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Free Clinic

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NEWS
April 3, 1988 | By Cheryl Baisden, Special to The Inquirer
A woman sat quietly in the tiny waiting area of the Monroe Township town hall, rocking her newborn child in her arms. Behind the closed wooden door, Dr. William Hofer was attending to a preschool child, conducting a series of tests to determine the patient's malady. Monroe Township's archives record this scene at the community's first official free clinic program, on Dec. 20, 1950. "He (Hofer) examined two infants and one preschool child, noting the following defects," according to the journal entry, "two navels needing to be taped and one possible flat foot.
SPORTS
April 3, 1997 | By Mel Greenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Olympic women's basketball star Rebecca Lobo will give a free clinic in front of the CoreStates Center tomorrow night at 6 before the 76ers host the Indiana Pacers. The public is invited. Lobo, who also led Connecticut to an unbeaten season and the 1995 NCAA title, will be competing this summer for the New York Liberty in the WNBA - the NBA's new professional league for women, which begins play June 21. Along with fellow Olympian Sheryl Swoopes, Lobo is considered a spokeswoman for the league.
NEWS
June 22, 1987 | By JOHN M. BAER, Daily News Staff Writer
Dr. Victor Greco's new job with the state is to run free health clinics for poor people. So somebody in state government apparently didn't think it appropriate that Greco come to work in his "champagne over honey"-colored Rolls-Royce. After one day's commute in such luxury, Greco is now driving "a small Buick. " Greco, 60, denies that anyone suggested he stop driving the Rolls to work in his new job as deputy secretary for community health for the state Health Department.
SPORTS
July 22, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ollie Johnson is still working to give back to the city that gave him his first break in basketball before he turned 20. On Friday, the 64-year-old former NBA player from South Philadelphia was joined by former pros Paul Graham, Pat McFarland, Kenny Battle and Rich Rinaldi at Kensington's Rambler Recreation Center for a free youth basketball clinic. The clinic, titled   Full Court Press: Prep for Success, used basketball as a platform to teach life skills to at-risk youths.
NEWS
October 4, 2000 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In a twist on modern medicine, a small, free clinic in Frazer is a place where some of the doctors are paying to see the patients. And the rest of them may soon have to. Of the seven volunteer doctors at Community Volunteers in Medicine in Frazer, four are paying additional medical malpractice insurance just to volunteer there. The other three have been exempt from paying malpractice insurance because they are retired, but they may have to give up their right to prescribe medications if they want to keep volunteering.
NEWS
April 26, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / MIKE PLUNKETT
Fifty-one felines were vaccinated against rabies at a free clinic in Palmyra Borough Hall Saturday. The borough is expected to adopt an ordinance next month requiring cat owners to license their pets and have them vaccinated.
NEWS
July 17, 1999 | ROSE HOWERTER / Inquirer Suburban Staff
Former 76er World B. Free, center, of Philadelphia bends down to a kid's level to show dribbling skills to Kyle Smith, 3, left, and Elijah Nottingham, 2, both of Cherry Hill. He held a free clinic yesterday during the fourth annual 76ers summer hoops tour, held at the DeCou basketball courts in Cherry Hill.
SPORTS
May 29, 2008
Seaview Resort and Spa, in Galloway, N.J., will host Play Golf America Day on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. There is no admission charge at this event that will include equipment demonstrations, putting contests, long-drive contests, free lessons from PGA professionals, a free clinic from the John Jacobs/Shelby Futch Golf Academy and free golf at Seaview's Pines Course after 4 p.m.
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NEWS
December 5, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
ANDRE JOHNSON is "not even an art-gallery type of guy," but the 22-year-old found himself in the lobby of the Crane Arts building in North Philadelphia yesterday, waiting to get his juvenile record expunged. A man approached Johnson and asked why he was waiting instead of walking around the gallery, where a photography exhibit by Richard Ross showcases kids in prison. The young subjects' stories are told in their own words in accompanying captions. "I'm like, 'I don't really . . . ' " Johnson said.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Second in a series of profiles of New Jersey's U.S. Senate candidates. On a recent Monday morning, Mary Martinez needed $530 worth of medicine to treat her asthma. But Martinez, 49, a certified nurse's aide who works at a rehabilitation facility in Hillsborough, Somerset County, cannot afford health insurance. She anticipates also that she will have to take a pay cut soon to spend more time caring for her husband, who has diabetes. And now, she worries that President Obama's health-care overhaul will be a "kick in the teeth.
NEWS
July 23, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Patch Adams, a red-clown-nosed Robin Williams dreams up and runs a hospital where doctors enthusiastically work for janitors' pay, where orchards abut cancer wards, and the healing powers of laughter and love outshine scalpels and scans. The 1998 blockbuster was based on a true story, although the Gesundheit! Institute's medical facility had run out of money and closed 15 years before. The doctor's dream never died, however, and now has inspired another: a movement of Patch Adams Free Clinics nationwide, beginning in North Philadelphia.
SPORTS
July 22, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ollie Johnson is still working to give back to the city that gave him his first break in basketball before he turned 20. On Friday, the 64-year-old former NBA player from South Philadelphia was joined by former pros Paul Graham, Pat McFarland, Kenny Battle and Rich Rinaldi at Kensington's Rambler Recreation Center for a free youth basketball clinic. The clinic, titled   Full Court Press: Prep for Success, used basketball as a platform to teach life skills to at-risk youths.
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1988, Dr. Edward G. Holteen flew his single-engine plane to Jamaica, on a trip that was far from a vacation. The Fort Washington dentist was flying with another dentist and Dr. Holteen's wife, Sylvia, who recalled that the six-seater plane was packed with dental supplies. The Holteens drove to a town in the hills, the other dentist went to another remote location, and, for a week, each ran a free dental clinic. Her husband's arms "at the end of the week were very stiff and sore," his wife said.
NEWS
January 23, 2011 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
The man in the dentist's chair wears a wool cap, a down vest, and gratitude on his sleeve. Markius Glover, a 35-year-old unemployed IT professional, has gone two years without health insurance, but just had his teeth cleaned for free by Community Volunteers in Medicine in West Goshen. Rarely does anyone seem this thrilled at the discovery of "a few cavities. " Glover scored the first appointment of the day and makes plans to return a week later for fillings. He says he's already had a physical and blood work done at CVIM, adding, "I'm really fortunate a place like this exists.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2010 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
Best known for its critically acclaimed licensed adaptations, with "Legendary Talespinners" Dynamite has simply borrowed the spirit of a beloved classic and tossed in some fresh ingredients to create something fresh, new and joyful. In many ways, the first issue reads like a contemporary version of "Miracle on 34th Street," sans Christmas theme. We are immediately introduced to ultra-serious Abby, a medical-school student who is a paragon of professionalism and punctuality, and determined to be the best intern at the free clinic where the majority of the story takes place.
NEWS
September 16, 2009 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The free clinic will no longer be free in Philadelphia. The city's Board of Health last night approved a sliding scale of fees to be charged to uninsured people for care at the city's eight primary-care health centers. The fees - from $5 to $20 per visit - were announced earlier this year as part of Mayor Nutter's city budget. No date has been set for when the fees will be imposed, said Jeff Moran, a spokesman for the Department of Public Health. He said the fees were not tied to the city's budget fix that is now pending in Harrisburg.
NEWS
March 6, 2009 | By Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To a generation of Philadelphians, they are known simply as "the free clinics" - city-run health centers where one can get care ranging from pediatrics to dentistry to OB-GYN. But they may not be free any more. Even as public-health officials consider massive disruptions in health care - among the options on Mayor Nutter's desk is closing the city nursing home and up to three of the clinics - one change is increasingly likely: Patients without insurance will face fees on a sliding scale at all the centers.
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