CollectionsFrederica Massiah Jackson
IN THE NEWS

Frederica Massiah Jackson

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 24, 1998 | ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer staff writer Michael Matza contributed to this article
President Clinton nominated an Easton judge yesterday to the federal bench in Philadelphia, a month after his previous choice dropped out amid complaints about her past rulings. Robert A. Freedberg has served on Northampton County's Court of Common Pleas since 1980 and is now the court's head judge. Clinton's last nominee to the U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, Frederica Massiah-Jackson, had been criticized as being too lenient toward criminals while serving as a Philadelphia judge.
NEWS
February 12, 1998 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Inquirer staff writer Michael Matza contributed to this article
After a day of intense behind-the-scenes bargaining, Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott yesterday sent the troubled judicial nomination of Frederica Massiah-Jackson back to the Judiciary Committee. Lott said his sole purpose in doing so was to allow the committee to hold a second hearing on Massiah-Jackson's bid to sit on the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. The hearing, to be held in the next several weeks, would give her an opportunity to respond to charges by Pennsylvania law enforcement officials that, during her years as a criminal trial judge in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court, she favored criminals over police and prosecutors.
NEWS
February 19, 1998 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Until last month, Frederica Massiah-Jackson, a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court judge, appeared on her way to becoming the first African American woman to sit on the U.S. District Court in Philadelphia. No prosecutor or law enforcement official in the state had publicly opposed her ascension. Then, on Jan. 6, John Morganelli, the district attorney of Northampton County, took a ride to Harrisburg. Morganelli, of Bethlehem, held a one-man news conference in the Capitol Rotunda.
NEWS
January 9, 1998 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The executive committee of the Pennsylvania District Attorneys Association voted yesterday to oppose the confirmation of Philadelphia judge Frederica A. Massiah-Jackson. Philadelphia District Attorney Lynne Abraham participated in the telephone conference call and supported the unanimous vote, said Northampton County District Attorney John Morganelli, who on Tuesday announced an effort to generate opposition to Massiah-Jackson's nomination. The executive committee has fewer than a dozen members.
NEWS
January 26, 1998
Now the full Senate's vote on Frederica Massiah-Jackson's nomination to U.S. District Court has been delayed. District Attorney Lynne Abraham is key in a campaign against her. Abraham has trashed Massiah-Jackson as if she let ax murderers go free, writing that her "judicial service is replete with instances of demonstrated leniency towards criminals, an adversarial attitude towards police, and disrespect and a hostile attitude towards prosecutors....
NEWS
January 15, 1998 | By Acel Moore
The headlines and the news stories tell only one aspect of the life and background of Common Pleas Court Judge Frederica Massiah-Jackson. Her nomination to the federal bench is under attack by political ideologues in the U.S. Senate and law-and-order prosecutors, led by Philadelphia District Attorney Lynne Abraham. Abraham's criticism of Massiah-Jackson implies that the judge has not been friendly to police or prosecutors, lacks proper judicial temperament, and is soft on criminals.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert Nils Herdelin , old-time LaSalle Explorers basketball star turned real estate investor and sometime Upper Darby barkeep, is happy about the bargain-basement prices fetched by Philadelphia's oversupply of fancy real estate these days. "This has just incredible views," he told me in the lobby of the 21-story south tower at Waterfront Square, across Columbus Boulevard from the miniature Yards brewery and a couple of shuttered nightclubs. The tower is just south of the SugarHouse gambling hall, whose asphalt lots were jammed with noontime gamblers as I walked over from SEPTA's Spring Garden Street El stop.
NEWS
February 14, 1998 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
District Attorney Lynne Abraham's contention that Frederica Massiah-Jackson isn't qualified to be a federal judge was vigorously challenged yesterday by the Philadelphia Bar Association. The bar association contended that there was no evidence to support the DA's charge that Massiah-Jackson, a Common Pleas judge, is lenient to criminals and hostile to law enforcement officials and crime victims. On Monday, the DA's office released its analyses of about 50 cases heard by Massiah-Jackson, saying the record showed her "disturbing willingness" to show leniency.
NEWS
November 7, 2003
WE HATE to be the ones to break this news, but the sad truth is that as of 4 p.m. today, Fairmount Park does not belong to the people of Philadelphia. Even though you pay for it through your tax dollars, and you might get to enjoy a few picnics on the grass - and even though last year a new day had dawned for the parks when the process of choosing new park commissioners went public - the Philadelphia Board of Judges of Common Pleas Court, which appoints the Fairmount Park Commission, would rather you mind your own business.
NEWS
January 16, 1998
National holidays aren't reserved for whites Rashidah Rahman Abdullah (letter, Jan. 12) states that we whites have "[our] own holidays," listing Presidents Day, St. Patrick's Day and Columbus Day. St. Patrick's Day is indeed an ethnic holiday, but not all white people are Irish. President's Day and Columbus Day are national holidays celebrating steps it took to found this country - the same country African-Americans live in. I do not dispute African-American holidays but others are not "white holidays" - they are American holidays that African-Americans celebrate too. Although Bob Day (letter, Dec. 31)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert Nils Herdelin , old-time LaSalle Explorers basketball star turned real estate investor and sometime Upper Darby barkeep, is happy about the bargain-basement prices fetched by Philadelphia's oversupply of fancy real estate these days. "This has just incredible views," he told me in the lobby of the 21-story south tower at Waterfront Square, across Columbus Boulevard from the miniature Yards brewery and a couple of shuttered nightclubs. The tower is just south of the SugarHouse gambling hall, whose asphalt lots were jammed with noontime gamblers as I walked over from SEPTA's Spring Garden Street El stop.
NEWS
November 7, 2003
WE HATE to be the ones to break this news, but the sad truth is that as of 4 p.m. today, Fairmount Park does not belong to the people of Philadelphia. Even though you pay for it through your tax dollars, and you might get to enjoy a few picnics on the grass - and even though last year a new day had dawned for the parks when the process of choosing new park commissioners went public - the Philadelphia Board of Judges of Common Pleas Court, which appoints the Fairmount Park Commission, would rather you mind your own business.
NEWS
May 12, 2001 | By Nathan Gorenstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham was endorsed yesterday by the Philadelphia Tribune, a move the African American newspaper's editorial called "an emotionally difficult choice. " Abraham said the endorsement marked a "turning point" for her reelection campaign, while Alex Talmadge Jr., her challenger in Tuesday's Democratic primary, said few Philadelphians would be swayed by the newspaper. The Tribune endorsement came in the final days of a campaign that has been almost entirely about race - specifically, whether Abraham has been unfairly aggressive in prosecuting African Americans and insensitive to black concerns.
NEWS
May 11, 2001 | By Tom Infield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An aide to U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter has challenged District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham's recollections of her controversial role in sinking the appointment of a black woman to the federal bench in Philadelphia. The way that Abraham intervened in the nomination of Frederica Massiah-Jackson - speaking out against the judge only after winning reelection in 1997 - led to charges of racism that continue to dog her almost four years later. David Urban, Specter's chief of staff, said he was "surprised to learn" of recent statements by the district attorney "that Sen. Specter was responsible for the late timing of her input.
NEWS
May 4, 2001
To be Philadelphia's district attorney, you need to be, at a minimum, a resident of the city for two years, and, according to state rules, "learned in the law. " But to be an effective district attorney, we all know you need much more than those easy requirements. You need deep experience in the legal system, a keen understanding of crime, and an even keener appreciation of your community. And with those requirements as the benchmark, it's clear that in the race between Lynne Abraham and Alexander Talmadge, Abraham is the clear choice for district attorney.
NEWS
March 27, 2001 | By Acel Moore
In the Democratic Party primary contest for district attorney of Philadelphia, the question of race has been raised by Alexander Z. Talmadge Jr., an African American and the challenger to 10-year incumbent Lynne Abraham. Talmadge has an uphill battle to unseat Abraham, who has the backing not only of the city's Democratic Party but also of Mayor Street. So why run against an incumbent? Because, as Talmadge surely knows, Abraham is unpopular with much of the African American community.
NEWS
January 31, 2001 | by Chris Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
District Attorney Lynne Abraham will announce her re-election bid today, in the face of strong opposition from some African-American leaders who have their own candidate in mind. The "draft committee" hoping to pull City Commissioner Alexander Talmadge Jr., 41, into the race yesterday praised Talmadge and railed against Abraham, who turns 60 today. Talmadge, however, continues to say he is not a candidate. The Democrat, now in his third term, would have to resign his $80,000-a-year City Commission seat if he took on Abraham.
NEWS
January 4, 2001 | By Robert Gray
For too long, the Philadelphia district attorney's office has been ruled by the "Queen of Capital Punishment. " DA Lynne Abraham has routinely sought the death penalty since her first election in 1991. Most defendants in capital trials are poor and rely on court-appointed defense lawyers. So while sending those convicted of murder to death, there is virtually no working system for representing the poorest. Private attorneys charge an estimated $50,000 in a murder trial. Philadelphia pays court-appointed lawyers $1,700 for preparation and $400 for each day in court.
NEWS
December 13, 2000 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia Democratic leaders laid down their version of the law to a group of judges yesterday, telling them not to expect party support at the polls if they fail to vote tomorrow for Frederica Massiah-Jackson as president judge of Common Pleas Court. The city's 69 Democratic ward leaders, after a breakfast meeting with Mayor Street at a hotel on Monday, decided to back Massiah-Jackson over several other judges seeking the top spot on the 86-member court. Yesterday, U.S. Rep. Robert A. Brady and several other party officials met for lunch at party headquarters with most of the 18 judges of Common Pleas Court who are coming up for retention election next November.
NEWS
October 18, 2000 | by Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
A contest involving at least four candidates for the presidency of the city's Common Pleas Court is developing, and Frederica Massiah-Jackson is at the center of it. Massiah-Jackson, 49, is the controversial jurist whom President Clinton nominated to be the first female African-American federal judge here. She withdrew her nomination in March 1998 after critics, led by District Attorney Lynne Abraham, campaigned against her appointment for allegedly being too lenient toward criminals.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|