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Frederick Douglass

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1995 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Handsome and imposing, eyes burning with conviction, Frederick Douglass must have made a singular first impression on his contemporaries - an impression only magnified by the splendor of his oratory. In the 1840s, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, feminist and fellow abolitionist, described him as resembling an African prince, "majestic in his wrath" at the injustice of slavery. She wondered, she said, "that any mortal man should have ever tried to subjugate a being with such talents. " Douglass (1818-1895)
NEWS
July 29, 2008
AROUND THIS time of the celebratory season, as a form of political ritual, I read aloud Frederick Douglass' 1852 presentation, "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?" Douglass was invited by the Ladies' Anti-Slavery Society of Rochester, N.Y., and he went on to chide the institution of slavery by pointing out its "deception" and "hollow mockery. " One hundred and fifty six years later, and somewhat congruent with Douglass' message in 1852, Michelle Obama, at a campaign rally in Milwaukee on Feb. 19, said that, "for the first time" in her adult life, she was "proud of America," as she spoke to support her husband's presidential bid. Then, on July Fourth, I was pleasantly shocked at Mayor Nutter's presentation at Independence Hall for Sunoco Welcome America!
NEWS
February 10, 1991 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
The long road Frederick Douglass traveled from slave to free man, abolitionist and eloquent orator will be illuminated during a one-act play performed at West Chester's First Presbyterian Church by actor James Roberts. The performance Feb. 20 is sponsored by the Chester County Historical Society. "The play is presented as the society's tribute to African-American History Month," said Beverly Sheppard of the society's public relations department. Roberts, who lives in Chestnut Hill, wrote the play Frederick Douglass as a tribute to the man who fled from slavery in 1838.
NEWS
February 13, 1992 | By Pheralyn Dove, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
"And before I'll be a slave, I'll be buried in my grave. . . . " The message of this traditional spiritual took on special significance for Frederick Douglass, who in 1840 escaped the atrocities of slavery to become one of America's great historical figures as an abolitionist, writer, speaker, activist and champion of the rights of slaves, former slaves and women. His triumphant story will be reconstructed tonight at Ursinus College in Collegeville, when stage, film and television actor Roger Guenveur Smith is featured in the one-man show Frederick Douglass Now. This is not a staid period piece.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | By ACEL MOORE
Emory R. Burrell is a man whom I have known since the early '70s when I was a reporter. I can't remember the exact occasion when I first met him. Maybe it was at a crime scene or some other activity to which a police reporter must respond. Over the years, we developed a friendship. But, through a mutual friend, Emory and I got to know each other better since his retirement in 1983. From the day I met him, Emory, who is 52, impressed me as a self-confident, gregarious man, always with a positive attitude.
NEWS
September 10, 1992 | By ACEL MOORE
I've long assumed that the historical knowledge of the average high school senior is so limited that events dating back a century are as ancient as those that happened a millennium ago. This bias shaped my assumption Tuesday when I attended a University of Pennsylvania reading project for incoming freshmen. The effort was initiated last year by Penn's faculty in order to provide a shared intellectual experience for new students during their orientation week. My assumption was reinforced upon learning that the text for discussion this year was: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave.
NEWS
July 4, 2010
1. h. Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1942. 2. e. William Tecumseh Sherman, 1866. 3. b. Frederick Douglass, July 5, 1852. 4. j. George W. Bush, 2002. 5. a. Barack Obama, 2009. 6. c. Abraham Lincoln, July 7, 1863. 7. d. Bill Clinton, 1996. 8. g. Galusha A. Grow, 1877. 9. f. James Wilson, 1788. 10. i. Ronald Reagan, 1981.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
Eighty-seven years ago - when black Americans were still terrorized by lynching - black historian Carter G. Woodson had a simple but powerful idea: Designate a week to celebrate the contributions that black Americans had made to their country. Woodson chose the second week of February to commemorate the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. Negro History Week, as it was known, was an important development for its time. Back then, official history barely acknowledged the presence of black Americans, while popular culture actively diminished their humanity.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1994 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
PBS and Fox present special broadcasts tonight for viewers who can tear themselves away from Roseanne. One serious, one frivolous, each represents its network well. Party of Five, a series that's hitting its stride, gets a chance at the 9 p.m. slot after Beverly Hills, 90210 on Channel 29, and Channel 12 weighs in at 9 with a PBS biography of Frederick Douglass. Frederick Douglass: When the Lion Wrote History presents itself as "the first comprehensive documentary" on the man who was born a slave and ended life as an adviser to presidents.
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NEWS
February 21, 2013
Eighty-seven years ago - when black Americans were still terrorized by lynching - black historian Carter G. Woodson had a simple but powerful idea: Designate a week to celebrate the contributions that black Americans had made to their country. Woodson chose the second week of February to commemorate the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. Negro History Week, as it was known, was an important development for its time. Back then, official history barely acknowledged the presence of black Americans, while popular culture actively diminished their humanity.
NEWS
January 6, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the first day of 1863, as the Civil War raged on, President Lincoln proclaimed all the slaves in the rebellious Confederate states to be "forever free. " With his Emancipation Proclamation, whose 150th anniversary the United States celebrates this week, Lincoln made the end of slavery a Civil War goal. As PBS's ambitious documentary miniseries The Abolitionists shows, Lincoln's words came at the end of a decadeslong antislavery campaign led by a tiny group of activists whose fervor alienated them from the mainstream of American life.
NEWS
June 7, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
Frederick Douglass Hunter was one of the most popular people on the University of Pennsylvania campus. He fed the students and faculty. As the chef in Penn's dining service, his job was to keep the students and teachers who patronized the school's cafeteria well-fed and happy. And he succeeded beyond their expectations. After all, it was a cafeteria, and cafeterias are not known for gourmet dining. But Frederick Hunter had a flair and a true love of cooking. He provided students with the nutrition they needed to cope with demanding professors — whom he also fed — and with tough exams and the other stresses of college life.
NEWS
May 10, 2012 | By Michael D. Schaffer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Martin R. Delany is one of the most interesting people you've never heard of. He was, over the course of a long life (1812-85), a writer, editor, abolitionist, Harvard medical student, physician, judge, acquaintance of John Brown, and the first African American commissioned a major in the Army. He is also widely considered America's first black nationalist, the forerunner of Marcus Garvey, Paul Robeson, and Malcolm X. But unless you're a close student of African American history or 19th-century American literature, chances are very good that you don't know much about Delany, who stands in the long shadow cast by Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, and W.E.B.
TRAVEL
February 12, 2012 | By Bob Salsberg, Associated Press
BOSTON - Step into the sanctuary of the African Meeting House and you will walk on the same floorboards where Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, and other prominent abolitionists railed against slavery in the 19th century, and where free black men gathered to shape the famed 54th Massachusetts Regiment to fight in the Civil War. Following a painstaking $9 million restoration, the nation's oldest black church building reopened in December....
NEWS
February 9, 2012 | By Marc Lamont Hill, Daily News Columnist
IT'S BLACK History Month, a celebration that began in 1926 as "Negro History Week" and has morphed into a widely recognized and celebrated part of American culture. As a result, schools all around Philadelphia, and in most parts of the country not named Arizona, will pay particular attention to the lives, triumphs and contributions of black people in America. Of course, many people remain infuriated by the idea of Black History Month. "Why isn't there a White History Month?" they often ask me. My answer?
NEWS
July 20, 2011
By Grant Calder The recently released findings of the 2010 National Assessment of Educational Progress provided another opportunity for the usual hand-wringing about how little American kids know about American history these days. An Inquirer article reported that only 13 percent of the high school seniors who took the test "showed a solid grasp of the subject. " Sounds dismal. But before we give up on this generation, we should ask ourselves a few questions. First, what constitutes "a solid grasp of the subject"?
NEWS
July 4, 2010
1. h. Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1942. 2. e. William Tecumseh Sherman, 1866. 3. b. Frederick Douglass, July 5, 1852. 4. j. George W. Bush, 2002. 5. a. Barack Obama, 2009. 6. c. Abraham Lincoln, July 7, 1863. 7. d. Bill Clinton, 1996. 8. g. Galusha A. Grow, 1877. 9. f. James Wilson, 1788. 10. i. Ronald Reagan, 1981.
LIVING
November 2, 2008 | By Desmond Ryan FOR THE INQUIRER
In December 1859, Abraham Lincoln was asked to help a prospective biographer by providing an account of his life. Lincoln responded with four paragraphs and explained, "There is not much of it for the reason, I suppose, that there is not much of me. " Lincoln's humble summation would set an admirable example of brevity quickly lost on the scholars who have endlessly scrutinized his life. He was assassinated on Good Friday, 1865, and the fulsome appraisals began in laudatory sermons on Easter Sunday.
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