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Frankenstein

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NEWS
September 16, 1992 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James J. Donahue, Jr., 54, Grays Ferry's favorite Frankenstein and a fun- loving truck driver who made the Penrose Diner his second home, died Monday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Mr. Donahue had driven a truck for M. Wilson & Son Trucking Co. in South Philadelphia for the last 10 years, and before that for Dennis Trucking Co. in Southwest Philadelphia. He had a reputation for keeping his trucks sparkling clean. Even in the early days, when he drove a coal truck, he was the one driver who managed to keep both himself and his truck clean, said his daughter, Karen Smith.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1988 | By LEWIS BEALE, Los Angeles Daily News
Maybe it was the gentle, cultured voice. Maybe it was the humanity and pathos he could inject into even the most monstrous of characters. Maybe it was the recognition that a top talent was giving his all in the service of B- movies. Whatever it was, Boris Karloff managed to engage the attention and sympathy of filmgoing generations. From the original "Frankenstein" to "Targets," "The Mummy" to "The Raven," Karloff practically defined the Hollywood horror movie. With his professionalism, gentility and sense of style, he managed to tower over the scores of films that were beneath his talents.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The great Gothic monsters of 19th-century literature elude convincing musical treatment, probably because these semi-folkloric creatures lose their bite and mystery when baring their souls in music. Wisely, the Philadelphia Opera Collective veered away from direct dramatization of the monster at hand in By You That Made Me, Frankenstein , characterizing the circumstances behind the famous Mary Shelley novel. Seen on Saturday in the thick of the current Fringe Festival, this 90-minute, two-act opera of sorts was presented in the second-floor parlor of the cozy 19th-century-ish Benjamin Franklin Club, in something close to a site-specific performance.
NEWS
July 30, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the era when Frankenstein's monster got smaller, James Warren had a radical idea. Movie monsters, gigantic and terrifying on the big screen in the dark, were now a foot high on living room televisions in the light of day. "Kids were in the safety of their own home," said Warren, 82, of Wyncote, "They weren't scared, and they started taking the side of the monster. " So Warren, then an ad man out of money after an arrest on pornography charges, came up with a plan. He would turn the Draculas and Hunchbacks into celebrities with a fan magazine all their own. With Famous Monsters of Filmland, first published in 1958, Warren began a career that would mark the beginning - and apex - of horror film publications.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Where is Boris Karloff when you really need him? Better question: Where is Mary Shelley's lawyer? Of all the atrocities that have been perpetrated on Mary Shelley's brilliant and iconic novel Frankenstein - ranging from the scary to the ridiculous to the hilarious - Neal Bell's Monster may take the abomination cake. Luna Theater's production of this wretched script, directed by Gregory Scott Campbell, is tedious (the longest 90 minutes imaginable) and so clumsy as to be nearly a parody.
NEWS
October 30, 2011
For Halloween weekend, match the horror-fiction author with his or her work. Answers: Below. 1. L.A. Banks. 2. Stephen King. 3. Ira Levin. 4. Susie Moloney. 5. Edgar Allan Poe. 6. Horacio Quiroga. 7. Anne Rice. 8. Mary Shelley. 9. Bram Stoker. 10. Koji Suzuki a. The Dark Tower, The Gunslinger . b. Dracula . c. A Dry Spell . d. Frankenstein . e. Interview With the Vampire . f. Ring . g. Rosemary's Baby . h. Stories of Love, Madness, and Death . i. Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque . j. The Vampire Huntress Legend series.
NEWS
July 26, 2011
There's another shadow group creeping around New Jersey politics with the frightening ability to raise untold millions from unknown donors, all aimed at influencing the state's business. Organized as an "issues advocacy" group under the federal tax code, this newest group, sponsored by Democrats, is called One New Jersey. The name is as vague as its stated mission: to attack politicians who are hurting New Jersey families. So far, the organization has a website and has issued press releases that attack Republican Gov. Christie.
NEWS
July 20, 1997 | By Jeff Gammage, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
All this town needed this weekend was an angry mob of German villagers to storm a darkened castle under the eerie glow of torchlight. It already had plenty of monsters. Vampires with blood-red lips and zombies with blue faces lurched into downtown from across the country, descending on the Ramada Inn to cheer classic horror movies, hover near the descendants of the genre's biggest stars, and generally howl at the moon. "I don't know if Ligonier is ready for this," said Ron Adams, a Pittsburgh radio-station programmer and "morgue-anizer" of the Monster Bash Convention.
NEWS
January 11, 1988 | BY MIKE ROYKO
If the idea of modern living theater is to involve the audience, Boris Karloff was years ahead of his time. When he came on the screen, with those electrodes jutting out of his neck, everybody in the audience did something. There were those who suddenly remembered they had to visit the washroom. Others, more honest, simply rolled over in the seat and crouched so that their back pockets pointed at the screen. As the suspense built, some kids slowly slid down the seat. At the moment of horror, they were out of sight, on the floor.
NEWS
February 19, 1990 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Written and directed by horror-meister Clive Barker (who adapted it from his novel Cabal), Night Breed aspires to slasher status but is too refined for it. No one, least of all Barker, knows whether the film's vaguely creepy creatures from a netherworld called Midian are murderous lepers or mild leprechauns. Night Breed's Midian, a sort of Druid theme park outside Toronto, is populated by inhabitants who caper like Kabuki monsters equipped with Steadicams. Then again, Midian just might be a recurring nightmare of Boone (Craig Sheffer)
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NEWS
May 5, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paranormal Activity is far more than a low-budget, spine-tingling horror film to Dawn Keetley, associate professor of English at Lehigh University. For her, it's a window into "the problems of selfhood. " Why, for instance, does the 2007 flick feature a photograph of the protagonist, Katie, and her boyfriend when the person in the photo is not Katie, the professor asks on her blog. Keetley explains: "The fact that this photograph of Katie is not of Katie heightens the fact that the film in general erodes the very idea that we have a distinct, stable, persistent 'self.' " There's good reason Keetley has become known to some on campus in Bethlehem as the Professor of Horror.
NEWS
March 4, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia police officer described the controlled chaos in the crowded aisle of a Feltonville grocery as he and two other officers tried to subdue a struggling suspect. For him, Edward Davies told a Philadelphia jury Monday, the struggle ended in a gunshot. "I just heard a bang, and when I stood up, I felt up in my chest it was getting real hot, and my stomach got real hot, and when I looked down, I saw a hole in my shirt," Davies said. Davies, 42, took the witness stand as the prosecution began the fourth day in the trial of Eric Torres on charges of attempted murder and aggravated assault in the 2013 incident.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The great Gothic monsters of 19th-century literature elude convincing musical treatment, probably because these semi-folkloric creatures lose their bite and mystery when baring their souls in music. Wisely, the Philadelphia Opera Collective veered away from direct dramatization of the monster at hand in By You That Made Me, Frankenstein , characterizing the circumstances behind the famous Mary Shelley novel. Seen on Saturday in the thick of the current Fringe Festival, this 90-minute, two-act opera of sorts was presented in the second-floor parlor of the cozy 19th-century-ish Benjamin Franklin Club, in something close to a site-specific performance.
NEWS
July 30, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the era when Frankenstein's monster got smaller, James Warren had a radical idea. Movie monsters, gigantic and terrifying on the big screen in the dark, were now a foot high on living room televisions in the light of day. "Kids were in the safety of their own home," said Warren, 82, of Wyncote, "They weren't scared, and they started taking the side of the monster. " So Warren, then an ad man out of money after an arrest on pornography charges, came up with a plan. He would turn the Draculas and Hunchbacks into celebrities with a fan magazine all their own. With Famous Monsters of Filmland, first published in 1958, Warren began a career that would mark the beginning - and apex - of horror film publications.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Iconic silent era photographs . . .. Directors' favorite forgotten films. . . . Essential science fiction . . .. A critic chimes in. We've got books, movie books. Herewith, a roundup of some recent cinema-centric tomes: Still: American Silent Motion Picture Photography (University of Chicago Press, $50). David S. Shields' appropriately photo-packed history of the nascent days of movie publicity - the first photographers to capture silent screen stars on set, on the backlot, in candid settings and staged studio portraits - offers far more than just an amazing collection of images.
NEWS
March 18, 2012 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
What's the difference between accepting yourself and giving up? I'm talking of course, about going gray. Because that's what's happening. I've had glimmers of gray hair before, but it was concentrated on the right and left sides of my head, which gave me a nice Bride of Frankenstein look. But I've been working so hard over the winter that I haven't bothered to get my hair highlighted, and today I noticed that there's a lot more gray than there used to be. And you know what?
NEWS
November 28, 2011 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Drawn to the outrageous and outlandish like a giant freaky moth to a flame, Ken Russell, the English filmmaker, was best known for his stormy adaptation of D.H. Lawrence's Women in Love , and for turning a Franz Liszt biopic into an over-the-top rock opera with robot Nazis, and for the religio-sexual brouhaha of his 17th-century witchcraft drama The Devils . He died in his sleep Sunday in London. Mr. Russell was 84; he recently had suffered a series of strokes, but had been planning any number of new projects.
NEWS
October 30, 2011
For Halloween weekend, match the horror-fiction author with his or her work. Answers: Below. 1. L.A. Banks. 2. Stephen King. 3. Ira Levin. 4. Susie Moloney. 5. Edgar Allan Poe. 6. Horacio Quiroga. 7. Anne Rice. 8. Mary Shelley. 9. Bram Stoker. 10. Koji Suzuki a. The Dark Tower, The Gunslinger . b. Dracula . c. A Dry Spell . d. Frankenstein . e. Interview With the Vampire . f. Ring . g. Rosemary's Baby . h. Stories of Love, Madness, and Death . i. Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque . j. The Vampire Huntress Legend series.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2011
Repertory Films Academy of Natural Sciences 1900 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.; 215-299-1000. www.ansp.org . Mega-Bad Movie Night: Eight Legged Freaks. $15; $10 members. 10/27. 7-10 pm. Ambler Theater 108 E. Butler Ave., Ambler; 215-345-7855. www.amblertheater.com . 28 Days Later (2002) $9.75; $7.25 seniors, students with ID and under 18. 10/25. 7:30 pm. Bryn Mawr Film Institute 824 W. Lancaster Ave., Bryn Mawr; 610-527-9898. www.brynmawrfilm.org . Labyrinth (1986)
NEWS
July 26, 2011
There's another shadow group creeping around New Jersey politics with the frightening ability to raise untold millions from unknown donors, all aimed at influencing the state's business. Organized as an "issues advocacy" group under the federal tax code, this newest group, sponsored by Democrats, is called One New Jersey. The name is as vague as its stated mission: to attack politicians who are hurting New Jersey families. So far, the organization has a website and has issued press releases that attack Republican Gov. Christie.
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