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Franklin Delano Roosevelt

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NEWS
April 30, 1997
We raise monuments to honor a leader and his or her legacy. One of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's most impressive achievements - his rise to political greatness despite paralysis from polio - should be acknowledged by adding an image of him in a wheelchair to his memorial. It belongs with the other, familiar image he so carefully designed, the president wearing a dashing cape with his little dog, Fala, close by. A statue of the wheelchair-bound FDR need not dominate the memorial; it should be a modest addition, not the most prominent feature.
NEWS
April 15, 1995
On the 50th anniversary of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's death, only a few people are still around who remember the shock and terror that swept through the land on April 12, 1945. FDR had been president so long, a calming father figure through Depression and war, that many Americans couldn't imagine a United States without him. Young adults didn't even remember another president. The war wasn't over yet, and Americans were apprehensive that without their longtime leader, we might falter.
NEWS
December 26, 1987 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
Chris Elliott's F.D.R. - A One-Man Show, the latest in Cinemax's Comedy Experiment series (tonight at 11:30), bypasses the concept of "funny" very early on and goes probing for something more unusual. Elliott is the staff writer for Late Night With David Letterman who has made a second - or perhaps, nowadays, first - career out of portraying odd characters like The Man Under the Seats and an exaggeration of Marlon Brando as a demented hermit. In all his comic incarnations, Elliott gives his characters an angry, aggressive edge - the last thing he's interested in is being likable.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992 "H
YDE PARK ON Hudson" features former pot-smoking greenskeeper and ghostbuster Bill Murray as FDR, our Nazi-busting, Depression-ending president. A comedian like Bill Murray as Franklin Delano Roosevelt? You might as well cast Robin Williams as Theodore Roosevelt. Oh wait. Robin Williams was Theodore Roosevelt. And he was pretty good too, albeit in the children's fantasy "Night at the Museum. " "Hyde Park" asks a little more of Murray, casting him as FDR on the eve of World War II, meeting in upstate New York with England's King George, cementing the special relationship that in the coming years would liberate Europe and defeat Adolph Hitler.
NEWS
October 14, 1994 | By Mary Otto and James R. Carroll, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
He said he wanted a memorial no bigger than a desk, and for a long time that's all there has been: a marble block plunked down on a grass strip on Pennsylvania Avenue. But soon, Franklin Delano Roosevelt will get a $52 million memorial near those commemorating Washington, Jefferson and Lincoln. Yesterday, nearly 50 years after his death, construction finally began here on a memorial to the President who led the nation longer than any other, and in times of unparalleled troubles.
NEWS
April 17, 1995
It was not simply the New Deal and other pillars of the mighty Roosevelt legacy that got a going over last week, 50 years after the death of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. It was also the broader, more vexing question - a fine one as pipsqueaks unabashedly join the race for the White House - of how to take the measure of the man, leg braces and all. At the Warm Springs, Ga., ceremonies that commemorated the indelible imprint FDR left on his generation - helping it endure the Great Depression, giving it heart as the nation fought the most fateful war of the century - it was his generosity of spirit that was most celebrated.
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Tim McGrath
Hey, fellow voter! Are you already tired of this presidential campaign? The frustration in finding a statesman among the candidates? The buzz-saw drone of TV talking (and shouting) heads? Wave after wave of attack ads? Don't you wish that we could find a better approach? Here's one suggestion: Why not put our technological advances to good use, and let both parties run the same candidates each election? Representing the Democrats, Franklin Delano Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy.
NEWS
July 30, 1986 | By Tom Fox, Inquirer Editorial Board
The big 4th of July celebration in New York harbor, dedicating the refurbished Statue of Liberty, earlier this month was a sentimental time for Commonwealth Court President Judge Jim Crumlish. He was piped aboard the USS Iowa, his wartime billet and the flagship of Secretary of the Navy John F. Lehman during the celebration, and when His Honor pranced the fine old teakwood decks his memory was jogged by the old battleship's hallowed past. It all began last April at a La Salle High alumni reception honoring John F. Lehman, a La Salle High alum.
NEWS
November 27, 1999
Jesse in Decatur Jesse Jackson must ask himself: "What can I do to get my name in the paper today?" He's in Decatur, Ill., protesting that the schools' zero-tolerance policy shouldn't apply to students who are black. If he's successful, it will send a signal that it's all right to start mob fights at games. People like Jesse are the first to say we must stop the violence and save our schools, etc. If this extortive tactic is successful, these six students can go on to become the gangs he admitted fearing when they were behind him a few years back.
NEWS
November 20, 1995 | By Leroy Aarons
I read news reports about the Republicans' big $254 billion budget- balancing act at the expense of the less privileged, and suddenly I feel my age. As a child of the Depression, I grew up believing that America's destiny was safe in the hands of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. To our family FDR was as close to a deity available in mortal flesh. He was responsible for protecting my dad, a postal worker, and all Americans against poverty by putting in place a massive safety net comprised of Social Security, unemployment insurance, public works and the rest.
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NEWS
December 14, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992 "H
YDE PARK ON Hudson" features former pot-smoking greenskeeper and ghostbuster Bill Murray as FDR, our Nazi-busting, Depression-ending president. A comedian like Bill Murray as Franklin Delano Roosevelt? You might as well cast Robin Williams as Theodore Roosevelt. Oh wait. Robin Williams was Theodore Roosevelt. And he was pretty good too, albeit in the children's fantasy "Night at the Museum. " "Hyde Park" asks a little more of Murray, casting him as FDR on the eve of World War II, meeting in upstate New York with England's King George, cementing the special relationship that in the coming years would liberate Europe and defeat Adolph Hitler.
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Tim McGrath
Hey, fellow voter! Are you already tired of this presidential campaign? The frustration in finding a statesman among the candidates? The buzz-saw drone of TV talking (and shouting) heads? Wave after wave of attack ads? Don't you wish that we could find a better approach? Here's one suggestion: Why not put our technological advances to good use, and let both parties run the same candidates each election? Representing the Democrats, Franklin Delano Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy.
NEWS
November 20, 2011
A Modern History By Michael Hiltzik Free Press. 497 pp. $30 Reviewed by Leonard Boasberg Campaigning in Pittsburgh in 1932, Democratic presidential candidate Franklin Delano Roosevelt attacked the profligacy of President Herbert Hoover's four years of deficit spending and pledged to "reduce the cost of current federal government operations by 25 percent. " Four years later, preparing to return to Pittsburgh in his campaign for reelection, Roosevelt asked his speech writer, Sam Rosenman, to work up "a good and convincing explanation" for the earlier speech.
NEWS
November 27, 1999
Jesse in Decatur Jesse Jackson must ask himself: "What can I do to get my name in the paper today?" He's in Decatur, Ill., protesting that the schools' zero-tolerance policy shouldn't apply to students who are black. If he's successful, it will send a signal that it's all right to start mob fights at games. People like Jesse are the first to say we must stop the violence and save our schools, etc. If this extortive tactic is successful, these six students can go on to become the gangs he admitted fearing when they were behind him a few years back.
NEWS
April 30, 1997
We raise monuments to honor a leader and his or her legacy. One of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's most impressive achievements - his rise to political greatness despite paralysis from polio - should be acknowledged by adding an image of him in a wheelchair to his memorial. It belongs with the other, familiar image he so carefully designed, the president wearing a dashing cape with his little dog, Fala, close by. A statue of the wheelchair-bound FDR need not dominate the memorial; it should be a modest addition, not the most prominent feature.
NEWS
March 24, 1996 | By Angie Cannon, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
George Bush got a sterling silver broccoli pin. Ronald Reagan got a ceramic magnet of himself holding jelly beans. Bill Clinton got a big Razorback hog of sheet metal. Bestowing gifts on presidents is an age-old practice. There are canes and clocks. Boots and belt buckles. Rugs and rocking chairs. Gifts from heads of state are an elaborate diplomatic ritual - a marble-and-gold candelabra from Charles de Gaulle to Dwight Eisenhower, an emerald-and-ruby tiara from a Moroccan sultan for down-to-earth Eleanor Roosevelt.
NEWS
November 20, 1995 | By Leroy Aarons
I read news reports about the Republicans' big $254 billion budget- balancing act at the expense of the less privileged, and suddenly I feel my age. As a child of the Depression, I grew up believing that America's destiny was safe in the hands of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. To our family FDR was as close to a deity available in mortal flesh. He was responsible for protecting my dad, a postal worker, and all Americans against poverty by putting in place a massive safety net comprised of Social Security, unemployment insurance, public works and the rest.
NEWS
April 17, 1995
It was not simply the New Deal and other pillars of the mighty Roosevelt legacy that got a going over last week, 50 years after the death of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. It was also the broader, more vexing question - a fine one as pipsqueaks unabashedly join the race for the White House - of how to take the measure of the man, leg braces and all. At the Warm Springs, Ga., ceremonies that commemorated the indelible imprint FDR left on his generation - helping it endure the Great Depression, giving it heart as the nation fought the most fateful war of the century - it was his generosity of spirit that was most celebrated.
NEWS
April 15, 1995
On the 50th anniversary of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's death, only a few people are still around who remember the shock and terror that swept through the land on April 12, 1945. FDR had been president so long, a calming father figure through Depression and war, that many Americans couldn't imagine a United States without him. Young adults didn't even remember another president. The war wasn't over yet, and Americans were apprehensive that without their longtime leader, we might falter.
NEWS
October 14, 1994 | By Mary Otto and James R. Carroll, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
He said he wanted a memorial no bigger than a desk, and for a long time that's all there has been: a marble block plunked down on a grass strip on Pennsylvania Avenue. But soon, Franklin Delano Roosevelt will get a $52 million memorial near those commemorating Washington, Jefferson and Lincoln. Yesterday, nearly 50 years after his death, construction finally began here on a memorial to the President who led the nation longer than any other, and in times of unparalleled troubles.
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