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NEWS
August 18, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / AMY HUNTOON
The Franklin Institute's latest program is all wet - a series on several aspects of water that shows everything from how waves are created to how the Fire Department uses water. The "Make Waves" series that runs through Sunday also has workshops on the ocean, boating safety and the city's water supply. Participants may take home mini wave-makers, paper ships, and weather detectors.
NEWS
September 24, 1986
As president of the Franklin Institute, Joel N. Bloom has a perfect right, even an obligation, to defend in print that organization's decision to deaccession its historical library holdings (Op-ed Page, Sept. 15). The terms in which he has chosen to do so, however, are appalling - even shocking - and raise questions far broader than the issue at hand. One does not expect the president of a museum to respond to criticism by heaping abuse upon his opponents. The assertion that those opposed to the random dispersal of those historical books are merely nostalgic for their childhoods is absurd.
NEWS
September 15, 1986 | By Joel N. Bloom
As a museum director, I often find myself chatting with visitors. Occasionally, one will say something like, "I enjoy the exhibit on electronics, but I sorely miss the old Nickelodeon Theater. " I try to explain that it's human to want the world to remain as it was when one was a child, but that the Nickelodeon Theater occupied the same space electronics does now and that even the Franklin Institute hasn't figured out how to have two objects occupy the same space. Or to borrow a cardinal principle from science, "Change is the fundamental law of nature and that organisms (and organizations)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1994 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Franklin Institute and QVC yesterday officially announced an agreement that will put the Philadelphia science museum's gift shop at the other end of 60 million remote controls. With a two-hour pilot show to air June 26 - in a lucrative Sunday-morning time slot aimed at children - the two will test the waters for a regularly scheduled show that would hawk science-related toys, games and books on the international shop-at-home channel. The Franklin Institute's Joseph D. Moore - who will become interim president on July 1 - declined to disclose financial details of the deal.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Few ancient sites stimulate the imagination as vividly as Pompeii. The Great Pyramids of Giza have passed down to us void of life - save for the souls buried there. But Pompeii was teeming with activity, with the lives of men, women, and children when it was buried - and preserved - under ash and pumice after Mount Vesuvius erupted on Aug. 24 in A.D. 79. The Franklin Institute pays homage to Pompeii's vibrant life with One Day in Pompeii , an exhibition of 150 artifacts from the famous Italian city now through April 24. Produced by Premier Exhibitions, Inc., the exhibition will have its world premiere at the Franklin before touring the rest of the country.
NEWS
January 1, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jane Grinspan, 66, of Merion, a writer, cook, and longtime publications director for the Franklin Institute, died Sunday, Dec. 30, of breast cancer, at her home. Mrs. Grinspan was a 50-year resident of the Philadelphia area. Her family said she was a renaissance woman with wide-ranging talents. In 1971, she was hired at the Franklin Institute, where she spent 39 years as a writer and editor before retiring in 2010. She relished the city's food and arts scene, and parlayed her knowledge into restaurant reviews that appeared in the Bulletin in the early 1970s.
NEWS
May 3, 1990 | By Cynthia Burton, Daily News Staff Writer
If anything at the Franklin Institute's new Futures Center was going to break, it was going to break yesterday, as 1,000 kids from 13 schools descended on the $71 million exhibition hall. "They will be here all night fixing whatever breaks," said Jennifer Donnelly, of the institute's public relations department. The museum, at 21st Street and the Parkway, was closed to the public yesterday and will open tomorrow. The Futures Center is a 90,000-square-foot exhibition hall that contains eight new permanent exhibits that aim to show visitors what life in the 21st century will be like.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 28, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
The most gut-clenching, psyche-rattling moment of Margee Kerr's 36 years on this planet came when she was 116 stories in the air above it, strapped into a harness so she could lean out from the top of Toronto's CN Tower. For Kerr, it was partly an academic experience. She studies fear for a living, and will speak about her work Wednesday night at the Franklin Institute, as part of Philadelphia's annual nine-day science festival. Thus far, attendees have been gazing at stars, digging up fossils, exploring colonial-era medicine, and solving murder mysteries.
NEWS
April 23, 2016
By Larry Dubinski Until the Kepler space telescope was launched in 2009, planets beyond our solar system seemed to be few and far between. But since then, Kepler has disproved that belief in spectacular fashion, confirming over a thousand new worlds orbiting other stars in our galaxy - some of which may even be Earth-like planets harboring life. Much like Apollo 8's famous "Earth rise" photograph, showing a lonely, blue Earth rising above the stark lunar landscape, the Kepler instrument has profoundly changed our perspective of humanity's place in the universe.
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
The field of medicine has tried all manner of techniques to ensure that patients take their daily pills, from issuing gentle reminders to checking whether prescriptions have been refilled. Robert S. Langer wants to tackle the problem with technology: loading a computer chip with medicine and embedding it in the patient's body. Science fiction? Try fact. The concept already has been successfully tested in people with osteoporosis, with implanted circuitry that delivers daily drug doses for weeks on end, and now the Gates Foundation is funding the study of such chips to administer birth control drugs to women in developing countries.
NEWS
April 16, 2016
ISSUE | DIGITAL SIGNS Assault on the senses Digital signs are jarringly out of place next to Philadelphia's classic architecture and are distracting to motorists and pedestrians ("Franklin Institute sign a lightning rod," Philly.com, April 7). When I drive west on Spruce Street, the super-bright digital sign on the Kimmel Center assaults my eyes. At least dial down the brightness. The same goes for the billboards on I-95 - they'll still be awful, but I'll be able to focus on the road.
NEWS
April 8, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, STAFF WRITER
IF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN came back to visit the science museum that bears his name, he'd find that a new digital sign along his Ben Franklin Parkway has become something of a lightning rod. After nearly four years of zoning and court battles, the Franklin Institute is expected - in a matter of weeks - to convert its traditional sign, at 20th Street and the parkway, into a digital sign that changes its message every 20 seconds. But if critics have their way, it won't happen. A flurry of emails between L&I Commissioner David Perri and longtime billboard critic Mary C. Tracy suggest that some city officials were exploring ways to stop the sign from going digital.
NEWS
April 4, 2016
BUCKS | CHESCO | DELCO | MONTCO | PHILADELPHIA
NEWS
April 4, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
James West, a bona fide rock star of science and technology, explained to the rapt group of young students assembled around his table that African drum communication was a model for the cellphone. Just as voices are transmitted from tower to tower before they reach their destinations, drum messages traveled from drummer to drummer, said West, 85, a professor of engineering at Johns Hopkins University. Rafi Mills, 12, was impressed. "I didn't know in Africa they had drum telephones," said Mills, an eighth grader at Masterman, a magnet school in Center City.
FOOD
April 1, 2016
The notion of a pizza topped with Mexican ingredients is not new to Philadelphia, where pizzerias like Rosario's on Wharton Street have been topping pies with everything from chicken tinga to mole for several years. But few cooks are quite as well-prepared to deliver Mex-Italian fusion as Justino Jimenez, the Puebla-born chef who cooked for several years at Vetri, Osteria, and Amis. When Jimenez sold his Oregon Avenue taqueria in September and moved uptown to buy Logan Square Pizza (now Pizza & Cocina)
BUSINESS
March 17, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
Ben Franklin Parkway and I-676 bridge construction has forced the Philadelphia Science Festival to move its signature Science Carnival to the Delaware waterfront. And nobody knows whether the festival's longtime lead sponsor, Dow Chemical, will still be so generous if its merger with DuPont goes through. Still, all parties were beaming in the noonday sun Tuesday at the Great Plaza at Penn's Landing - scene of this year's festival-capping Science Carnival - affirming that this celebration of all things STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math)
NEWS
March 14, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
Mikey Krause had waited practically his whole life for this. The 3-year-old can recite every line spoken by Toy Story character Woody and he reenacts the movie with his toys. Now, wearing a yellow Woody T-shirt and a brown fabric holster on one hip, he stood awestruck, face-to-face with a Buzz Lightyear, several times taller than him at a Franklin Institute exhibit. But he couldn't stand still for long. "Come on!" he yelled, running between Buzz and the characters Mike and Sulley from Monsters Inc. His aunt, Jen Krause, 22, tried to keep up, pushing his stroller and carrying his cowboy hat and plush Woody doll.
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