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Franklin Mint

NEWS
June 3, 1994 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
With a young violinist's music creating the perfect ambience for the evening, the artists and their guests took in the artwork in the Frankin Mint Museum's Celebrity Hallway. The walls were covered with all kinds of photographs - close-ups of flowers, trees observed from every angle, serene wood settings and refreshing water scenes. The display was the culmination of a six-month project in which a group of Glenwood Elementary School students used photography as a means to study the world.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1995 | By Jerry W. Byrd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Franklin Mint, a mail-order marketer of collectibles in Delaware County, has told employees it may have to trim its U.S. workforce by as much as 10 percent to compensate for slower-than-expected growth this year. The cuts could mean the loss of 160 jobs out of a workforce of 1,600, but spokesman Jack Wilkie said nothing close to that number was expected. "We're making some adjustments on a department-by-department basis, but these aren't across-the-board cuts," Wilkie said.
NEWS
August 24, 1998 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Work has begun on a two-story addition to the state police barracks on West Baltimore Pike that will give the troopers a little more elbow room. The barracks is next to the Franklin Mint. It is owned by the mint and leased by the state police. As part of the nine-month project, the existing 10,000-square-foot facility will be gutted and renovated, said Lt. Barry Sparks, commander of the barracks. The facility will be reconfigured to take advantage of the new space, he said.
NEWS
April 14, 2011 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The former Franklin Mint, the coins and collectibles manufacturer, sits like a hulking hull of concrete above what remains a bucolic stretch of Route 1 in Middletown Township, Delaware County. Surrounded by 173 acres, it is part of a parcel zoned to permit a large office complex and a couple of houses to be built there. Instead, a partnership of four development companies has spent the past six years trying to persuade skeptical residents to try something radically different.
NEWS
January 25, 2011 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Developers are taking a second crack at building on the Franklin Mint site, the former home of a coin-and-collectible company that occupies more than 150 acres of prime, undeveloped real estate along Baltimore Pike in Delaware County. But the plan, which would create a town center with retail, housing, and a hotel with as many as 225 rooms, has drawn sharp criticism from residents who worry the development is too dense and could congest traffic in the area. The Middletown Township Council will hold a public hearing on the plan at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at Penncrest High School.
NEWS
January 24, 2011 | By WILLIAM BENDER, benderw@phillynews.com 215-854-5255
THE PLAN, in the eyes of the development team, is to "transform the former Franklin Mint site into a vibrant, mixed-use, walkable community" that will "create a sense of place" for Middletown Township. Going by the tone of the hate mail circulating in the town of 16,000 residents, you'd think the proposal was for a Ground Zero mosque in the center of Delaware County. Civil dialogue appears to be breaking down in Middletown leading up to tomorrow's public hearing, when the developers - Pennrose Properties, the McKee Group, Wolfson Verrichia and the Dewey Cos. - will outline their plan to build homes, offices, retail space and a hotel on 173 acres along Baltimore Pike formerly occupied by the Franklin Mint.
NEWS
March 31, 2009 | By Joelle Farrell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A plan to build a town center at the former Franklin Mint site in Middletown Township, Delaware County, is beginning to take shape - again. The Franklin Mint, the coin and collectibles manufacturer, vacated its offices along Baltimore Pike in 2004. Developers bought the dormant site along with nearby parcels, drawing together 150 acres. Initial plans for the site - including a 300-room hotel, 1.3 million square feet of retail space, and 1,300 residential units - were shot down by the Township Council in 2006 after a heated campaign by residents, whose slogan was "No City.
LIVING
August 30, 1998 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Children sent pocket change taped to pictures they'd drawn of the princess. The elderly signed over pension checks. Money poured in faster than it could be counted. In the first few months, the overwhelmed staff at the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund sorted through $23 million in contributions with no clear sense of how the proceeds would be spent. "It was very overwhelming," recounted fund spokeswoman Jo Greensted of the frantic autumn months. "It was stackfuls of mail every day, and it all had to be gone through by a very small number of people.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1998 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Franklin Mint Corp., one of the world's largest marketers of collectibles, yesterday denied reports the mint is for sale. Mona Liss, a spokeswoman for the mint, yesterday denied reports that the Delaware County company had hired Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette, a New York investment-banking firm, to market the privately held mint. "Normally, we do not comment on rumors, but the statements, as printed, are untrue," said Liss. The New York Post yesterday reported the owners of the Franklin Mint, Stewart and Lynda Resnick, wanted to sell the company because they had grown tired of its legal troubles.
NEWS
September 25, 1995 | By Jada S. Gallagher, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jack Harris said he "kicks" himself for not keeping some of the 28 cars he collected during the Depression, when automobile owners often abandoned their costly machines in empty lots. These days, the Quakertown car buff can't seem to get his hands on enough old cars to find a special pipe needed to complete his rebuilt '35 Buick. But because Harris attended the Franklin Mint's antique car show yesterday, his eight-year search for a "gooseneck" for his Buick may soon come to an end. "I met someone with a '34 Buick, and he gave me some names and some ideas," said Harris, adjusting his Ford baseball cap. "You know, there were only 1,800 of 'em made like the kind I have, so finding parts these days is pretty rough.
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