CollectionsFranklin Mint
IN THE NEWS

Franklin Mint

LIVING
October 26, 1997 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What's your fancy, luv? A Princess Di doll, stamp, coin, calendar, tape, CD or cup? Perhaps a porcelain plate? Could we interest you in a book, perhaps? It took about two weeks for the frenzy of Diana's funeral to quiet before the marketing mania took over. Since her death on Aug. 31, Diana collectibles have been reinvented, reissued, redesigned and resold. And then there are more than a dozen books, including Andrew Morton's rewritten Diana: Her True Story, with its title addendum, "In Her Own Words," raking in the dough.
SPORTS
June 27, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
The Franklin Mint, sued by Tiger Woods, has agreed to temporarily stop advertising and shipping a medal commemorating the Masters champion. Stewart and Lynda Resnick, their company, Roll International, and its division, the Franklin Mint, were named in papers filed June 16 in U.S. District Court in the Central District of California. Eight days after Woods filed suit, his representatives learned the Resnicks had begun shipping the medal - months in advance of the previously announced release date, said Linda Dozoretz, a spokeswoman for International Management Group, which manages the golfer.
SPORTS
June 17, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Representatives for Tiger Woods yesterday filed a federal suit against the Franklin Mint, claiming a medal commemorating the golfer's Masters victory is an unauthorized use of his image. Stewart and Lynda Resnick, their company, Roll International, and its division, the Franklin Mint, were named in papers filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles. Woods's lawyers asked for a jury trial, and requested a preliminary injunction to stop the mint from "pirating Tiger Woods's name and likeness.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Two months before the presidential election last fall, sculptor Don Everhart 2d of Westtown began to call every source he could think of, including the White House and the Democratic National Committee. The items Everhart requested could be found almost everywhere - on campaign posters and magazine covers and in newspapers - but he had a specific image in mind. On Monday, the images Everhart created of President Clinton and Vice President Gore will take him to the Inaugural Ball as the official artist of the presidential inaugural medal.
NEWS
December 10, 1996 | For The Inquirer / ROGER TUNIS
The famed artist of the Brandywine, Andrew Wyeth (right), accepts the American Heritage Award from M. Theresa Heintz, general chairwoman of the Columbus Quincentennial Foundation. Robert N. Speare (left) and Delaware County Council Chairman Paul G. Mattus were also present for the Dec. 5 ceremony at the Franklin Mint.
NEWS
August 30, 1996 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Martin Francis Walsh, 73, of Media, a retired executive of the Franklin Mint in Wawa, died Tuesday at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Mr. Walsh worked for the Franklin Mint for 20 years and was senior vice president when he retired in 1984. He had joined the mint as controller and was a controller with the Ford Motor Co. in Chicago. A native of Medford, Mass., he graduated from Medford High School and earned bachelor's and master's degrees in business administration at Northeastern University in Boston.
NEWS
July 16, 1996 | Ellen Gray and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Some guys never learn how to make a girl happy. Meg Ryan, star of the new Gulf War movie "Courage Under Fire," is baffled by a gift she received at a Pennsylvania dinner for military heroes. Ryan and "Courage" co-star Denzel Washington attended the Congressional Medal of Honor Society dinner in Hershey on June 15, and Washington received the group's Bob Hope National Artist Award for his heroic portrayal of military figures in several films. Ryan received a board game. Ryan talked about the gift on "The Rosie O'Donnell Show" last week: "They gave Denzel an award, and they gave me a Monopoly game, and I can't figure out why. " "I think they dissed you, Meg," O'Donnell responded.
LIVING
June 27, 1996 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
And if you act now, you can receive this triple strand of genuine faux pearls, just like the ones worn by beloved first lady Jacqueline Kennedy. These luxurious, artificial pearls, complete with silver clasp, are an exact replica of the original artificial pearls purchased at Sotheby's "auction of the century" for $211,500, and reproduced by the Franklin Mint in all their stunning detail. How much would you expect to pay for the grandeur and majesty of Camelot? $100,000? $500,000?
NEWS
April 26, 1996 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article contains information from Inquirer wire services
A set of John F. Kennedy's golf clubs sold for $772,500. One of Jackie Kennedy Onassis' riding saddles drew $90,500. Ashtrays, earrings and candy dishes went for dizzying prices. It was Day 3 of the liquidation of Camelot, and there wasn't a bargain in sight. Since it began Tuesday night, the four-day auction of Onassis' estate has produced a frenzy at Sotheby's Auction House in New York City. By the time the sale ends today, Sotheby's expects to have sold catalogs to 100,000 people considering a bid for a tangible connection with history.
NEWS
February 12, 1996 | By Natalie Pompilio, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Cal Massey said that the wonderful images that appear on his canvases come to him during his daily meditations. He jots them on notecards and stores them in a filing cabinet that stands near the easel in his studio. "Everything in my work is spiritual," the 70-year-old artist said. Entering the artist's home/gallery studio on Dawson Street is almost a spiritual experience in itself. Messiah, a rendition of a black Christ as one with the earth, standing between the galaxies and the oceans, is the first painting a visitor notices.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|