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NEWS
March 22, 1997 | By Amitabh Pal
Albania reveals the ultimate consequence of an unregulated free-market system. It is a country in complete disorder. At least 100 people have been killed in the last two weeks of violence. Armed vigilantes roam the country. The army stood by while groups of civilians looted military armories. There is no functioning government. The Albanians had a complete faith in the free market, and the market did them in. They invested huge sums of money in gigantic pyramid schemes.
NEWS
April 25, 1992 | By JAMES B. POTTER
Once again, the Bush administration strikes a blow for the free market system and economic prosperity through deregulation with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) decision to raise the ownership limits on broadcasting stations from 12 AMs and 12 FMs to 30 each. May Congress swiftly approve the change. At a time when interest in the AM dial is at an all-time low (remember what happened to WCAU), this move permits the broadcast spectrum to be exploited for maximum benefit, directly to new station owners, and indirectly to the public at large.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ayn Rand, the novelist and philosophical thinker whose books have for decades been ignored by literature and philosophy departments, had her revenge earlier this month when Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney named sometime Randian Paul Ryan as his vice presidential pick. "The reason I got involved in public service, by and large, if I had to credit one thinker, one person, it would be Ayn Rand," the Wisconsin congressman told the Randian Atlas Society in 2005. The attention has generated a swell of posthumous popularity for Rand that has boosted sales of her books Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead , which jumped 20 percent on Amazon.com in one day last week, according to Bloomberg News Service.
NEWS
June 4, 1992 | BY MOLLY IVINS
Nothing like a good special interest fight to show what government is about. There's a beaut going on in Washington right now, billed as Landowners vs. Environmentalists. In fact, it's a classic special interest fight: one special interest against the rest of the taxpayers. Can you think of one good reason why the taxpayers of this country should subsidize insurance for people who own beach-front property? Neither can I. But we do. And the Senate's attempt to undo it has touched off yowls of outrage.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sergei, a 35-year-old farm worker, traveled 500 miles by train from Leningrad to the bustling black market in Vilnius, where he hoped to sell a few bolts of cloth, a couple of boxes of Russian cigarettes and a Ukrainian electric razor. He displayed his tiny store of goods on a low, wooden table for all to see and touch. It didn't look like much, but in reality, Sergei is one of a growing number of budding entrepreneurs, scrambling to make a ruble and to fill the supply gaps in the crumbling Soviet economic system.
NEWS
April 13, 1986
Edwin Guthman's April 6 column raised the question as to why President Reagan doesn't poll well with Inquirer readers. Perhaps the answer lies in the possibility that those opposed to him are more organized and expressive ("special interest" and "political action groups"?) and those in agreement are less so (a truly "silent majority"?). Another explanation could be frustration with your knee-jerk criticism to virtually every initiative of the Reagan administration and a feeling that an opposing viewpoint would not get an airing.
NEWS
January 29, 2003 | By E.J. Dionne
For decades, the political left was hung up on an old Marxist notion. Because capitalism was inherently unjust, as the British Labor Party once declared proudly, social justice could be guaranteed only by government ownership of the "means of production, distribution and exchange. " The idea succumbed to a slow but well-deserved death. Most of the left came to realize that government ownership of basic industry bred inefficiencies, retarded growth - and rarely produced the benefits it promised.
NEWS
September 26, 1997 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a tale that could come straight from the Harvard Business School, the American craving for Beanie Babies is giving the proletariat of China a crash course in the cutthroat laws of a free market economy. The demand for Beanie Babies may be in America, but the supply is here. And so Bongo, Sparky, Nip and Ears have been drafted to serve in the price war, where cartels fix prices, neighbors undercut neighbors, and market share is everything. The bean-bag animals are made in factories near the southern city of Guangzhou for export to the United States.
NEWS
November 26, 1996 | By Inga Saffron, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If any Russian consumer product should be able to withstand the transition to a free market, it's vodka. The national drink, vodka is Russia's aperitif, table wine and nightcap all rolled into one sinus-searing brew. Russians take their vodka straight, gulped rather than sipped. And when they open a bottle, they finish it. So why is it that Russian vodka producers are struggling to survive? At the Tulaspirit vodka factory here, three hours south of Moscow, the bottling machines stand silent most of the time.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1991 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mark Vosbikian works for a little company with a big problem. His family's business, Hardware & Industrial Tool Co. Inc., of Delanco, which makes garden tools, faces relentless competition from Asian exporters. Early this year, Vosbikian decided to seek help from a little-known federal program - with a big problem. The program is the Trade Adjustment Assistance Centers that Congress created in 1974 to help manufacturers in industries vulnerable to imports. And the problem is the President of the United States.
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SPORTS
December 20, 2014 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
It would make little sense for Brandon Graham to sign a contract with the Eagles before testing free agency. The team recently reached out to Graham's agent to open negotiations, which may be the Cinderella story of the year considering how close the former defensive end-turned-linebacker thought he came to getting released or traded before the season. "It feels good, because at the end of the day I wasn't supposed to be here," Graham said this week. "I'm just happy I changed the opinion of a lot of people.
SPORTS
July 2, 2014 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 76ers parted ways Monday with James Anderson, on the eve of the NBA's free-agency period. The 6-foot-6 shooting guard would have received a guaranteed $1.06 million had he remained on the roster past Monday. The Sixers aren't likely to go after high-level free agents; they are expected to identify a few lower-level players. "I think we will be open-minded," general manager Sam Hinkie said of the free-agency period, which begins Tuesday. "I don't know exactly what we will do there.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
After buying Time Warner Cable , Comcast Corp. says, it will authorize spending up to $10 billion more to buy back its own shares on the stock market. Apple boss Tim Cook said recently that his company plans to spend an extra $30 billion doing the same thing, boosting Apple's total share-buyback authority to $90 billion. Why do these household-name companies that count tens of millions of Americans as customers plan to pump all that cash into their own stock? How can they afford to, after funding multibillion-dollar acquisitions, system upgrades, research, marketing projects, and share dividends?
SPORTS
November 6, 2013 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Phillies would not offer Carlos Ruiz a $14.1 million salary on Monday, and their devotion to the popular and productive catcher will be tested in the coming weeks. Ruiz officially became a free agent when he was not offered arbitration for 2014. That decision was a mere formality. The two sides are interested in maintaining their relationship, and Monday's decision had no effect whatsoever on those negotiations. If anything, the Phillies widened Ruiz's market by not tying him to draft-pick compensation.
SPORTS
March 14, 2013 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
It was exciting to see the Eagles make a big splash on the first day of NFL free agency, especially since it was Nnamdi Asomugha being thrown overboard. Hey, at least he made contact. The Eagles will pay Asomugha $4 million not to play for them in 2013 and that is the best bargain general manager Howie Roseman could have made. There are two ways to make your team better, and subtraction is the easy one. It is the addition part that gets tricky, as Asomugha's two-year display of ineffectiveness demonstrated.
NEWS
February 6, 2013
By Jim Sleeper The Senate Judiciary Committee was told often enough last week that the United States' intolerably high levels of murder and maiming by gunfire would drop sharply if we had the gun control of other developed nations. (Only Mexico and Guatemala have constitutional provisions resembling our Second Amendment.) It won't happen, unless we dissolve the deep bond between our libertarian individualism and our glorification of runaway corporate engines that are disrupting public trust more brutally than their own managers ever intended or know how to stop.
SPORTS
December 15, 2012 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ben Revere was escorted into the Phillies clubhouse Thursday afternoon by two team officials. Inside, the lights were dimmed to accentuate the Christmas decorations, complete with a village of mechanical caroler figurines in the center of the room. Their new present, a speedy, defensive-minded centerfielder, was unwrapped on a day of seismic shifts in the baseball world. The Phillies, for now, are relegated to watching. "I know they'll make moves," Revere said. The options are dwindling.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ayn Rand, the novelist and philosophical thinker whose books have for decades been ignored by literature and philosophy departments, had her revenge earlier this month when Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney named sometime Randian Paul Ryan as his vice presidential pick. "The reason I got involved in public service, by and large, if I had to credit one thinker, one person, it would be Ayn Rand," the Wisconsin congressman told the Randian Atlas Society in 2005. The attention has generated a swell of posthumous popularity for Rand that has boosted sales of her books Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead , which jumped 20 percent on Amazon.com in one day last week, according to Bloomberg News Service.
NEWS
June 7, 2012 | John Baer
Let's agree that on the surface Gov. Corbett's plan to give the Netherlands-based global-energy giant Shell $1.7 billion at a time he seeks cuts in social services and education probably isn't playing all that well.   The guv, after all, already holds a cemented reputation for favoring the Marcellus Shale/natural-gas industry, which favored him with $1 million in campaign contributions. So it's hard to see how, among most Pennsylvanians, this Shell thing helps his popularity, although he doesn't seem to care much right now about being popular with most Pennsylvanians.
NEWS
March 22, 2012
Need civil discussion on climate Amid the questionable reasoning and unhelpful sarcasm in Charles Krauthammer's commentary "Here's seaweed in your tank" (Monday), it is disturbing to find not even a passing reference to the consequences of our fossil-fuel consumption. I don't know whether Krauthammer thinks he knows better than the overwhelming majority of the world's climate scientists or whether he thinks we need not be concerned about the world we leave our descendants. If conservatives showed any interest in conserving the only ecosystem we have evolved to inhabit, or, if you prefer, that God created for us, then perhaps we could have the kind of civil discussion needed to make the hard decisions.
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