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December 9, 1998 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Don't number ABC newsman Sam Donaldson among the celebs who believe that Mumia Abu-Jamal is innocent. "Everything that we looked at compellingly points to the fact that Mumia shot [Philadelphia police officer Daniel] Faulkner in cold blood . . . and was convicted properly, and was sentenced according to the laws of the state of Pennsylvania," Donaldson said in a telephone interview yesterday. "And as far as I'm concerned, as long as it's on the books, the death sentence has to be carried out. " Donaldson got a primer in the case of the convicted cop-killer and his Hollywood A-list defenders while researching a piece that airs at 10 tonight on 20/20.
NEWS
December 14, 2011 | By Marc Lamont Hill, Daily News Columnist
LAST WEEK, Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams announced that his office would no longer pursue the death penalty against Mumia Abu-Jamal. This announcement, combined with the huge pro-Mumia event at the National Constitution Center, has brought his case back to the center of public conversation. As a Mumia supporter, and as a friend who has co-authored a book with him, I have many questions to answer over the case. Here are the ones I get asked most often: Q: Why are you backing a cop-killer?
NEWS
December 20, 2001
With the stroke of his pen, U.S. District Judge William H. Yohn Jr. scrubbed cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal's role as poster child for the growing opposition to death row. Good move, judge. Not only that, the decision works on two fronts. One, it's likely Abu-Jamal never will feel the sharp end of an executioner's needle. That fact should put an end to his distracting presence as an international rallying cry against a flawed U.S. capital punishment system. Two, it's just as clear Abu-Jamal will remain where he so richly deserves to be - locked away for life in a prison cell with a view of the sun through iron bars.
NEWS
April 23, 1999
By the tens of thousands, caring people are expected to come to Philadelphia to march for justice. Yet tomorrow's event cannot possibly advance the cause of justice. There will be banners decrying police misconduct - a grave problem that has disgraced departments in Philadelphia, New York and around the country. But the dedicated opponents of uniformed brutality, racism and corruption are undercutting their credibility by marching and rallying on behalf of a convicted cop-killer, Mumia Abu-Jamal.
NEWS
October 16, 1999 | by Jim Smith, and Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writers Staff writers Nicole Weisensee and Michael Hinkelman contributed to this report
Some 17 years after a jury said he should die for killing a cop execution-style, and one day after his death date was finally set, the state's best-known death row inmate, Mumia Abu-Jamal, has taken his case to the federal courts, seeking a new trial. "Every element of the trial in this case. . .was riddled with misconduct and error," his lawyers wrote in a 160-page brief filed yesterday in federal court in Philadelphia. In addition to the legal moves yesterday, pro-Abu-Jamal demonstrators took to the streets, and police were investigating the defacement of a South Philadelphia mural of former Mayor Frank Rizzo, including the spray-painted words "Free Mumia.
NEWS
May 1, 1999 | By Jonathan Rosen
Last Saturday, thousands of activists came to Philadelphia to take their places near Independence Mall in the grand tradition of American protest. They came to place Mumia Abu-Jamal on the pedestal of the wrongfully accused and politically oppressed. Comparing him to Sacco and Vanzetti, Dred Scott and Joe Hill, they attacked the racism and militarism of American society and the capitalist system that consigns so many poor and blacks to forgotten lives of political oppression. I would have been a likely candidate to join in. After all, I am a political activist.
NEWS
July 20, 1995 | by Kitty Caparella and Gloria Campisi Daily News Staff Writers
Wearing a "Free Mumia" button on his purple shirt, Robert Rockwell taunted the protesting 300 off-duty cops by holding up his right hand and shouting, "Sieg heil!" "Shame! Shame!" retorted the cops, dressed in shorts, T-shirts and sneakers, and holding a vigil in memory of slain Policeman Daniel Faulkner. Faulkner was the officer whom Mumia Abu-Jamal was convicted of fatally shooting in 1981. The standoff last night took place on Locust Street near 13th, just outside the union hall of the Hospital Workers Union Local 1199C, where a "Free Mumia" fund-raiser had been canceled.
NEWS
November 8, 1998 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They came marching down Broad Street, a throng of several hundred people beating drums, waving banners, and chanting: "Free Mumia! Free Mumia!" Clots of police officers stood at a nonthreatening distance. Bullhorns blared. Cars honked. Video cameras caught it all on tape. "We're going to free - Mumia - Abu - Jamal - brick by brick - wall by wall. " The chant had the cadence of the antiwar and civil rights movements, to which a speaker referred at a premarch rally yesterday at the State Office Building on North Broad.
NEWS
July 20, 1995 | By Suzanne Sataline, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Daniel Faulkner's brethren gathered yesterday near the corner where the police officer left them. Tom Kurowski, like most of his colleagues, had never met the Sixth District cop. But at 21 and in his first year on the job, he still remembers the early morning of Dec. 9, 1981 when Faulkner was shot to death. "They say you can become callous or numb over certain things. " But not about an officer shot, Kurowski, of the 17th District, said. "It's just like a little kid getting killed.
NEWS
September 22, 2010 | By Amy S. Rosenberg and Stephen Jiwanmall, Inquirer Staff Writers
Nearly 29 years after Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner was fatally shot at 13th and Locust Streets, echoes of the epic and polarizing case filled city streets Thursday as two movies premiered with emotional and clashing views of death-row inmate Mumia Abu-Jamal. At the Merriam Theater, where local filmmaker Tigre Hill was premiering his film The Barrel of a Gun, the officer's widow, Maureen Faulkner, arrived to a sidewalk filled with hundreds of police officers, their motorcycles lined up along Broad Street.
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NEWS
October 2, 2014 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Invitations to speak at commencement typically go to prominent politicians, A-list celebrities, or, occasionally, a bureaucrat with a free weekend. Students at a Vermont college have gone a different route. They've invited a convicted cop killer. Mumia Abu-Jamal, serving a life term for the 1981 killing of Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner, is scheduled to address 20 graduates at Goddard College on Sunday through prerecorded remarks. His conviction remains divisive.
NEWS
October 22, 2012
DEC. 9, 1981, "a date which will live in infamy. " The cold-blooded murder of Officer Daniel Faulkner by Wesley Cook, a/k/a Mumia Abu-Jamal, will forever haunt his beloved wife, Maureen, as well as the Philadelphia Police Department. As a result of this most horrific and despicable crime, Abu-Jamal has become one of the most popular inmates worldwide since Al Capone. To add insult to travesty, Mayor Catherine Peyge, of the Paris suburb Bobigny, named a street after Abu-Jamal, citing the French fight for "respect and justice" ( Daily News , Oct. 16)
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer
REPUBLICAN U.S. Rep. Mike Fitzpatrick has refused to denounce his party's widely disputed attempt to link his opponent to convicted Philadelphia cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal. "Others talk about whatever issues you want - I'm focused on jobs and the economy," the Bucks County Republican said in an interview Thursday. Asked repeatedly whether he would prefer that the attack be withdrawn so that the race could focus on "jobs and the economy," Fitzpatrick simply repeated his original statement.
NEWS
December 17, 2011
Illogical defense Mark Lewis Taylor's prime argument for releasing convicted killer Mumia Abu-Jamal seems to be that his lengthy stay in prison constitutes cruel and unusual punishment ("Why freedom makes even more sense now," Sunday). This is akin to someone intentionally raising his own thermostat higher and higher over a long period of time and then complaining that he's spent years being forced to sweat. If our increasingly left-leaning court system ceased its practice of allowing endless appeals to death sentences - often on the most idiotic grounds - then convicted murderers like Abu-Jamal would not be forced to languish on death row for years.
NEWS
December 14, 2011 | By Marc Lamont Hill, Daily News Columnist
LAST WEEK, Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams announced that his office would no longer pursue the death penalty against Mumia Abu-Jamal. This announcement, combined with the huge pro-Mumia event at the National Constitution Center, has brought his case back to the center of public conversation. As a Mumia supporter, and as a friend who has co-authored a book with him, I have many questions to answer over the case. Here are the ones I get asked most often: Q: Why are you backing a cop-killer?
NEWS
September 30, 2011
Lydia Barashango, 64, a nurse and social worker who was the sister of Mumia Abu-Jamal, died Wednesday, Sept. 28, in Maryland of breast cancer. Friends said she had been living in Baltimore. Mrs. Barashango was a strong defender of her brother, the Philadelphia radio reporter and Black Panther who was convicted and sentenced to death by a jury in 1982 for the murder of Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner. Abu-Jamal, 57, has become the object of a decades-long debate over the use of the death penalty for his role in the Dec. 9, 1981, shooting of Faulkner.
NEWS
September 22, 2010 | By Amy S. Rosenberg and Stephen Jiwanmall, Inquirer Staff Writers
Nearly 29 years after Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner was fatally shot at 13th and Locust Streets, echoes of the epic and polarizing case filled city streets Thursday as two movies premiered with emotional and clashing views of death-row inmate Mumia Abu-Jamal. At the Merriam Theater, where local filmmaker Tigre Hill was premiering his film The Barrel of a Gun, the officer's widow, Maureen Faulkner, arrived to a sidewalk filled with hundreds of police officers, their motorcycles lined up along Broad Street.
NEWS
April 1, 2008 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Carrying signs and chanting "Free Mumia," about two dozen supporters of Mumia Abu-Jamal turned out yesterday at the federal courthouse to protest last week's appeals court decision that gave him a reprieve from death, at least for now, but let stand his murder conviction. "What they came up with was wrong," Pam Africa, a member of MOVE, said of Thursday's ruling by a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. Africa and other supporters said they wanted a new trial for Abu-Jamal or at least a hearing on his legal claim that black people had been intentionally excluded from the jury in his trial for the 1981 killing of Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner.
NEWS
December 3, 2006 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Google "Mumia Abu-Jamal" and you'll get more than 1 million hits for sites containing his name. For "Police Officer Daniel Faulkner," it's only 22,800. Twenty-five years ago this week, at the corner of 13th and Locust Streets - before the Internet became a household word - an exchange of gunfire that left Faulkner dead and Abu-Jamal wounded linked the names of the two men inextricably in the city's history. The survivor was transformed into a revolutionary folk hero, an international cause celebre; the dead man became a memory whose cause has been taken up by supporters determined to ensure that his is more than a bit part in a death-penalty drama still without a final act. Both sides - those who are determined Abu-Jamal is innocent and those who are equally determined that he is not - will gather again in Philadelphia this week.
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