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NEWS
July 8, 2000 | by Theresa Conroy and Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writers
The Greeks have arrived. If everything goes as planned, you'll hardly notice them - except, of course if you're detoured by street closings, caught in a traffic jam or catch sight of the expected 100,000 people enjoying the sunshine on Belmont Plateau. This year's Greek Picnic, which begins at noon today, has been billed as a kinder, gentler affair. In an effort to keep the "non-Greek" picnickers - the hooligans of previous years - from going nuts on South Street, organizers have toned down the event.
NEWS
July 21, 1999 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
With Greek-lettered picnic events already under way, Mayor Rendell and Police Commissioner John Timoney have some advice to those looking forward to the big parties this coming weekend: behave. "We're anticipating very little trouble," Rendell said in a City Hall news conference, "but we'll be there in adequate numbers, and if any Philadelphians think this is a big party where they can come down and make trouble, they should know they'll be met with swift deterrence. " Rendell and Timoney were joined by picnic organizers yesterday to outline plans aimed at minimizing the rough stuff that occurred over the fraternities and sororities picnic weekend last year.
NEWS
February 20, 2013 | By Genaro C. Armas, Associated Press
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - Nearly three dozen downtown bars, restaurants, and bottle shops have agreed to halt alcohol sales to counter an early St. Patrick's Day celebration created by Pennsylvania State University students, the most aggressive effort yet to curb drinking for the unofficial "State Patty's Day" holiday. In exchange, each business will receive a $5,000 subsidy to help account for lost revenue. State Patty's Day was created in 2007 to celebrate St. Patrick's Day when it fell during spring break that year.
NEWS
July 16, 2001 | By Jack Hagel INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Denise Copeland has a lot of leftover bread. The manager of Alilyh's Park a la Carte, a snack bar at Belmont Plateau in Fairmount Park, expected to sell more sandwiches, hamburgers and hot dogs at Saturday's Greek Picnic. But the usual large crowds that attend the annual gathering of black fraternities and sororities did not materialize. Instead of the 125,000 to 200,000 people that were expected, the event drew less than 10,000. And that meant Copeland's biggest day of the year was a bust.
NEWS
July 13, 2007 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 33d annual Philadelphia Greek Picnic slipped into town almost unnoticed this week. The nine-day event - an annual gathering of current and former college students who are part of black Greek-letter fraternities and sororities - culminates tomorrow with a barbecue contest, cookout, and concerts in Fairmount Park's Belmont Grove. Last night, several hundred Greeks got a jump on the festivities at University City High School, where the Pan-Hellenic Council presented its third annual Stop the Violence Urban Dance Competition.
NEWS
June 11, 1999 | by Peter Liacouras
Isn't it nice that we can still stir up passions over ownership of a name? The latest example concerns the "Greek Picnic" sponsored by the "National Pan-Hellenic Council" of college fraternities and sororities. Greek-American ("Hellenic-American") ethnic, religious and social organizations object to use of "Greek" in describing this annual picnic comprised predominantly of African-Americans. Instead of thanking fraternities and sororities for such recognition, some of my Greek friends are threatening lawsuits because they don't want to be confused by the public with those "other" Greeks, even though Isocrates 2,400 years ago proudly welcomed everyone to share in the name "Hellene.
NEWS
August 1, 1995 | by Yvette Ousley, Daily News Staff Writer
Organizers of the Greek Picnic must hire professionals next year to manage the event if they are to avoid problems with planning, fund-raising and advertising. That's the official word from black business leaders amid reports and complaints of trouble coordinating hotel rooms, event sponsors and entertainment for Greek Picnic '95. "It's such a large event that management and coordination must go to another level," said Romona Riscoe, executive director of the Multicultural Affairs Congress, which tries to persuade black groups to meet in Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 13, 1988 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Throngs of West Chester University students delivered the restaurant-size, one-gallon ketchup or mayonnaise jars, now scrubbed clean for pennies, to area merchants' counters. The coins they collect will buy Christmas gifts for the children of Lower Merion police Officer Edward Setzer, who was killed Sept. 30 while thwarting a robbery. Theirs is the latest in a series of community service projects undertaken by university Greeks, who are working to change their image as hard-drinking organizations with nothing more pressing than planning their next party.
NEWS
July 13, 1998 | by Rob Nelson and Mister Mann Frisby, Daily News Staff Writers
They gathered in a haze of barbecue smoke and jumped to the rhythms of rap - milling throngs of young adults, crowded by the thousands under a bright sun in the park. Many were moving, dancing style-statements, flaunting their verve and flair. Others enjoyed quieter moments Saturday afternoon, reunited with friends for conversation and food. It was the 24th annual Greek Picnic in Fairmount Park and it was a chance for young collegians to show off, to schmooze, to groove and generally to have a good time, united by their college experiences, by their memberships in fraternities and sororities - and by their blackness.
NEWS
July 21, 1998 | By Acel Moore
The Greek picnic, held two weekends ago in Fairmount Park, drew nearly a quarter million African American college students - members of Greek-lettered fraternities and sororities - in what is considered the largest gathering of young blacks in the nation. The event also attracted an untold number of young people who were neither members of fraternities or sororities nor even college students. Amid all the publicity, there has been too much emphasis, particularly on television, on the rowdiness at the picnic, including complaints from women that they were groped or stripped in Fairmount Park or on city streets after the events.
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NEWS
April 8, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rutgers University is reining in Greek life at its largest campus in reaction to several alcohol-related incidents that have brought criticism and scrutiny to the school. The university last week banned house parties at the 86 officially recognized fraternities and sororities on its New Brunswick campus for the rest of the year - a moratorium intended to ensure "the health and safety of our students," a spokesman said. "Rutgers takes seriously its commitment to maintaining a healthy and safe campus environment," E.J. Miranda said Monday in a statement.
NEWS
February 20, 2013 | By Genaro C. Armas, Associated Press
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - Nearly three dozen downtown bars, restaurants, and bottle shops have agreed to halt alcohol sales to counter an early St. Patrick's Day celebration created by Pennsylvania State University students, the most aggressive effort yet to curb drinking for the unofficial "State Patty's Day" holiday. In exchange, each business will receive a $5,000 subsidy to help account for lost revenue. State Patty's Day was created in 2007 to celebrate St. Patrick's Day when it fell during spring break that year.
NEWS
July 13, 2007 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 33d annual Philadelphia Greek Picnic slipped into town almost unnoticed this week. The nine-day event - an annual gathering of current and former college students who are part of black Greek-letter fraternities and sororities - culminates tomorrow with a barbecue contest, cookout, and concerts in Fairmount Park's Belmont Grove. Last night, several hundred Greeks got a jump on the festivities at University City High School, where the Pan-Hellenic Council presented its third annual Stop the Violence Urban Dance Competition.
NEWS
July 12, 2002 | By Anita Fleming-Rife INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's reunion time and everyone is welcome to Belmont Plateau - well, not everyone. Greek Picnic organizers are appealing to Greek-letter collegians, alumni, and others to plan on a good time from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. tomorrow in Fairmount Park. But limiting the number of "others" who turn out has plagued the Philadelphia Alumni Chapter of the National Pan-Hellenic Council for several years. The council, in recent years, had attempted to limit uninvited guests by using Greek-letter organizations' Web sites to advertise events.
NEWS
July 16, 2001 | By Jack Hagel INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Denise Copeland has a lot of leftover bread. The manager of Alilyh's Park a la Carte, a snack bar at Belmont Plateau in Fairmount Park, expected to sell more sandwiches, hamburgers and hot dogs at Saturday's Greek Picnic. But the usual large crowds that attend the annual gathering of black fraternities and sororities did not materialize. Instead of the 125,000 to 200,000 people that were expected, the event drew less than 10,000. And that meant Copeland's biggest day of the year was a bust.
NEWS
July 8, 2000 | by Theresa Conroy and Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writers
The Greeks have arrived. If everything goes as planned, you'll hardly notice them - except, of course if you're detoured by street closings, caught in a traffic jam or catch sight of the expected 100,000 people enjoying the sunshine on Belmont Plateau. This year's Greek Picnic, which begins at noon today, has been billed as a kinder, gentler affair. In an effort to keep the "non-Greek" picnickers - the hooligans of previous years - from going nuts on South Street, organizers have toned down the event.
NEWS
July 21, 1999 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
With Greek-lettered picnic events already under way, Mayor Rendell and Police Commissioner John Timoney have some advice to those looking forward to the big parties this coming weekend: behave. "We're anticipating very little trouble," Rendell said in a City Hall news conference, "but we'll be there in adequate numbers, and if any Philadelphians think this is a big party where they can come down and make trouble, they should know they'll be met with swift deterrence. " Rendell and Timoney were joined by picnic organizers yesterday to outline plans aimed at minimizing the rough stuff that occurred over the fraternities and sororities picnic weekend last year.
NEWS
June 11, 1999 | by Peter Liacouras
Isn't it nice that we can still stir up passions over ownership of a name? The latest example concerns the "Greek Picnic" sponsored by the "National Pan-Hellenic Council" of college fraternities and sororities. Greek-American ("Hellenic-American") ethnic, religious and social organizations object to use of "Greek" in describing this annual picnic comprised predominantly of African-Americans. Instead of thanking fraternities and sororities for such recognition, some of my Greek friends are threatening lawsuits because they don't want to be confused by the public with those "other" Greeks, even though Isocrates 2,400 years ago proudly welcomed everyone to share in the name "Hellene.
NEWS
July 21, 1998 | By Acel Moore
The Greek picnic, held two weekends ago in Fairmount Park, drew nearly a quarter million African American college students - members of Greek-lettered fraternities and sororities - in what is considered the largest gathering of young blacks in the nation. The event also attracted an untold number of young people who were neither members of fraternities or sororities nor even college students. Amid all the publicity, there has been too much emphasis, particularly on television, on the rowdiness at the picnic, including complaints from women that they were groped or stripped in Fairmount Park or on city streets after the events.
NEWS
July 13, 1998 | by Rob Nelson and Mister Mann Frisby, Daily News Staff Writers
They gathered in a haze of barbecue smoke and jumped to the rhythms of rap - milling throngs of young adults, crowded by the thousands under a bright sun in the park. Many were moving, dancing style-statements, flaunting their verve and flair. Others enjoyed quieter moments Saturday afternoon, reunited with friends for conversation and food. It was the 24th annual Greek Picnic in Fairmount Park and it was a chance for young collegians to show off, to schmooze, to groove and generally to have a good time, united by their college experiences, by their memberships in fraternities and sororities - and by their blackness.
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