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Free Jazz

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NEWS
June 5, 1987 | By NELS NELSON, Daily News Jazz Columnist
F is for Friday and F is for free. And F is for 10 summer evenings of fine jazz by first-rate artists. It all begins at 7:30 tonight with F-for-Fritz Jones, a musician known and admired the wide world over as Ahmad Jamal, at the Penn's Landing pianoforte. Jamal is the opening gun for an array of internationally famous jazz talent that will include saxophonist Gary Bartz, the Russian expatriate trumpeter Valerie Ponomarev, the ex-Ellington vocalist Anita Moore, blues singer- pianist Mose Allison and the trumpet superstar Freddie Hubbard, and such favorites of Philadelphia jazz fandom as guitarist Steve Giordano, string virtuoso John Blake, pianist Sumi Tonooka and the fusion group Reverie.
NEWS
December 1, 1987 | By MARIANNE COSTANTINOU, Daily News Nightlife Writer
Get out your handkerchiefs . . . and wallets: The Monday and Tuesday night After-Work-Get-Jazzed series at Jewel's jazz club is barely a couple of weeks old, but the No Cover policy already has gone the way of all good things. Tonight, those wanting to hear a trombone blast from Steve Turre will have to dish out $2. And a doubleheader next Monday and Tuesday nights featuring tenor saxophonist Garry Thomas and trumpeter Wallace Rooney will cost $3. Bill Mann, the owner, says that even with a full house of 70 customers, he just can't afford the freebies.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2001 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
If Improvisational Philadelphia - free jazz, avant rock, ambient electronics - had a bible, Elliot Levin would be one of its principal authors. Since the '70s, the West Philadelphia native - as flutist, poet and tenor saxophonist raining down sheets of latter-day Coltranesque sound and Ornette Coleman-like "harmolodics" - has moved through music and performance art like St. Thomas, quietly preaching the gospel of the good (albeit weird) groove. Tonight, he'll put in some flute time with Cee Knowledge & the Cosmic Funk Orchestra at Upstage, where his group Deep Space Posse also helps open for Cee. (See Page 17)
NEWS
September 5, 1994 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MYRNA LUDWIG
The Dave Posmontier Quintet gets (from left) Steven White, Hunter Steel and Erin Steel up on their feet during yesterday's South Street Jazz Festival at Head House Square. Free jazz is on tap every Sunday afternoon this month.
NEWS
October 15, 2012
John Tchicai, 76, a Danish saxophonist and pioneer of free jazz in Europe, died Oct. 8, said his former wife, Margriet Naber. No cause of death was given, but he had been in a coma since suffering a brain hemorrhage in June. Mr. Tchicai moved to New York in 1963 and cofounded the New York Contemporary Five with Archie Shepp. He later became a leading figure of the jazz avant-garde movement in Europe. He also played with John Coltrane, Milford Graves, Carla Bley, and Steve Swallow. Mr. Tchicai was born to a Danish mother and a Congolese father in Denmark.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1996 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Archie Shepp came on stage Sunday night looking more like another tenor saxophonist, Ben Webster. He wore a dark, three-piece, pin-striped suit, a black fedora and a deep tenor sax that warbled sweetly on ballads and delved nicely into free jazz. Either way, it made for a satisfying first set at the Blue Moon Jazz Club. Shepp began by demanding more vibrato from the sound system. When he got it, he extracted soulful beauty from the standard "Everything Happens to Me. " But most of the 75-minute set slammed up-tempo.
NEWS
April 10, 2006 | By Karl Stark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You have to experience John Medeski's piano to appreciate its brashness. It can be confounding, the riffs so at odds with their surroundings that they shock and jerk you out of a groove. Then he can pound out riffs from the African American tradition that blow all that pretentious smoke away. The dual nature of the trio Medeski Martin and Wood - part free jazz, part dance band - was much on display at the band's 90-minute show at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall on Friday night.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | By Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
He sang, he stroked, he gamboled, and at his slightest move, a crew of caped musicians built to a roar or hushed to a whimper. One player put a burning torch to his arms and feet while another cavorted the length of the stage in a flowing yellow cloak. Welcome to the Sun Ra concert, an event for which the airlines should have given frequent-flier mileage. The two-hour extravaganza last night featured an ample helping of Sun Ra's eclectic music, merging swing, be-bop and free jazz in a swirling, carnival atmosphere.
NEWS
June 28, 2010
Fred Anderson, 81, a tenor saxophonist who tied the bebop innovations of Charlie Parker to the explorations of later avant-garde musicians and who owned the Velvet Lounge, a South Side Chicago club known for fostering the careers of emerging players, died Thursday. Mr. Anderson was admitted to a hospital June 12 in Evanston, Ill., complaining of stomach pains. He suffered a heart attack June 14 and, afterward, his son Eugene told the Chicago Tribune, was comatose and unlikely to recover.
NEWS
February 5, 1999 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
He may be a last-minute substitution (for laid-back vocalist Michael Franks), but many ticket holders should be delighted that saxophonist Gato Barbieri is now headlining the grand Valentine's Day finale of the Peco Energy Jazz Fest at the Pennsylvania Convention Center on Feb. 14. His presence means the event will go out with a high-energy, rhythmically charged bang, with one of the most entertaining, gregarious and just plain zesty saxophone blowers...
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NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Shaun Brady, For the Daily News
WHEN PIANIST Sumi Tonooka headlines the 10th annual Lancaster Avenue Jazz & Arts Festival on Saturday, it will mark her second time at the event, having been a special guest with guitarist Monette Sudler's band at the 2010 installment. But she was far from a stranger to the neighborhood even then; though she's called New York, Boston, and Seattle home over the years, Tonooka was born and raised in Powelton Village. "The festival is literally right down the street from where I grew up," Tonooka said last week, already in Philly and barraged with reminders of her old environs.
NEWS
August 1, 2013
Philadelphia has been home to a constellation of jazz greats, including Billie Holiday and Dizzy Gillespie. One of its brightest stars was John Coltrane, the saxophonist who changed the trajectory of the form with his avant-garde experimentations in modal and free jazz. While Coltrane's Strawberry Mansion rowhouse was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1999, Philadelphians have not yet matched the virtuoso's imagination and energy in commemorating and capitalizing on his connection to the city.
NEWS
October 15, 2012
John Tchicai, 76, a Danish saxophonist and pioneer of free jazz in Europe, died Oct. 8, said his former wife, Margriet Naber. No cause of death was given, but he had been in a coma since suffering a brain hemorrhage in June. Mr. Tchicai moved to New York in 1963 and cofounded the New York Contemporary Five with Archie Shepp. He later became a leading figure of the jazz avant-garde movement in Europe. He also played with John Coltrane, Milford Graves, Carla Bley, and Steve Swallow. Mr. Tchicai was born to a Danish mother and a Congolese father in Denmark.
NEWS
August 26, 2012 | By Vernon Clark and Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Staff Writers
Byard Lancaster, 70, the Philadelphia jazz musician who earned an international reputation as an avant-garde musical explorer in the 1960s and 1970s, died of cancer Thursday, Aug. 23, at KeystoneCare in Wyndmoor, according to his sister, Mary Ann Lancaster Tyler. In the decades that followed his early fame, he became a local institution, playing saxophone and flute on the streets, in subway concourses, and at clubs around the city. Mr. Lancaster played alto, soprano, and tenor saxophones, as well as flute, clarinet, and piano.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2011 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
Sam Beam has taken Iron & Wine in directions far removed from the hushed acoustic settings of his early albums. "It's like food: Why eat only one type of food when there's so many different types to try?" Beam asks, trying to explain. Beloved for the sparse intimacies of home-recorded The Creek Drank the Cradle (2002) and the slightly more fleshed-out Our Endless Numbered Days (2004), Beam expanded his palette by collaborating with Calexico for 2005's In the Reins.
NEWS
November 23, 2010
I T REALLY RUBS me the wrong way when small-minded politicians cut off their noses and end up spiting not only their own faces - but ours, too. The recent reversal of fortune for state Rep. Dwight Evans of West Oak Lane as chairman of the House Appropriations Committee at the hands of at least two local Democrats is bad for the entire city. There was a time when I wouldn't set foot - or car - in West Oak Lane. Especially Ogontz Avenue, where pothole-filled streets were hazardous to any set of wheels.
NEWS
June 28, 2010
Fred Anderson, 81, a tenor saxophonist who tied the bebop innovations of Charlie Parker to the explorations of later avant-garde musicians and who owned the Velvet Lounge, a South Side Chicago club known for fostering the careers of emerging players, died Thursday. Mr. Anderson was admitted to a hospital June 12 in Evanston, Ill., complaining of stomach pains. He suffered a heart attack June 14 and, afterward, his son Eugene told the Chicago Tribune, was comatose and unlikely to recover.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2009 | By Steve Klinge FOR THE INQUIRER
When Philly DJ and producer Diplo (Wesley Pentz) was in South Africa a few years ago, he asked around to find out what was happening in the underground music scene. Someone pointed Diplo in the direction of Johannesburg's BLK JKS (pronounced "blackjacks"), and intrigued by a song on their MySpace page, he arranged to meet them for an hour at the airport as he was leaving the country. That meeting led to the tour that comes to Philadelphia on Saturday night. "To cut a long story short, those events meant other people heard about us - his people, his friends - and we met people through him. And eventually people know people who know people, and we ended up here," BLK JKS guitarist Mpumi Mcata said with a laugh.
NEWS
May 25, 2009 | By Sam Adams FOR THE INQUIRER
A man of many talents and as many names, Will Oldham is at once folksy and gnomic, a bearded oracle of the sacred and profane. At the Trocadero on Friday night, he moved between matters earthly and spiritual, often, as in "There Is Something I Have to Say," letting them overlap. "Can we find communion again?" he sang. "In the bedroom, or just as friends. " During his early career in the 1990s, Oldham shifted identities with nearly every recording: Palace Brothers, Palace Songs, just plain Palace.
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