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Franklin Mint

NEWS
February 5, 1999 | by Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Wu-Tang Clan star ODB has managed to dodge one bullet: The latest investigation against the trouble-making rapper is being dropped. Prosecutors were expected to announce today that they have dismissed attempted-murder charges against Ol' Dirty Bastard. A grand jury decided not to indict him after witnesses provided details on the Jan. 15 incident, in which ODB was accused of shooting at police officers outside a cousin's Brooklyn home. "The only individuals that fired shots were the police officers," said defense attorney Peter Frankel.
NEWS
September 21, 1998 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
The practice of collecting toys ceased long ago to be kid stuff. In a hobby in which a mint-condition GI Joe doll from the 1960s can command up to $1,000 and a 1959 Ponytail Barbie can fetch $4,000 or more, collectors can't afford to get playful with their acquisitions, advises Hot Toys magazine. In fact, don't even break the cellophane on the box. "Toys in their original packaging compound their value. And mint by definition means flawless and unused," said Mike Jaspersen, auction faciliator for Beckett Publishers, the Hot Toys parent company.
LIVING
August 30, 1998 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Children sent pocket change taped to pictures they'd drawn of the princess. The elderly signed over pension checks. Money poured in faster than it could be counted. In the first few months, the overwhelmed staff at the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund sorted through $23 million in contributions with no clear sense of how the proceeds would be spent. "It was very overwhelming," recounted fund spokeswoman Jo Greensted of the frantic autumn months. "It was stackfuls of mail every day, and it all had to be gone through by a very small number of people.
NEWS
August 24, 1998 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Work has begun on a two-story addition to the state police barracks on West Baltimore Pike that will give the troopers a little more elbow room. The barracks is next to the Franklin Mint. It is owned by the mint and leased by the state police. As part of the nine-month project, the existing 10,000-square-foot facility will be gutted and renovated, said Lt. Barry Sparks, commander of the barracks. The facility will be reconfigured to take advantage of the new space, he said.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1998 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Franklin Mint Corp., one of the world's largest marketers of collectibles, yesterday denied reports the mint is for sale. Mona Liss, a spokeswoman for the mint, yesterday denied reports that the Delaware County company had hired Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette, a New York investment-banking firm, to market the privately held mint. "Normally, we do not comment on rumors, but the statements, as printed, are untrue," said Liss. The New York Post yesterday reported the owners of the Franklin Mint, Stewart and Lynda Resnick, wanted to sell the company because they had grown tired of its legal troubles.
NEWS
May 22, 1998 | By Sudarsan Raghavan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The proposal seemed worthy enough. Hundreds of thousands of dollars were to be donated by the Franklin Mint from the sale of Princess Diana porcelain commemorative plates to treat sick children at London's Great Ormond Street Hospital, one of Diana's favorite charities. But this week, hospital officials were told that the mint, based in Wawa, Delaware County, had never received permission to make the plates from the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund - which holds the exclusive license to her name and image.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1998 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
If the Franklin Mint issues a plate with your face on it or a doll that looks like you - without your permission - you, too, can sue and maybe collect a mint, says Los Angeles attorney Mark Lee. Lee won a "substantial settlement" from the Franklin Mint for golfer Tiger Woods just last month. This week he filed suit against the collectibles company on behalf of the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund. The company, headquartered in Lima, Delaware County, has said it was just trying to be nice.
NEWS
May 20, 1998 | By Sudarsan Raghavan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Anne Barnard contributed to this story
"Celebrate the enduring style, beauty and compassion of the unforgettable Diana, Princess of Wales," invites the advertisement. How? By purchasing from the Franklin Mint a "lifelike vinyl" Diana, "the People's Princess Doll," complete with the blue and khaki outfit she wore in Angola when she campaigned against land mines, one of her favorite causes. But the doll, advertised in national magazines, celebrates the princess's memory without the permission of her estate, lawyers representing the Princess Diana Memorial Fund contend in a lawsuit filed Monday against the Wawa, Delaware County, company in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles.
NEWS
May 19, 1998 | REUTERS Inquirer staff writer Anne Barnard and the Associated Press contributed to this article
Princess Diana's estate and charitable fund yesterday sued the Franklin Mint, a Delaware County company that makes memorial plates and other items, claiming it was unlawfully exploiting her name "like vultures feeding on the dead. " The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, contends that the company was using Diana's name and likeness to sell its products even though the estate had refused to issue it a license. A call to the Franklin Mint in Wawa yesterday afternoon was referred to the legal department, where no one was immediately available for comment.
NEWS
December 12, 1997 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Maria Michela Foglietta, 78, sister of Thomas Foglietta, the U.S. ambassador to Italy, died of pneumonia yesterday at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital in Darby. Miss Foglietta, who went by "Margaret" or "Marge," lived in South Philadelphia until about eight years ago when she lost her sight in both eyes within two weeks. She then lived at the Regina Nursing Home in West Philadelphia. The ambassador said he had been planning to move her to Rome. "I looked forward to walking with her in the gardens and describing the beauty of this place," said Foglietta, who added that he learned of his sister's death only hours before presenting his credentials to Italian President Oscar Luigi Scalfaro.
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