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Free Enterprise

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NEWS
June 4, 2000 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The educational outreach programs initiated by students from Bucks County Community College received high marks last month at the Students in Free Enterprise international competition in Missouri. The college's team, which took home $5,000 in prize money, placed third and won two special competitions. About 40 teams from around the world competed in the two-year division. Business leaders judged teams on how well they taught principles of free enterprise. The BCCC team established Young Entrepreneur Day and created a coloring book, Bucky Bear Builds a Business, for elementary school students.
NEWS
May 14, 1998 | By Todd Bishop, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For the second straight year, the Students in Free Enterprise team from Bucks County Community College has claimed the international organization's two-year college championship. During the competition Monday and Tuesday in Kansas City, Mo., members of the Bucks team defeated 25 other two-year college teams, winning $4,000 in prize money, organizers said yesterday. Through business-style presentations, the contest is designed to evaluate community service projects completed by the teams throughout the year.
NEWS
August 23, 1992 | By Lisa L. Colangelo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Imagine walking into a convention of comic-book or baseball-card collectors and being handed a free bag chock-full of comics and cards to boost your own collection. That's exactly what match-cover collectors were treated to when they attended the Rathkamp Matchcover Society's annual convention at the Trevose Ramada last week. Rathcamp is a worldwide society that has more than 2,000 members. Collectors also reveled in the "freebie room" where thousands of match covers were placed on tables in heaps for the industrious to pour through.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1991 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
On Jan. 15, John Bogle, chairman of the Vanguard Group of Cos., will deliver a speech on his firm's history during a banquet at the Union League in Philadelphia. The occasion will celebrate the national recognition bestowed on the company by the Newcomen Society of the United States, a nonprofit Exton organization dedicated to "furthering the ideals of the free enterprise system. " "I feel honored," said Bogle, who founded the mutual-fund group in 1975. "My speech will be on the history of Vanguard, but will also tell what we'll look like in the next 30 years.
NEWS
October 30, 1994 | By Loretta Tofani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Wang family builds houses and rents them to other entrepreneurs. The Wangs have three children, flouting China's one-child-per-family policy. A few blocks away, the Jings own a grocery store. They also have three children. Down the block, the Wus make and sell winter jackets. They have three children. As more and more Chinese engage in free enterprise, they're finding it relatively easy to circumvent this country's totalitarian rules - including the rule against more than one child per couple and the laws against marriage for men under age 22 or women under age 20. The government can't punish these free enterprisers by firing them - they don't work for the state.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2002 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Her spiked chapeau doesn't look much like a hard hat, but the Statue of Liberty is the icon for a television commercial launched by a group of local independent building contractors who say they shouldn't be required to hire union labor. "It's a new dawn in America," the narrator intones as the camera pans by the statue and a U.S. flag and finally lands on four construction workers heading to a job site in the early morning's glow. "And there is a group of people going to work, building America every day," the narrator continues.
NEWS
May 10, 1996 | By Loretta Tofani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As she left her family's tiny apartment, Yu Baohong carefully looped two small, flimsy plastic bags on her wrist. That way, she wouldn't have to spend 10 cents for new plastic bags to carry her groceries home. Climbing on her black bicycle, she headed for Dao Jia Lou Street, an avenue lined with farmers' displays - towels spread on the ground and tables covered with meat, fruits and vegetables. She rode past the snow peas, the broccoli, the imported apples. Too expensive. She rode past the stands displaying hunks of beef.
NEWS
August 18, 1986
We who appreciate that free enterprise and political liberty are mutually dependent, that one cannot long exist without the other, sincerely thank the enlightened descendants of the Strawbridge & Clothier proprietorship for not surrendering their social responsibility to an entrepreneurial hustler whose tender offer largely involved tax-deductible bank loans. Our curious tax laws (present and proposed) actually force the citizen, perhaps unconstitutionally, to subsidize and unwillingly participate in the very destruction of responsible free enterprise.
NEWS
May 10, 1986
I reply to "The insurance crisis is a moral crisis" by Barry Schwartz (Op-ed Page, April 26). I have never heard any explanation so ludicrous, flawed and ill-founded as Mr. Schwartz's accusation that the free-enterprise system is the cause of the problem. Rather than following "instructions that issue from the Reagan White House," suit-conscious American people are merely living the philosophy that began to poison our thinking long before. Maybe Mr. Schwartz should look back to the birth of Lyndon Johnson's Great Society and Ralph Nader's consumerism.
NEWS
May 23, 2012 | Ed Weiner
With Memorial Day weekend just a few days away, my thoughts turn to the rites of summer — the shore, barbecues, Phillies games. For kids I hope they also turn to getting a summer job. Sadly, they're not getting much help from what they're taught in schools or an overregulated society that is cracking down on things like lemonade stands. This is the time of year for kids to do lemonade stands, mow lawns, have garage sales or find a thousand other ways to make a buck. In addition to the pleasure of having some of your own money, kids can learn about the free-enterprise system and maybe what it takes to get their feet wet with being an entrepreneur.
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NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
President Obama did not sound as if he expected the Republicans who control Congress to actually do anything with the economic policies he proposed Tuesday night in his sixth State of the Union speech. Instead, Obama seemed determined to influence the debate over income inequality and the diminishing fortunes of the middle class at the center of the developing 2016 campaign to choose his successor. "Will we accept an economy where only a few of us do spectacularly well? Or will we commit ourselves to an economy that generates rising incomes and chances for everyone who makes the effort?"
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Amy Worden and Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writers
As the 2014 gubernatorial campaign headed into its final weekend, Gov. Corbett got a boost from a Republican luminary on a swing through south-central Pennsylvania, while Democratic challenger Tom Wolf rallied union and abortion-rights supporters in the Philadelphia suburbs. As the governor listened, Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, the oft-talked-about potential presidential candidate who landed on the cover of Time e last week as "the most interesting man in politics," told a luncheon crowd of 300 in Chambersburg that he couldn't understand why Corbett wasn't a shoo-in, given the booming success of the Marcellus Shale natural-gas industry.
NEWS
March 7, 2013
The death of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez has the potential to birth a dramatic change in his oil-rich country's relationship with the United States. But it may take years to materialize, if it ever does. Much will depend on how far the Obama administration is willing to go to encourage Chavez's successor. Before Chavez's death Tuesday, Vice President Nicolas Maduro had implied that the United States had somehow given the president cancer. That absurd assertion contrasts with foreign policy analysts' assessment that if Maduro succeeds Chavez, he won't try to be the same type of revolutionary leader, and he may seek closer ties with America.
NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Arthur C. Brooks
Earlier this month in the first presidential debate, Mitt Romney made an unusual argument by modern political standards: that long-term deficit spending is not just an economic issue, but a moral one. "I think it's . . . not moral for my generation to keep spending massively more than we take in, knowing those burdens are going to be passed on to the next generation. " This is a notable occurrence, not just because Romney is frequently chided for being cool and detached, but because it represents a return to something our founders knew but succeeding generations have forgotten: Limited government and individual liberty aren't merely policy alternatives.
NEWS
September 20, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
COLUMBUS, Ohio - Republican Mitt Romney sought to get his presidential campaign back on course Tuesday as he scrambled to contain the fallout from a video of him telling wealthy donors that many of President Obama's supporters see themselves as victims and depend on government handouts. Democrats pounced on the footage, from a closed-door fund-raiser in Florida in May, as further proof of their contention that Romney is a callous businessman with no regard for regular people, while Romney defended the statement as an inelegantly phrased description of the philosophical differences between the two major parties.
NEWS
September 19, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, INQUIRER POLITICS WRITER
COLUMBUS, Ohio - Republican Mitt Romney sought to get his presidential campaign back on course Tuesday as he scrambled to contain the fallout from a video of him telling wealthy donors that many of President Obama's supporters see themselves as victims and depend on government handouts. Democrats pounced on the footage, from a closed-door fund-raiser in Florida in May, as further proof of their contention that Romney is a callous businessman with no regard for regular people, while Romney defended the statement as an inelegantly phrased description of the philosophical differences between the two major parties.
NEWS
June 17, 2012 | Freelance
Pavel Khodorkovsky is the son of Mikhail Khodorkovsky, former Yukos chief and an Amnesty International prisoner of conscience, and is also president of the Institute of Modern Russia Scanning the Father's Day aisle at the local card store, I see quickly how hard it will be to pick out something fitting. My father isn't a golfer, and he isn't known for his prowess on the football field or interest in home-improvement projects. There is no card that says "Happy Father's Day … from the Outside.
NEWS
May 23, 2012 | Ed Weiner
With Memorial Day weekend just a few days away, my thoughts turn to the rites of summer — the shore, barbecues, Phillies games. For kids I hope they also turn to getting a summer job. Sadly, they're not getting much help from what they're taught in schools or an overregulated society that is cracking down on things like lemonade stands. This is the time of year for kids to do lemonade stands, mow lawns, have garage sales or find a thousand other ways to make a buck. In addition to the pleasure of having some of your own money, kids can learn about the free-enterprise system and maybe what it takes to get their feet wet with being an entrepreneur.
NEWS
February 20, 2012 | By Charles Krauthammer
Give him points for cleverness. President Obama's birth control "accommodation" was as politically successful as it was morally meaningless. It was nothing but an accounting trick that still forces Catholic (and other religious) institutions to provide medical insurance that guarantees free birth control, tubal ligation, and morning-after abortifacients - all of which violate church doctrine on the sanctity of life. The trick is that these birth control and abortion services will supposedly be provided independently and free of charge by a religious institution's insurance company.
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Michael Smerconish
An exasperated Mayor Nutter recently reacted to the news of a shooting that took the lives of three Philadelphia teens by saying: "The first way for young people to stop this stuff is for young people to be home, where they're supposed to be home, and for adults not to act like idiots and assholes out in the streets of our city shooting at kids in a car. " The mayor's words were broadcast on Fox29 on the same day, ironically, that the Supreme Court...
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