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Frankford Yellow Jackets

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NEWS
February 1, 1986
One of the most interesting aspects of a visit to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio, is browsing through the section devoted to the game's early history. There is a considerable amount of information on some of the old teams including, not surprisingly, the Bulldogs from Canton and the Tigers from nearby Massillon. But the historical section ought to be much more informative in regard to pioneering teams such as the Frankford Yellow Jackets. The Yellow Jackets, founded in 1899 by the Frankford Athletic Association, joined the National Football League in 1924 and won the league championship in 1926.
NEWS
July 19, 2001
GATHER 'ROUND, kids, and let me tell you a story about what used to be called professional football. Once upon a time, a team called the Frankford Yellow Jackets became the Philadelphia Eagles. I'd go to the games with your great-great-grandfather and great-grandfather. We had season tickets for 30 years. But the owners got greedy. They kept raising the ticket price until the average parents couldn't afford to take their kids to the games. Paying obscene salaries, they put more and more mediocre players on the field.
SPORTS
January 3, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Francis "Hap" Moran, a former All-Pro who began his pro football career with the NFL champion Frankford Yellow Jackets in 1926, has died at the age of 93. Moran, who was believed to be the second-oldest living NFL veteran, died last Friday at a nursing home where he had spent the past four years. Moran, who was born and raised in Iowa, was a starting running back and placekicker for Frankford in its only championship season. Moran began the following season with the Yellow Jackets but later moved to the Chicago Cardinals, where he played with Jim Thorpe.
SPORTS
March 18, 2003 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell launched a statewide drive yesterday to reclaim the 1925 NFL title for the Pottsville Maroons. Rendell began recruiting city councils, including Philadelphia's, to ask the NFL to turn over the title to the long-defunct pro team in time for Pottsville's bicentennial in 2006. Undisputed, both in Pottsville lore and NFL history books, is that the Maroons beat the Chicago Cardinals in a matchup between the league's two top teams of 1925. Wanting to further prove their football might, the Maroons then challenged - and defeated - a team of all-star Notre Dame players on the Philadelphia home turf of the Frankford Yellow Jackets.
SPORTS
October 25, 2000 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
All of a sudden, John Stockton is fascinated with the idea of going out to Frankford Avenue and Devereaux Street in Northeast Philadelphia. Even if the converted horse track where the old Frankford Yellow Jackets played in the NFL is no longer there. Even if a car dealership stands on the ground where his grandfather, Houston "Bud" Stockton, helped win a championship in 1926. It took until the eve of John Stockton's 17th season with the Utah Jazz to realize he had a connection to Philadelphia, a link to his family's history.
SPORTS
November 20, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 59-point explosion that Michael Vick ignited against the Washington Redskins on Monday night was so eye-popping that it was surprising to learn another Eagles team once had done better. The 1934 Eagles scored 64 points in what remains the biggest regular-season blowout in NFL history, a lopsided shutout of the Cincinnati Reds. But don't be too impressed. That 10-touchdown romp came against a doomed and dispirited opponent, one whose surrender was so blatant that its defenders, according to Inquirer sportswriter Stan Baumgartner, played as if the Eagles "had recently contracted smallpox.
SPORTS
August 29, 1991 | by Ray Didinger, Daily News Sports Writer
There's a team in Frankford here, A team that can't be beat. For them, we surely hold no fear That they'll ever taste defeat. - Frankford Yellow Jackets fight song Once upon a time, the best team in professional football played on a converted horse track in Northeast Philadelphia. The Frankford Yellow Jackets, that was their name, and in 1926 they defeated every team from the Chicago Bears to the Providence Steam Roller en route to the National Football League championship.
SPORTS
September 20, 2005 | By Michael D. Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
About the only things missing are tailgating recipes. Other than that, The Eagles Encyclopedia (Temple University Press, $35) is as thorough as an Andy Reid game plan. The 324-page "Eaglepedia," which the publisher describes as the first comprehensive history of the team, has everything a Bird-watcher could want to know - and maybe even a little more - from pro football's local beginnings as a stepchild of the Phillies and the Athletics to the Eagles' Super Bowl loss to the New England Patriots.
NEWS
May 5, 1995 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Howard Barnes looks back now and laughs. Laughs so hard he cries. One that really gets him is the one about Beanie Gibson. Beanie worked in a neighborhood bar sweeping sawdust off the floor. After apparently mixing a little too much pleasure with business, Beanie walked into the butcher shop across the street, bought 10 cents worth of sauerkraut and, instead of getting a bag, instructed the butcher to dump the sauerkraut, juice and all, "right there" . . . in his coat pocket. "You could smell that juice on Beanie for two weeks," laughed Barnes.
NEWS
December 21, 2000 | by William C. Kashatus
Having been raised in Northeast Philly, where football is a way of life, I can truly appreciate the wild ride local gridiron fans are taking this season. Our hometown Iggles (Phillyspeak for "Eagles") have shocked the hell out of us by going 10-5. Who would've figured they'd be playoff material? In fact, the Iggles' turnaround from the depths of the Ray Rhodes era has been so complete that it raises the question, "Yo, Jeff! Wanna buy the Phillies?" Such a magical season brings to mind those thrillin' days of yesteryear when another Philly team ruled the NFL. It was a time when pigskin heroes lived in the same neighborhoods as their fans and played for little more than $200 each week and the sheer love of "da game.
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SPORTS
November 20, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 59-point explosion that Michael Vick ignited against the Washington Redskins on Monday night was so eye-popping that it was surprising to learn another Eagles team once had done better. The 1934 Eagles scored 64 points in what remains the biggest regular-season blowout in NFL history, a lopsided shutout of the Cincinnati Reds. But don't be too impressed. That 10-touchdown romp came against a doomed and dispirited opponent, one whose surrender was so blatant that its defenders, according to Inquirer sportswriter Stan Baumgartner, played as if the Eagles "had recently contracted smallpox.
SPORTS
September 20, 2005 | By Michael D. Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
About the only things missing are tailgating recipes. Other than that, The Eagles Encyclopedia (Temple University Press, $35) is as thorough as an Andy Reid game plan. The 324-page "Eaglepedia," which the publisher describes as the first comprehensive history of the team, has everything a Bird-watcher could want to know - and maybe even a little more - from pro football's local beginnings as a stepchild of the Phillies and the Athletics to the Eagles' Super Bowl loss to the New England Patriots.
SPORTS
March 18, 2003 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell launched a statewide drive yesterday to reclaim the 1925 NFL title for the Pottsville Maroons. Rendell began recruiting city councils, including Philadelphia's, to ask the NFL to turn over the title to the long-defunct pro team in time for Pottsville's bicentennial in 2006. Undisputed, both in Pottsville lore and NFL history books, is that the Maroons beat the Chicago Cardinals in a matchup between the league's two top teams of 1925. Wanting to further prove their football might, the Maroons then challenged - and defeated - a team of all-star Notre Dame players on the Philadelphia home turf of the Frankford Yellow Jackets.
NEWS
July 19, 2001
GATHER 'ROUND, kids, and let me tell you a story about what used to be called professional football. Once upon a time, a team called the Frankford Yellow Jackets became the Philadelphia Eagles. I'd go to the games with your great-great-grandfather and great-grandfather. We had season tickets for 30 years. But the owners got greedy. They kept raising the ticket price until the average parents couldn't afford to take their kids to the games. Paying obscene salaries, they put more and more mediocre players on the field.
NEWS
December 21, 2000 | by William C. Kashatus
Having been raised in Northeast Philly, where football is a way of life, I can truly appreciate the wild ride local gridiron fans are taking this season. Our hometown Iggles (Phillyspeak for "Eagles") have shocked the hell out of us by going 10-5. Who would've figured they'd be playoff material? In fact, the Iggles' turnaround from the depths of the Ray Rhodes era has been so complete that it raises the question, "Yo, Jeff! Wanna buy the Phillies?" Such a magical season brings to mind those thrillin' days of yesteryear when another Philly team ruled the NFL. It was a time when pigskin heroes lived in the same neighborhoods as their fans and played for little more than $200 each week and the sheer love of "da game.
SPORTS
October 25, 2000 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
All of a sudden, John Stockton is fascinated with the idea of going out to Frankford Avenue and Devereaux Street in Northeast Philadelphia. Even if the converted horse track where the old Frankford Yellow Jackets played in the NFL is no longer there. Even if a car dealership stands on the ground where his grandfather, Houston "Bud" Stockton, helped win a championship in 1926. It took until the eve of John Stockton's 17th season with the Utah Jazz to realize he had a connection to Philadelphia, a link to his family's history.
NEWS
February 22, 2000 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Frank A. "Scotti" Scaricaciottoli, a family man and sportsman, died of pneumonia Friday. He was 79 and lived in South Philadelphia. Scotti worked at the Frankford Arsenal for 30 years as a gauge inspector, retiring in 1974. He then worked for First Pennsylvania Bank for 15 years as a foot courier. "He was the most beautiful person you'd ever want to know," said his wife of 50 years, the former Theresa Ferra. They met at the old Jimmy Dykes Bowling Alley, on Market Street.
SPORTS
December 31, 1999 | By Gary Miles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Long before Jaws, the Dutchman or even Concrete Charlie, there were Dinger Doane and Arda Bowser. Never heard of them? Join the club, and unless you dig through the roster of the 1921 Frankford Yellow Jackets, it's unlikely you ever will. But in looking back over 100 years of professional football in Philadelphia, Doane and Bowser have a place, too. After all, how would the Yellow Jackets have managed that scintillating 0-0 tie with the Philadelphia Quakers in the 1921 "city championship" game without the two running backs?
NEWS
May 5, 1995 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Howard Barnes looks back now and laughs. Laughs so hard he cries. One that really gets him is the one about Beanie Gibson. Beanie worked in a neighborhood bar sweeping sawdust off the floor. After apparently mixing a little too much pleasure with business, Beanie walked into the butcher shop across the street, bought 10 cents worth of sauerkraut and, instead of getting a bag, instructed the butcher to dump the sauerkraut, juice and all, "right there" . . . in his coat pocket. "You could smell that juice on Beanie for two weeks," laughed Barnes.
SPORTS
January 3, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Francis "Hap" Moran, a former All-Pro who began his pro football career with the NFL champion Frankford Yellow Jackets in 1926, has died at the age of 93. Moran, who was believed to be the second-oldest living NFL veteran, died last Friday at a nursing home where he had spent the past four years. Moran, who was born and raised in Iowa, was a starting running back and placekicker for Frankford in its only championship season. Moran began the following season with the Yellow Jackets but later moved to the Chicago Cardinals, where he played with Jim Thorpe.
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