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Franklin Mills

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BUSINESS
May 19, 1988 | By NANCY HASS, Daily News Staff Writer
Reading, the town that put outlet shopping on the map, may have some stiff competition from Franklin Mills come next spring, but officials there say they aren't worried. The interest in outlets generated by the giant mall, which is scheduled for completion in April, will help everyone, they say. And besides, Reading's no- frills, warehouse feel will always attract customers searching for "the real thing," they add. Franklin Mills "is a different animal," said Richard Maloof, general manager of the Reading Outlet Center, one of several complexes in Berks County that house a total of 250 vendor-controlled stores and off-price retailers.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1992 | by Valerie M. Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
Bloomingdale's has closed its Franklin Mills store, the retailer's first off-price outlet, because it has reached an agreement with the discount chain, Marshall's, to sell off its excess merchandise instead. "We found an alternative means of getting rid of all of our merchandise without having to operate a store. And that's a great advantage," Gordon R. Cooke, chief executive officer of Bloomingdale's By Mail Ltd., the catalog subsidiary of Bloomingdale's, said yesterday. Bloomingdale's The Outlet Shop closed its doors last week after arriving at Franklin Mills as an anchor with great hoopla last October.
NEWS
July 29, 1990 | By Sydney Trent, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reading China & Glass, one of five anchors at Franklin Mills mall, will vacate its space at the giant discount shopping complex Tuesday. A spokesman for the discount housewares chain said the store had taken more space than it could handle. "We do a fair amount of business, but not enough to maintain that size store," said Jeffrey Brok, senior director of operations. Brok said Reading had tentative plans to open a smaller store at Franklin Mills. "But right now, it's just a consideration," he said.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1990 | By Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
Saks Fifth Avenue will open the doors to its first ever retail outlet store tomorrow at Franklin Mills. Covering 25,000 square feet, "The Clearinghouse" will stock off-season merchandise drawn from the upscale retailer's chain of 46 full-service stores around the country. "The accumulation of merchandise that remains from the big chain has to be disposed of in some way," Sidney Mayer, senior vice president of merchandise and planning, said of Saks' decision to finally add an outlet.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1991 | by Paul Maryniak, Daily News Staff Writer
The Goode administration has taken the first step toward giving a tax break to spur expansion of financially troubled Franklin Mills shopping mall. But the Rendell administration will have the last word on whether to extend the lifeline to the sprawling shopping center in Northeast Philadelphia because there is not enough time left this year to complete any deal. Goode yesterday submitted a bill to City Council declaring a specific area around the mall "blighted" so that Franklin Mills could qualify for interest-free loans from the city to help finance a $25-million addition to its 1.4 million square feet.
NEWS
October 13, 1991 | By Jeff Brown, Inquirer Staff Writer
The immense Franklin Mills mall, heralded two years ago as a white knight for a wobbly economy, is losing millions of dollars and struggling to stay afloat. Buffeted by poor sales, an inability to get loans, legal battles among its owners and the failure of a third of its stores to pay full rent, the sprawling Northeast Philadelphia mall has turned to the city for a tax break to make new construction affordable. But city officials, who are concerned about the mall's ability to repay debts, are wary of the company's proposal to use a form of city-assisted financing that has never been tried in Philadelphia and has drawn criticism elsewhere.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | By Sydney Trent, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the eve of its one-year anniversary earlier this month, Franklin Mills mall was basking in the national spotlight. In a lavish two-page spread in an April edition of Women's Wear Daily, a leading national publication covering the retail industry, a mall official said sales were averaging $300 per square foot - a figure comfortably above average, according to retail analysts. And nine days before the May 11 anniversary, a segment on the CBS Morning News extolled Franklin Mills as "the shopping mall of the future.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1989 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / RON TARVER
It may not be quite there yet, but Franklin Mills should be ready in time for its grand opening Thursday. With a $300 million price tag, the shopping mall holds the record as the costliest private development in Philadelphia's history. And the 1.8 million square feet of selling area will make it the biggest single mall in the area. Yesterday, in preparation for next week's opening, the Franklin Mills developers held a tour. Unlike other malls, all of Franklin Mills will be filled with outlet and off-price stores.
NEWS
April 10, 1993 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
The opening of Nordstrom Factory Direct at Franklin Mills will be postponed until Aug. 5, officials of the Seattle-based Nordstrom's chain said. A Nordstrom executive said it had taken longer than expected to relocate the tenants now in the space Nordstrom will rent. Renovations on the 40,000- square-foot space are to begin this month. The store, which will carry discounted men's and women's clothing and shoes, was to open at the Northeast Philadelphia outlet mall in May. It will be the first Nordstrom-owned store in the Philadelphia region.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1992 | By Donna Shaw and Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The Rendell administration has rejected a request by the developers of Franklin Mills for help in raising up to $16 million for improvements at the huge outlet mall. In a letter to Herbert S. Miller, chairman and chief executive of Western Development Corp., of Washington, the mall's developer, Rendell said that even the company's most recent, pared-down proposal was "simply too large a financing" for the cash-strapped city to undertake. Hit hard by the recession and its inability to get construction loans, the owner of the Northeast Philadelphia mall originally had asked the city for help in raising $15 million to $25 million under a new state law designed to assist blighted areas.
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BUSINESS
March 11, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
If shopping malls are really dying - killed by retail apps, next-day delivery, and those giant "fulfillment centers" rising across Pennsylvania - you wouldn't know it. Not the way big investors like Simon Property Group are buying and selling rival shopping malls. On Monday, Simon - the Indianapolis company that owns one of the largest malls in the United States ( King of Prussia ) and the biggest in Philadelphia ( Philadelphia Mills , the former Franklin Mills) - offered $22 billion, or $91 a share, for national mall chain Macerich Co. , of Santa Monica, Calif.
NEWS
October 14, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
THE NOTION of swapping a used cellphone for instant cash at a kiosk attracts a lot of people, but sometimes for the wrong reasons. Cellphone-buyback machines were a subject of controversy last year when City Council tried for an outright ban. Critics said the machines incentivized cellphone thieves looking for a quick buck. The legislation stalled in committee and was never approved. But Council passed a bill Thursday that reached a compromise. Instead of barring these types of machines - which recycle handheld electronic devices and fork over cash in exchange - the city now will allow installation of kiosks, but the placement of each must be approved by Council.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The mall landlord that controls the Philadelphia area's biggest shopping areas is giving each a face-lift, in hopes they will remain destinations amid the relentless rise of online and smartphone-based retail. Simon Property Group , based in Indianapolis, said Tuesday it was renaming its 25-year-old, 1.8 million-square-foot complex on Woodhaven Road Philadelphia Mills , dropping the Franklin Mills name and replacing its bright-colored building blocks at the main entrances.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Sean still remembers when Jamie transferred into the sixth-grade class at Nazareth Academy Grade School in Northeast Philadelphia in 1997. With just 27 students, a new girl - especially a cute one - made an impression. Back then, Sean was quiet and shy, Jamie said. They hardly talked at first, but she suspected he had a crush on her. He did, but never acted on it. With so few classmates, "Everyone was friends, and we all hung out together," Sean remembered. After eighth-grade graduation, Jamie, who grew up in Southampton and Horsham, continued at Nazareth Academy High School, and Sean, who grew up in the Northeast, went to Holy Ghost Prep.
NEWS
December 27, 2013 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
A sky-high crane dangles over a corner of Franklin Mills Mall these days, but it is more than a towering construction tool: It is a symbol of how necessity is the mother of reinvention at this once-legendary shopping mall. A Walmart Supercenter is taking shape at the once-pioneering complex, which opened nearly 25 years ago with theme-park anticipation as among the first outlet malls, and the outright largest, ever built. The splashy development, unveiled in 1989, was a gamble befitting its locale, a onetime Northeast Philadelphia racetrack.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | BY JAD SLEIMAN, Daily News Staff Writer sleimaj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
CITY COUNCIL is taking a close look at fully automated kiosks that dish out cash for used electronic devices - with one eye on Philly's climbing cellphone-theft rates. The robo pawn shops accept used phones, tablets and MP3 players, assess their value and instantly pay up. Council's Public Safety Committee invited law-enforcement and industry representatives to a City Hall hearing yesterday to discuss banning the machines. They decided to form a task force to further examine their risks.
NEWS
September 20, 2013 | By Carrie Rickey, For The Inquirer
In Hollywood, facelifts are so commonplace it won't raise an eyebrow that on the eve of its 75th birthday, The Wizard of Oz has had some work done. Digital wizards have converted the beloved 1939 film to 3-D for a one-week-only engagement at Imax theaters from Friday through Sept. 26. Oz is so hallucinatory to begin with that a 3-D retrofit threatens, with the force of a Kansas twister, to blow moviegoer minds. Happily, the conversion has been done with restraint and respect.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2012
John Ahle Jr. has been hired as general manager at Franklin Mills , the shopping mall in Northeast Philadelphia. He had been president of Pettinaro Management L.L.C. for Pettinaro Real Estate Co. Westtown School, a Quaker pre-K-to-12 school in West Chester, hired Karen Illig as chief financial officer. Illig previously served as director of finance/CFO at the Center for Early Education in West Hollywood, Calif. Please Touch Museum named Lynn McMaster executive vice president.
NEWS
August 22, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The movie was Perfect Stranger . The person calling the cellphone belonging to Wykia Townsend's boyfriend was anyone but. And so began a five-year legal journey of trial delays and changed lawyers that ended Monday with Townsend, 28, reluctantly pleading no-contest to third-degree murder. In April 2007 she tried to run down her lover's ex-girlfriend but instead killed the perceived rival's sister and injured her mother and 5-year-old daughter. Townsend was immediately sentenced to a negotiated 15 to 30 years in prison by Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Linda Carpenter.
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