CollectionsFranklin Institute
IN THE NEWS

Franklin Institute

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 18, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / AMY HUNTOON
The Franklin Institute's latest program is all wet - a series on several aspects of water that shows everything from how waves are created to how the Fire Department uses water. The "Make Waves" series that runs through Sunday also has workshops on the ocean, boating safety and the city's water supply. Participants may take home mini wave-makers, paper ships, and weather detectors.
NEWS
September 24, 1986
As president of the Franklin Institute, Joel N. Bloom has a perfect right, even an obligation, to defend in print that organization's decision to deaccession its historical library holdings (Op-ed Page, Sept. 15). The terms in which he has chosen to do so, however, are appalling - even shocking - and raise questions far broader than the issue at hand. One does not expect the president of a museum to respond to criticism by heaping abuse upon his opponents. The assertion that those opposed to the random dispersal of those historical books are merely nostalgic for their childhoods is absurd.
NEWS
September 15, 1986 | By Joel N. Bloom
As a museum director, I often find myself chatting with visitors. Occasionally, one will say something like, "I enjoy the exhibit on electronics, but I sorely miss the old Nickelodeon Theater. " I try to explain that it's human to want the world to remain as it was when one was a child, but that the Nickelodeon Theater occupied the same space electronics does now and that even the Franklin Institute hasn't figured out how to have two objects occupy the same space. Or to borrow a cardinal principle from science, "Change is the fundamental law of nature and that organisms (and organizations)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1994 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Franklin Institute and QVC yesterday officially announced an agreement that will put the Philadelphia science museum's gift shop at the other end of 60 million remote controls. With a two-hour pilot show to air June 26 - in a lucrative Sunday-morning time slot aimed at children - the two will test the waters for a regularly scheduled show that would hawk science-related toys, games and books on the international shop-at-home channel. The Franklin Institute's Joseph D. Moore - who will become interim president on July 1 - declined to disclose financial details of the deal.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Few ancient sites stimulate the imagination as vividly as Pompeii. The Great Pyramids of Giza have passed down to us void of life - save for the souls buried there. But Pompeii was teeming with activity, with the lives of men, women, and children when it was buried - and preserved - under ash and pumice after Mount Vesuvius erupted on Aug. 24 in A.D. 79. The Franklin Institute pays homage to Pompeii's vibrant life with One Day in Pompeii , an exhibition of 150 artifacts from the famous Italian city now through April 24. Produced by Premier Exhibitions, Inc., the exhibition will have its world premiere at the Franklin before touring the rest of the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1987 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
Willard Scott, the wacky weatherman on NBC's "Today" show, was reporting on the weather this morning from the Franklin Institute, joined by a former rival - Channel 3's forecaster, Linda Gialanella, who used to predict the weather for ABC's "World News This Morning" before coming to Philadelphia. Scott, who has filed his reports live from Brazil to Australia, is in town to open a new exhibit at the Franklin Institute, "Born Out of Time. " The exhibit focuses on Benjamin Franklin's contributions to the world of science.
NEWS
May 3, 1990 | By Cynthia Burton, Daily News Staff Writer
If anything at the Franklin Institute's new Futures Center was going to break, it was going to break yesterday, as 1,000 kids from 13 schools descended on the $71 million exhibition hall. "They will be here all night fixing whatever breaks," said Jennifer Donnelly, of the institute's public relations department. The museum, at 21st Street and the Parkway, was closed to the public yesterday and will open tomorrow. The Futures Center is a 90,000-square-foot exhibition hall that contains eight new permanent exhibits that aim to show visitors what life in the 21st century will be like.
NEWS
January 1, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jane Grinspan, 66, of Merion, a writer, cook, and longtime publications director for the Franklin Institute, died Sunday, Dec. 30, of breast cancer, at her home. Mrs. Grinspan was a 50-year resident of the Philadelphia area. Her family said she was a renaissance woman with wide-ranging talents. In 1971, she was hired at the Franklin Institute, where she spent 39 years as a writer and editor before retiring in 2010. She relished the city's food and arts scene, and parlayed her knowledge into restaurant reviews that appeared in the Bulletin in the early 1970s.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2016 | Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
In recent weeks, the postings on Craigslist have taken on a desperate tone: "Looking for two tickets for . . . Jan 12th. Willing to negotiate price. " "In search of 1 ticket. . . . Price negotiable!" "Forgot to purchase, and they are now sold out. Please email or text if have tickets. " These hot tickets were for, of all places, the Franklin Institute - more specifically, Science After Hours, the museum's monthly, no-kids-allowed science rave. More than 2,600 people bought tickets for the Tuesday-night event, a speakeasy-theme gathering focused on the science of booze and bootlegging.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2015
Kids out of school for the holidays? You could take them to the Star Wars film at the Franklin Institute's IMAX theater. They could amble through the heart's arteries or marvel at stars in the planetarium. Or they could gaze at Jamie Maguire's hair stuck to a bicycle helmet. Why is his hair and helmet on display? Consider it an object lesson. The reason James "Jamie" Maguire Jr., 55, was able to give $1.5 million to the Franklin Institute was, in part, because the helmet saved his life in a bicycle crash last year.
NEWS
November 13, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 1,400 light-years away, in a constellation named for its likeness to a swan, lies a planet a lot like Earth. Called Kepler-452b, it orbits a star similar to our sun, at just the right distance so that its surface temperature would allow the presence of liquid water. We would have no idea it was out there, along with more than 1,000 other planets discovered in the last six years, but for the stubbornness of William J. Borucki. The NASA astronomer is one of eight new winners of the annual awards bestowed by the Franklin Institute being announced Thursday.
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia History Museum at the Atwater Kent and the Woodmere Art Museum are exploring a partnership that could produce a merged institution devoted to exhibiting more than three centuries' worth of the region's entire range of art and artifacts, according to officials at both institutions. The exploration process, funded by William Penn Foundation grants of $867,075 to each institution, will initially lead to a joint public exhibition opening in about a year at both, tentatively titled "A More Perfect Union.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2015 | Lauren McCutcheon, Daily News Staff Writer
Running in museums: Typically prohibited. Running in the Franklin Institute's recently renovated SportsZone : Totally encouraged. When the 3,600-square-foot, 21-interactive-activity, new-gym-smelling permanent exhibit reopens to the public Saturday, expect a long line for "Athletes in Action. " The 40-foot dash lets two visitors compete side-by-side against virtual versions of (choose one!) Eagles WR Jordan Matthews, wheelchair racer Tatyana McFadden, a marathon runner, a Paralympic sprinter or the comparatively slow yet surprisingly speedy (considering that tummy)
NEWS
October 2, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
WITH "THE MARTIAN" generating terrific early buzz (see Gary Thompson 's 4-star review and interviews with star Chiwetel Ejiofor and author Andy Weir starting on Page 25), 20th Century Fox is pulling out all the stops to get people into theaters. Part of their campaign landed stars Sebastian Stan and Mackenzie Davis , the film's NASA consultant Dr. Jim "Mr. Mars" Green and retired NASA astronaut Nicole Stott at the Franklin Institute Planetarium on Wednesday for a discussion with chief astronomer Derrick Pitts . We got a little space with the foursome before the event.
NEWS
August 18, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN MILTON Freedman put the announcement of his mother's death online, the shock spread across the country. "I was blown away by the messages people sent in," Milton said. "How respected she was. How many friends she had. " His mother, Brenda Ruth Freedman, was a quiet force in many people's lives. "She touched and changed the lives of many," her son said. One man told how Brenda was someone he could always go to with his problems, talk them through and get good advice. "He said he didn't know what he was going to do without her," Milton said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2015 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sure, Billy the goat is cute and Duck Girl is elegant, but we think the sculpture that's the most fun in Rittenhouse Square is Antoine-Louis Barye's 1832 work Lion Crushing a Serpent . (Well, maybe not for the snake, but for everybody else.) That's because you can fit your arm through the lion's mouth and make it look like you're Tarzan. Judging from the worn spots on the bronze around the big cat's jaws and teeth, it looks like many generations have figured this out. (There's also evidence of sympathy for the slithery reptile - the snake's head is polished to a butterscotch hue, as well.)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2015 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
Be honest: Everybody likes to get muddy, slimy, oozy, or gooey - it's just that kids are way better at it because they have that great excuse of being, well, kids. As we get older and larger, we need to find reasons for getting messy - gardening, fixing the car, running. Here's a new one: Science! The Franklin Institute's popular Mess Fest returns for a fourth year, bigger and better, with different themes for each day - "Nasty Nature," "Art and Design," Splish Splash," and "Gross Anatomy" - and demonstrations including the watermelon blast, mud volcano, trash-can rocket, bubble explosion, and paint bucket dump.
FOOD
July 17, 2015 | Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
City's Latest Hot Roast Philly's ever-perking cafe scene has produced another gem - this one for Logan Square. Peddler Coffee Alchemy, a Port Richmond-based roaster that made its first public forays last year at the Franklin Flea, has settled a permanent cafe with Third Wave style (exposed brick, pour-overs) into the former Darling's space at 21st and Spring Streets behind the Franklin Institute. Peddler leans toward lighter roasts (no "carbon flavor"), but keeps it accessible. I was especially impressed with this Nicaraguan Santa Candida, which is one of Peddler's workhorse beans, prepared with equal success as espresso, iced and silky smooth off the slow-dripping Kyoto brewer, or simply as a traditional drip-filter.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|