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NEWS
August 18, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / AMY HUNTOON
The Franklin Institute's latest program is all wet - a series on several aspects of water that shows everything from how waves are created to how the Fire Department uses water. The "Make Waves" series that runs through Sunday also has workshops on the ocean, boating safety and the city's water supply. Participants may take home mini wave-makers, paper ships, and weather detectors.
NEWS
September 24, 1986
As president of the Franklin Institute, Joel N. Bloom has a perfect right, even an obligation, to defend in print that organization's decision to deaccession its historical library holdings (Op-ed Page, Sept. 15). The terms in which he has chosen to do so, however, are appalling - even shocking - and raise questions far broader than the issue at hand. One does not expect the president of a museum to respond to criticism by heaping abuse upon his opponents. The assertion that those opposed to the random dispersal of those historical books are merely nostalgic for their childhoods is absurd.
NEWS
September 15, 1986 | By Joel N. Bloom
As a museum director, I often find myself chatting with visitors. Occasionally, one will say something like, "I enjoy the exhibit on electronics, but I sorely miss the old Nickelodeon Theater. " I try to explain that it's human to want the world to remain as it was when one was a child, but that the Nickelodeon Theater occupied the same space electronics does now and that even the Franklin Institute hasn't figured out how to have two objects occupy the same space. Or to borrow a cardinal principle from science, "Change is the fundamental law of nature and that organisms (and organizations)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1994 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Franklin Institute and QVC yesterday officially announced an agreement that will put the Philadelphia science museum's gift shop at the other end of 60 million remote controls. With a two-hour pilot show to air June 26 - in a lucrative Sunday-morning time slot aimed at children - the two will test the waters for a regularly scheduled show that would hawk science-related toys, games and books on the international shop-at-home channel. The Franklin Institute's Joseph D. Moore - who will become interim president on July 1 - declined to disclose financial details of the deal.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Few ancient sites stimulate the imagination as vividly as Pompeii. The Great Pyramids of Giza have passed down to us void of life - save for the souls buried there. But Pompeii was teeming with activity, with the lives of men, women, and children when it was buried - and preserved - under ash and pumice after Mount Vesuvius erupted on Aug. 24 in A.D. 79. The Franklin Institute pays homage to Pompeii's vibrant life with One Day in Pompeii , an exhibition of 150 artifacts from the famous Italian city now through April 24. Produced by Premier Exhibitions, Inc., the exhibition will have its world premiere at the Franklin before touring the rest of the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1987 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
Willard Scott, the wacky weatherman on NBC's "Today" show, was reporting on the weather this morning from the Franklin Institute, joined by a former rival - Channel 3's forecaster, Linda Gialanella, who used to predict the weather for ABC's "World News This Morning" before coming to Philadelphia. Scott, who has filed his reports live from Brazil to Australia, is in town to open a new exhibit at the Franklin Institute, "Born Out of Time. " The exhibit focuses on Benjamin Franklin's contributions to the world of science.
NEWS
May 3, 1990 | By Cynthia Burton, Daily News Staff Writer
If anything at the Franklin Institute's new Futures Center was going to break, it was going to break yesterday, as 1,000 kids from 13 schools descended on the $71 million exhibition hall. "They will be here all night fixing whatever breaks," said Jennifer Donnelly, of the institute's public relations department. The museum, at 21st Street and the Parkway, was closed to the public yesterday and will open tomorrow. The Futures Center is a 90,000-square-foot exhibition hall that contains eight new permanent exhibits that aim to show visitors what life in the 21st century will be like.
NEWS
January 1, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jane Grinspan, 66, of Merion, a writer, cook, and longtime publications director for the Franklin Institute, died Sunday, Dec. 30, of breast cancer, at her home. Mrs. Grinspan was a 50-year resident of the Philadelphia area. Her family said she was a renaissance woman with wide-ranging talents. In 1971, she was hired at the Franklin Institute, where she spent 39 years as a writer and editor before retiring in 2010. She relished the city's food and arts scene, and parlayed her knowledge into restaurant reviews that appeared in the Bulletin in the early 1970s.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 9, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
For the first time in nearly a half-century, the Franklin Institute's Budd BB1 Pioneer airplane, a fixture along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, actually moved. It did more than move. This biplane floated - up from its display posts in front of the building. It twirled slowly in the sun about 20 feet in the air, and then gently descended to the ground. Bump. The Budd plane is one of the institute's great artifacts, conceived and manufactured in Philadelphia, and given to the institute by the Budd Manufacturing Co. in 1935, a year after the Parkway building opened.
NEWS
August 5, 2016
By Paul Halpern Conventional wisdom suggests that Philadelphia is known for wisdom at conventions - particularly the ones that shaped our nation in the 18th century. Visitors flock to the city to see Independence Hall, Congress Hall, Carpenters' Hall, and other places where the Founding Fathers convened to debate the direction of American democracy. The Liberty Bell, perhaps the city's most famous attraction, symbolizes that fledgling era and its emerging freedoms. One of the reasons that the contemporary Democratic convention was set here was to tap into that rich tradition.
NEWS
August 3, 2016 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
The city has reached an agreement to allow the Franklin Institute to convert a sign on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway to digital, officials said Monday. The street-level sign is at 20th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway and is used to promote the museum's exhibits. The proposed conversion has been criticized since the institute applied for a permit in 2012 to update the sign. Opponents argued that allowing a digital sign would negatively impact the Parkway. "This agreement in no way means there will be more electronic signage on the Parkway," Managing Director Michael DiBerardinis said in a statement.
FOOD
July 1, 2016 | By Michael Klein, Staff Writer
We're a mobile society. Now even pop-up beer gardens can move, too. Parks on Tap - a new partnership among Philadelphia Parks and Recreation, Fairmount Park Conservancy, and Avram Hornik of FCM Hospitality - sends a mobile beer garden from park to park in the city for 14 weeks, starting Wednesday, June 29. The two trucks - one with regional craft beers, wine, and nonalcoholic drinks, and the other with snacks and sandwiches on a menu created by...
NEWS
June 19, 2016
SUMMER VACATION is a great time for kids to play in the sand, climb trees, investigate tide pools, and lift rocks in the creek to see what's underneath. There's also plenty else for them to do, from children's concerts and theater to animatronic dinos. - Michael Harrington "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone," with the Philadelphia Orchestra (June 23, Mann Center). The 2001 first installment of the boy-wizard franchise screens. Conductor Justin Freer leads the Fabulous Philadelphians in a performance of John Williams' score.
NEWS
June 6, 2016
With the recent opening of Moore College of Art & Design's juried alumni exhibition, consider the story of the first visual arts college for women in the United States: Moore's antecessor, the Philadelphia School of Design for Women (PSDW). Founded in 1848, PSDW was the first of several such institutions to appear in Boston, Pittsburgh, and Cincinnati. However, art for art's sake was not the goal of philanthropist and PSDW founder Sarah Worthington Peter. At the time of the school's inception, thousands of unmarried and widowed women worked from home, which - in the 19th century - did not mean telecommuting in one's pajamas.
SPORTS
May 19, 2016 | By Erin McCarthy, STAFF WRITER
Brennan Poole posed for photos and signed autographs Tuesday morning amid the din of elementary school classes inside the Franklin Institute. The number of auto racing fans in Philadelphia surprised the 25-year-old NASCAR rookie of the year contender. "I think sometimes we forget how many people watch these races," Poole said. "A 10-year-old came up to me and said. 'You should've won Talladega.' That was just really cool. " Poole joined fellow drivers Ty Dillon, Brandon Jones, Ryan Reed and Darrell "Bubba" Wallace Jr. for several events throughout the city to promote the NASCAR Xfinity Series and Pocono Raceway, which is 95 miles from Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 16, 2016
On April 21, the Franklin Institute held its awards ceremony and dinner. The Franklin Institute Awards is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology awards programs in the world, dating to 1824. More than 800 attended the black-tie event at the historic Franklin Institute Science Museum in Philadelphia. Guests were treated to cocktails, an awards ceremony, dinner, and a dessert reception in various halls throughout the museum. Benjamin Franklin medals were given in six fields of science and engineering, along with the Bower Awards for Achievement in science and for business leadership.
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Ronnie Polaneczky
IT GOES WITHOUT saying that if your institution is named for Benjamin Franklin, you shouldn't engage in practices that would make America's founding Everyman puke with revulsion on his buckled shoes. So shame on the Franklin Institute for demanding admissions fees for personal-care attendants who must accompany their disabled clients to the museum. And - mwah! - a big, fat kiss to U.S. District Judge Gerald A. McHugh, who just ruled against the institute, which was sued for its nasty, petty, mean-spirited penny-pinching.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
SUSAN GLASSMAN, executive director of the Wagner Free Institute of Science, went to work at the museum two decades ago and met a man who recalled visiting it in the late 1930s or early 1940s, when the technology on display was a tube for a new invention: the television. The Wagner institute has been housed in its Classical Revival-style building on Montgomery Avenue near 17th Street in North Philadelphia for 151 years. But the institute is older. Its founder, William Wagner, a merchant who traveled the world collecting fossils and other specimens, incorporated it in 1855.
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