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Franz Kline

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June 27, 1986 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Pennsylvania-born Franz Josef Kline, named for the Austrian emperor, was just another of the legion of starving artists populating New York's Greenwich Village in the late 1940s when he discovered an instrument called the Bell- Opticon. It turned his life around. Within little more than a decade, Kline owned a new silver-gray Ferrari, a black Thunderbird and a summer home in Provincetown, and was touring Europe in grand style. The Bell-Opticon may not have been the whole story, but it helped open Kline's eyes to new possibilities in the art world.
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
During the glory years of the New York School, Franz Kline developed an abstract painting language that was so distinctive it's immediately identifiable, and so strongly linked to him that no other artist could dare imitate it. Just as Jackson Pollock is known for drips and loops of colored pigment, Kline constructed his pictures with bold, intersecting black bars and curves on a white ground. His 1960 oil Turin , part of a revealing Kline exhibition at the Allentown Art Museum, is quintessential.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1986 | By TAMARA JEFFRIES, Daily News Staff Writer
If the women you see in Franz Kline's paintings remind you of 1940s movie stars, you're not alone. According to Dr. Harry Gaugh, guest curator of a retrospective of Kline's work - on exhibit at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts through September 28 - Kline loved those "female types. " You know, the "extroverted woman who flaunts her physicality," as Gaugh puts it. So it seems appropriate that the academy would schedule a "Movie Siren Film Festival" to accompany the exhibit, "The Vital Gesture: Franz Kline in Retrospect.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
After more than three hours of testimony, a preliminary hearing has been continued until October for a Philadelphia man accused of selling forged paintings to an Abington physician. Stanley Strauss, 47, of the 7700 block of Bradford Street, is accused of selling five forged paintings said to be by American artist Franz Kline to Arthur Weiss of Abington for $9,500. A second hearing to determine whether Strauss should be held for trial is scheduled for Oct. 2. Strauss was arrested in March after an investigation that began last July, when Weiss went to police questioning the authenticity of the paintings.
NEWS
July 9, 1986 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Museum, Tina Howe's satirical play set in an art musuem, will be presented this week in a Philadelphia art museum, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. It will be staged tonight and tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday at 2 p.m. in the academy's auditorium by the Hedgerow Theater in connection with the museum's current exhibition, "The Vital Gesture: Franz Kline in Retrospect. " Kline, who died in 1962, was in every sense a modern artist, and it is modern art that Howe spoofs in Museum.
NEWS
September 18, 1986 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
"My mind went zoom," says dancer and choreographer Trina A. Collins, describing her reaction to the Franz Kline exhibit at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. "I'd seen his paintings before, but seeing them all together was different. " As a result of that mind-zap - or zoom - Collins and members of her dance troupe, Danceteller, will perform Homage, a dance inspired by the Kline paintings, at the academy Saturday and Sunday at 4 p.m. "The Nijinsky painting and the still lifes are wonderful," Collins explains, "but they don't make me want to dance.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia man who claimed he was a close friend of the late American artist Franz Kline has been charged with selling four forged works of the painter to an Abington doctor for $9,500. The doctor told police he became suspicious of Stanley Strauss, who advertised himself as a dealer in authenticated art, when he later read a newspaper account of a $2.75 million sale of a Kline painting. Strauss, 47, of the 7700 block of Bradford Street, was arraigned yesterday before Abington District Justice Henry Liss.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1986 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Any way you look at it, the opening of Franz Kline's first solo show at the Sidney Janis Gallery in New York in March 1956 was a major event. Kline was hot. His imposing black-and-white canvases were hot. Abstract expressionism was hot. And New York was seedbed and hothouse for all. It was appropriate, then, that Kline's mother, Anne, should venture forth from her large Victorian house on Ninth Street in Lehighton, Pa., to take in...
NEWS
September 25, 1986 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
The bold, black and white oil, painted in 1921 by abstract expressionist Franz Kline, demanded their attention. Three feet high and 19 strong, the pre-first graders studied the canvas. "Do you think he listened to music when he painted this?" asked their guide, Shirlene Coyne. Collin Fisher, 6, shot his arm into the air. He had the answer. "No!" he told Coyne. "They didn't have music then. " The parent chaperones, teacher Bonnie Kauffman, and Coyne all chuckled, then led the group to another painting as they introduced the youngsters to Kline's acclaimed works.
NEWS
July 4, 1987 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
William Baziotes believed a painter had to keep in touch with his roots, and he did so by making an annual trek from his Manhattan studio to his family home in Reading. What better way to honor the late painter, the most famous artist Reading has produced, on what would have been his 75th birthday than with a home-town exhibition of his paintings? The show in the Freedman Gallery of Albright College shows Baziotes' work to be full of contradictions. Enormously introspective and publicity-shy, he nonetheless was the first among leaders of the abstract expressionist movement to gain public recognition in the late 1940s.
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NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
During the glory years of the New York School, Franz Kline developed an abstract painting language that was so distinctive it's immediately identifiable, and so strongly linked to him that no other artist could dare imitate it. Just as Jackson Pollock is known for drips and loops of colored pigment, Kline constructed his pictures with bold, intersecting black bars and curves on a white ground. His 1960 oil Turin , part of a revealing Kline exhibition at the Allentown Art Museum, is quintessential.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
After more than three hours of testimony, a preliminary hearing has been continued until October for a Philadelphia man accused of selling forged paintings to an Abington physician. Stanley Strauss, 47, of the 7700 block of Bradford Street, is accused of selling five forged paintings said to be by American artist Franz Kline to Arthur Weiss of Abington for $9,500. A second hearing to determine whether Strauss should be held for trial is scheduled for Oct. 2. Strauss was arrested in March after an investigation that began last July, when Weiss went to police questioning the authenticity of the paintings.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia man who claimed he was a close friend of the late American artist Franz Kline has been charged with selling four forged works of the painter to an Abington doctor for $9,500. The doctor told police he became suspicious of Stanley Strauss, who advertised himself as a dealer in authenticated art, when he later read a newspaper account of a $2.75 million sale of a Kline painting. Strauss, 47, of the 7700 block of Bradford Street, was arraigned yesterday before Abington District Justice Henry Liss.
NEWS
January 28, 1990 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ah, to be doubly gifted. It wasn't enough that James A. Michener was a world-acclaimed author. He wanted to paint, too. Michener started painting 20 years ago as a "philosophical exploration," the author of Centennial and dozens of other voluminous books said in a telephone interview from his home in Austin, Texas, where he teaches at the University of Texas. "I work in the arts and I love the arts. I collect paintings and I wanted to see what the artists were doing, what you can do with the different mediums.
NEWS
December 24, 1989 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
Malvern sculptor Bill Freeland is hitting his stride. He currently has a one-man show at New York's Dolan/Maxwell Gallery, which is publishing a substantial catalogue on his work for the occasion. He also recently won a prestigious Pollock-Krasner Foundation fellowship that will give him, he says, a "clearer track" than he's had for some time. "Now that I've turned 60," says Freeland, "I'm in a bit of a hurry about it all. " His work is abstract, yet it mirrors vital concerns about ecology, the environment, loss of agrarian values and a diminished work ethic.
NEWS
July 4, 1987 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
William Baziotes believed a painter had to keep in touch with his roots, and he did so by making an annual trek from his Manhattan studio to his family home in Reading. What better way to honor the late painter, the most famous artist Reading has produced, on what would have been his 75th birthday than with a home-town exhibition of his paintings? The show in the Freedman Gallery of Albright College shows Baziotes' work to be full of contradictions. Enormously introspective and publicity-shy, he nonetheless was the first among leaders of the abstract expressionist movement to gain public recognition in the late 1940s.
NEWS
October 21, 1986 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Old-time sports fans remember the days when the poetry and drama of the game were sufficient to attract an audience. But sports are no longer just games - they're prime-time mass entertainment that has to be professionally marketed to cover its production costs. Looking at art museums in the 1980s, one could draw a comparison with professional sports. The poetry, drama and beauty of art were never enough to pack galleries day in and day out. But years ago, museums didn't particularly care whether they had lines around the block.
NEWS
September 25, 1986 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
The bold, black and white oil, painted in 1921 by abstract expressionist Franz Kline, demanded their attention. Three feet high and 19 strong, the pre-first graders studied the canvas. "Do you think he listened to music when he painted this?" asked their guide, Shirlene Coyne. Collin Fisher, 6, shot his arm into the air. He had the answer. "No!" he told Coyne. "They didn't have music then. " The parent chaperones, teacher Bonnie Kauffman, and Coyne all chuckled, then led the group to another painting as they introduced the youngsters to Kline's acclaimed works.
NEWS
September 18, 1986 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
"My mind went zoom," says dancer and choreographer Trina A. Collins, describing her reaction to the Franz Kline exhibit at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. "I'd seen his paintings before, but seeing them all together was different. " As a result of that mind-zap - or zoom - Collins and members of her dance troupe, Danceteller, will perform Homage, a dance inspired by the Kline paintings, at the academy Saturday and Sunday at 4 p.m. "The Nijinsky painting and the still lifes are wonderful," Collins explains, "but they don't make me want to dance.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1986 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Franz Kline started pushing his art into uncharted regions of abstraction back in the late 1940s, he was caught up in the excitement of the trek, the giddy exploration of undiscovered territory. Paint was a vehicle, not an end in itself. It carried him where he wanted to go from canvas to canvas, and there was no time to worry about where the paint came from or what it was made from or how long it would last after he used it. But there was a problem: Paint was dear, and Kline was broke.
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