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IN THE NEWS

Fred Shero

SPORTS
April 17, 1990 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he arrived here in 1969, a wide-eyed second-round draft pick from Western Canada, he wasn't even sure he would last through a Flyers training camp. But Bobby Clarke not only made the Flyers, he made them champions. Clarke's indomitable spirit and drive guided a youthful franchise to two Stanley Cups in the mid-1970s, in the process turning him into one of Philadelphia's sports legends. A city unfamiliar with hockey soon grew to admire the fierce passion with which Clarke and the Flyers played.
NEWS
August 23, 1987 | By Marc Narducci, Special to The Inquirer
The careers of the Philadelphia Flyers who played during the Stanley Cup years of 1974 and 1975 are over, but the applause has not faded, and the players' desire to help others has not subsided. Those Flyers of the glory years remain active in the community, as evidenced by their fund-raising efforts in area benefit softball games. It is difficult to discern who gets more pleasure from the charitable events, the former Flyers or the beneficiaries. "We started playing these benefits in the early 70s when Fred Shero was coaching us," said former Flyers goalie and current broadcaster Bob Taylor, who resides in Medford.
SPORTS
October 8, 2008 | By Sam Carchidi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Win today and we'll walk together forever. " - Written on a blackboard by Flyers coach Fred Shero before the 1974 Stanley Cup final. They walked together onto the Spectrum ice - site of their dramatic Stanley Cup championship 34 years ago - for one last time last night. Bernie, Clarkie and Moose. Big Bird, Hound and Hammer. Dorny, Reggie the Rifle and Little "O. " And many, many others. This was the house where a blue-collar, pugnacious group of shaggy-haired players - the Broad Street Bullies, the Bulletin's Jack Chevalier labeled them - triggered parades that drew more than 2 million people in 1974 and again in 1975 after they won Cups and became a part of the city's sports lore.
SPORTS
November 13, 2013 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
TORONTO - Ray Shero, accepting the Hall of Fame honor Monday night on behalf of his father, the late Fred Shero, recited the famous words the Flyers coach scribbled on the blackboard during the 1974 Stanley Cup Finals against the Boston Bruins: "Win today and we walk together forever. " "Thirty-nine years later, it's safe to say that not only has that team not broken a bond to this day, but the city of Philadelphia still has a love affair with a bunch of feisty Canadian kids," said Shero, now the highly respected Pittsburgh Penguins general manager.
SPORTS
May 16, 2010 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
The other day, as the Flyers were preparing to leave for their epic Game 7 in Boston, the subject of Fred Shero's legendary blackboard scrawl, "Win today and we walk together forever," came up. Peter Laviolette, trying to become the first Flyers coach since Shero to hoist the Stanley Cup, smiled slyly. This was a big game, but a little perspective was in order. "Win tonight and we're halfway there," he said. "I really don't think that's going to get them going. " In a way, what the Flyers did against the Bruins was more remarkable than winning a championship.
SPORTS
June 9, 2010
DON'T FRET about those "Broad Street Bullies," that rowdy gang of Flyers who won it all, back-to-back. They will continue to walk together forever, because the mystical coach promised them that. And because they are beloved for who they were and what they accomplished. If the current Flyers rally to win the Stanley Cup, they will walk right alongside them for who they are and the way they spit in the eye of adversity. Just don't ask the current bunch to brawl their way to a championship.
SPORTS
April 18, 2014 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
JAKE VORACEK was not shy. Thinking back to the Flyers' 3-1 loss to the Rangers at Madison Square Garden on March 26, Voracek said New York defenseman Ryan McDonagh "owned" his line. "We were overthinking it too much against him," Voracek said. "He's a very smart defenseman; he reads the ice very well. He's so good at picking off passes. " With Ray Emery filling in for the injured Steve Mason in Game 1, and even less room for error, McDonagh's stout work at the blue line has forced Flyers coach Craig Berube to alter his game plan.
SPORTS
November 26, 2014 | BY JAKE KAPLAN, Daily News Staff Writer kaplanj@phillynews.com
UNIONDALE, N.Y. - Pat Quinn, according to Flyers president Paul Holmgren, was someone whom those in sports like to call "a player's coach. " "I think most of us would've done whatever he asked us to do," Holmgren, who played for the team in each of Quinn's 4 years as head coach, said yesterday by phone. "Run through that wall? Sure. How many bricks do you want left over? We would've done anything for him. " Holmgren, a member of the 1979-80 club that "The Big Irishman" led to a 35-game unbeaten streak and a trip to the Stanley Cup finals, is among many in the hockey world mourning the loss of Quinn, who died Sunday night in Vancouver after a lengthy illness.
SPORTS
February 13, 2012 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
DETROIT - The Flyers tried to protect a special segment in the franchise's history Sunday night. But despite the first two-goal game of Brayden Schenn's young career, it didn't happen. The Detroit Red Wings tied an NHL record with their 20th consecutive home win, 4-3, at the reverberating Joe Louis Arena. They equaled the record shared by the 1975-76 Flyers and 1929-30 Boston Bruins. Johan Franzen snapped a 3-3 tie just 52 seconds into the third period, taking a touch pass from Nicklas Lidstrom in front and tapping it past Sergei Bobrovsky.
NEWS
November 4, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
AS A PROGNOSTICATOR, Chuck Newman made a great sportswriter. The occasion was the dramatic run-up to the Flyers' stunning first Stanley Cup win in 1974. Chuck had confidently picked the New York Rangers in the semifinals and the Boston Bruins for the Cup. The Flyers beat the Rangers in seven games and then the Bruins, despite the presence of the immortal Bobby Orr, in six to take the Cup. "Even the bookies won't handle my action anymore," Chuck wrote in his column in the Inquirer.
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