest, according to local news accounts. Mr. Collins entered the national spotlight with the Mothers of Invention, an outlet for Zappa's unique sense of humor and challenging, unorthodox compositions.
NEWS
January 1, 2012
Pop The Dreamer (Verve Forecast ***1/2) By all indications, this will be Etta James' last album - the 73-year-old R&B great is reported to be in the last stages of leukemia. If it is, then the singer of such immortals as "Tell Mama," "At Last," and "I'd Rather Go Blind" is going out on a high note. The Dreamer presents James' trademark blend of sophistication and sass. She can still display some grit, as she does on the jump-blues chestnut "Too Tired" and a groove-heavy reworking of Guns 'N Roses' "Welcome to the Jungle.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Before he became the legendary music promoter who helped shape the concert industry over a four-decade career, Larry Magid was a 12-year-old doo-wop fan in West Philly, infected with the music bug by a song called "Sh-Boom. " The 1954 hit by the African American rhythm-and-blues group the Chords "had this refrain, 'Sh-boom, Sh-boom,' " Magid, 68, recalls fondly as he sits in his gold-record-lined office at the Piazza at Schmidts in Northern Liberties. "It made no sense, but it was something so different, so new. And you felt a connection to the music.
NEWS
March 17, 2011
Owsley "Bear" Stanley, 76, a 1960s counterculture icon who worked with the psychedelic rock band the Grateful Dead and was a prolific LSD producer, died in a car crash in Australia, his family said Monday. Lyrics sung by the Grateful Dead, Jimi Hendrix, and Frank Zappa reference Mr. Stanley and his brushes with the law, underlining his influence. Mr. Stanley produced an estimated pound of pure LSD, or roughly five million "trips" of normal potency of the hallucinogenic drug, after enrolling in 1963 at the University of California at Berkeley and becoming involved in the drug scene that underpinned the hippie movement, according to the BookRags.com website.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2010 | By Howard Gensler
L INDSAY LOHAN 's comeback role as a woman famous for her throat may have been put on hold by her nose. The former teen star confirmed on her Twitter page Friday the TMZ.com story that she had failed a court-ordered drug and alcohol screening. If asked, she tweeted, she is ready to appear before the judge and face the consequences for her actions. Oh, she'll be asked. "Regrettably, I did in fact fail my most recent drug test," Lindsay tweeted. She also tweeted: "Substance abuse is a disease, which unfortunately doesn't go away over night.
SPORTS
October 20, 2009
THE SPECTRUM. OCTOBER 24. Pick a year, any year. On that date in 1972, the Moody Blues performed. In '74 it was Van Morrison. In '77, Frank Zappa took the stage. In '80, The Kinks and John Cougar Mellencamp rocked the place. And in '97, Motley Crue showed its wild side. Over the years, there were also games involving the Flyers, Sixers and Phantoms on that date. This Saturday, Oct. 24, 2009, fans can relive those memories - as well as any of the hundreds of events that happened on other dates - as the Spectrum opens its doors for "The Last Stroll.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2009 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
WE COULD HAVE sworn that Ted Haggard's 15 minutes were up. Unfortunately, the ex-evangelist still feels the need to proclaim to the world that he's a repentant straight man. But where to go when you've already blabbed about your bi-sex life to Oprah, Larry King and an HBO documentary, and your former flock still isn't flocking? The answer: "Divorce Court. " We really thought that this was a joke when copy editor Karin Berry informed us of the pastor's plans, but, alas.
NEWS
February 14, 2006
LOOK, DUDE, the School of Rock music is gonna live. Somewhere cause rock 'n' roll will never die! Oh, it may move to another site, BUT IT WILL NEVER DIE!!! (Pick up Stratocaster; blast rock riff here). We have an inkling that the Paul Green School of Rock, which must move out of its rental location at 1320 Race St. to make way for an expanded Pennsylvania Convention Center, will find a new home. It may not be as convenient as the Race Street location - the better to lure high school wannabe Hendrixes from Friends Select and Roman Catholic - but we hope it stays in Philly.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There have been plenty of inspirational Hollywood tales about teachers over the years - Mr. Holland's Opus; Goodbye, Mr. Chips; Dead Poets Society; To Sir, With Love. But not a one focuses on a character as indefatigably unpleasant as Rock School's Paul Green. Which isn't to say that Don Argott's documentary about the founder of Philadelphia's fast-franchising Paul Green School of Rock Music isn't enjoyable. It is, immensely. And it isn't to say that Green, an oversize personality who scowls, sneers and occasionally wields a threatening drumstick at his teenage and pre-teen charges, isn't an effective teacher.
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