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Franklin Mint

NEWS
September 13, 1999 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Thomas DeFulvio, 47, was a teenager when he took his last ride on a Red Arrow Line bus. Clem Maher, 79, said his final trip on the former Delaware County and Main Line public transportation service was as a driver working out of the company's Ardmore garage. The two men met yesterday at the Franklin Mint 13th annual Automobile Festival, where DeFulvio had come to show off his restored 1959 Red Arrow bus. "My mom took me on these buses at age 2 on shopping trips to 69th Street.
NEWS
May 20, 1998 | By Sudarsan Raghavan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Anne Barnard contributed to this story
"Celebrate the enduring style, beauty and compassion of the unforgettable Diana, Princess of Wales," invites the advertisement. How? By purchasing from the Franklin Mint a "lifelike vinyl" Diana, "the People's Princess Doll," complete with the blue and khaki outfit she wore in Angola when she campaigned against land mines, one of her favorite causes. But the doll, advertised in national magazines, celebrates the princess's memory without the permission of her estate, lawyers representing the Princess Diana Memorial Fund contend in a lawsuit filed Monday against the Wawa, Delaware County, company in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles.
NEWS
November 13, 2003 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Move over House of Faberge Imperial game table, the Athene and Pegasus sculpture, and the Princess Grace vinyl portrait doll (just $195). That titan of tchotchkes, the Franklin Mint, is planning a new focus on its die-cast cars, airplanes and Harley-Davidson collectibles, and dismissing two-thirds of its Franklin Center workforce. The Delaware County company notified 200 employees yesterday that they would be laid off as part of a business restructuring plan. "It's the death of the Franklin Mint and the death of every company that's out there saying we're in the collectibles business," said Pam Danziger, president of Unity Marketing in Stevens, Pa., and author of the 2002 book Why People Buy Things They Don't Need.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1988 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
You probably wouldn't rush to an amateur theatrical starring visual artists Red Grooms and Susan Rothenberg. Nor would you hasten to a nonprofessional jazz jam fronted by painters Larry Rivers and Frank Stella. So why consider an exhibition of paintings by celebrities, even if their number includes Candice Bergen, Duke Ellington, Henry Fonda, Peggy Lee and Red Skelton? Because, as the Franklin Mint Museum's "Celebrity Art Exhibit" (now through Sept. 25) demonstrates, amateur art discloses the character of its maker.
NEWS
December 23, 1994 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former top male executive of the Franklin Mint has sued the company and a female owner, contending that she pushed him into a sexual relationship, then got him fired after he ended their affair. The female owner and the mint, meanwhile, have sued the former executive, contending that he tried to commit blackmail and extort $5 million by threatening to expose the affair with secretly recorded phone conversations and photographs. Jerrold W. Ross, former senior vice president for advertising and retailing at the mint, says in his suit, filed last month in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, that Lynda R. Resnick, an officer and owner of the mint, "made unwelcome sexual advances.
NEWS
May 19, 1998 | REUTERS Inquirer staff writer Anne Barnard and the Associated Press contributed to this article
Princess Diana's estate and charitable fund yesterday sued the Franklin Mint, a Delaware County company that makes memorial plates and other items, claiming it was unlawfully exploiting her name "like vultures feeding on the dead. " The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, contends that the company was using Diana's name and likeness to sell its products even though the estate had refused to issue it a license. A call to the Franklin Mint in Wawa yesterday afternoon was referred to the legal department, where no one was immediately available for comment.
NEWS
November 26, 1992 | For The Inquirer / DAVID J. JACKSON
A regional Scrabble tournament last weekend drew about 160 people to the Franklin Mint in Middletown. Some of the best players in the country participated.
NEWS
December 10, 1996 | For The Inquirer / ROGER TUNIS
The famed artist of the Brandywine, Andrew Wyeth (right), accepts the American Heritage Award from M. Theresa Heintz, general chairwoman of the Columbus Quincentennial Foundation. Robert N. Speare (left) and Delaware County Council Chairman Paul G. Mattus were also present for the Dec. 5 ceremony at the Franklin Mint.
NEWS
May 6, 1991 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patricia Ann McCafferty Murray, 45, a 20-year employee of the Franklin Mint, died Friday at Mease Hospital in Dunedin, Fla. Born in Fernwood, Pa., she graduated from Archbishop Prendergast High School in Drexel Hill in 1963. Mrs. Murray soon joined the Franklin Mint, working for almost 20 years as a customer representative. She moved to Florida nine years ago. Mrs. Murray was a member of St. Ignatius Catholic Church of Tarpon Springs, Fla. She is survived by her husband, Francis; three sisters, Clare Walton, Jean Nespoli and Marie Ashfield, and several nieces and nephews.
NEWS
October 26, 1986 | By Mary Lee Benton, Special to The Inquirer
The board of the Rose Tree Media School District last week discussed what has become a major tax-revenue issue in the district: the value of the Franklin Mint property in Middletown. The district last month appealed in Delaware County Court the assessment of the market value of the Franklin Mint property on Baltimore Pike. That appeal is scheduled to be heard sometime this week. John Steuerwald, solicitor for the district, said at Thursday's meeting, "The owners of the mint assessed the property at $1 million, when we feel that it was worth much more.
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