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NEWS
December 24, 2003
AT A TIME when most of us are busily preparing for Christmas, let us remember and thank our troops fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan. To those who protected our freedom in World War II, thank you. To those who fought in Korea and Vietnam, thank you. To those who fought in the Gulf War, thank you. And to those firefighters and police officers in New York, the ones who head into a burning building as we are heading out, and lost their...
NEWS
January 19, 1986
South African Bishop Desmond Tutu, who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984 for his leadership of nonviolent opposition to apartheid, paid a hectic two- day visit to Philadelphia last week. At packed assemblies around the city, he called for divestment of South Africa-related stocks, thanked American supporters and vowed that efforts to end white-minority domination would continue. "Freedom is coming," he said.
NEWS
July 17, 2006
WHEN THIS great country was in its infancy, I don't believe that our forefathers envisioned freedom of religion to include religions or cults that sanction the killing of non-believers. Can someone from please explain exactly what constitutes a religion verses a cult, and just exactly what religions are recognized as legitimate religions per the Constitution? If the killing of innocent people is considered a crime, why do politicians turn a blind eye toward literature that specifically sanctions the killing of non-believers?
NEWS
June 30, 2006 | Brian P. Tierney
FOR TOO MANY years, newspaper ownership in this country has increasingly been concentrated in the hands of a few large companies. Newspaper traditionalists have been mourning the loss of individual community character, as well as spirited personality, in their hometown papers. The industry has been resigned to a fate of bland, generic corporatization, and concepts like family or local stewardship were as quaint as hot-lead type. The trend has seemed so inevitable, so relentless, and so unstoppable that even giants like Times Mirror and Knight Ridder have succumbed to the same family squabbles and Wall Street pressure that swallowed up great newspapers from Louisville to Des Moines to Los Angeles to Boston.
NEWS
July 5, 2008 | SOLOMON JONES
YESTERDAY was Independence Day - the day America told Britain to go fly a kite. Because our country's founders had the foresight to make that bold move, we now have the freedom to barbecue and go to clearance sales on every major holiday. I, along with my family and friends, will be enjoying each of these freedoms this holiday weekend. However, we'll be making a few minor adjustments to our usual Independence Day celebration due to the economic slowdown. We won't be throwing any steaks on the grill.
NEWS
October 29, 1987
One paragraph deep in yesterday's account of the disgruntled investor who blew away the manager of a Merrill Lynch office in Miami stood out: "About 10 a.m. Katz left the brokerage house and drove his 1986 Pontiac Fiero sports car to the Tamiami Gun Shop South on Dixie Highway. He used a credit card to purchase the .357 (magnum revolver) for $300 to $400 . . . . " Whatever drove Arthur H. Katz to murder the branch manager, shoot his broker and then kill himself, Florida's super-lenient gun law should be credited with an assist.
NEWS
January 13, 1987
The word from South Africa is bad. The state of emergency has been intensified. Press censorship has become more severe. Black education groups are not permitted to hold meetings. The imprisonment of dissenters continues. People continue to be killed, and bordering African nations live in constant fear of attack. Some observers think this deterioration of conditions is evidence of the failure of U.S. economic sanctions. But those who want to reinvest U.S. dollars - in the wake of increased South African trade with Israel, Japan, Taiwan, South Korea, Switzerland and South America - are dead wrong.
NEWS
July 17, 1993 | Inquirer photographs by April Saul
Protesters gathered outside City Hall yesterday to begin a 24-hour fast demanding the release of political prisoners in Vietnam. The Movement for Freedom and Democracy in Vietnam is organizing the demonstration.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | By DAVID KAIRYS
Somehow we can't seem to get straight what we mean by freedom. Everybody's for it. But why is a refusal to honor the flag an exercise of freedom to some and a desecration of freedom to others? The answer lies in divergent visions of freedom throughout our history, and in the reemergence in recent years of an old, repressive tradition with a new face. As in the past, the flag has become a central focus of the current debate - in the presidential campaign, in the furor over its use in a Chicago art exhibit and in a case now before the Supreme Court involving a Texas law making it a crime to destroy or deface the flag in circumstances upsetting to others.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 3, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Now-aging firebrands who endured fear and pain to desegregate Girard College 50 years ago walked smiling past its imposing stone walls Friday. They were greeted on the steps of Founder's Hall by red-blazered students - mostly minorities - who applauded, then sang for the 10 so-called freedom fighters, whose efforts opened the school for the very kids who were honoring them. "We are your legacy," senior Brandon Dixon, a national scholarship winner bound for Harvard, told the one-time demonstrators, one of whom cried openly.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The question of whether Msgr. William J. Lynn may remain on house arrest or must return to prison to complete his three- to six-year term for child endangerment will be heard Thursday by a Philadelphia judge. The hearing was set by Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina after the District Attorney's Office moved to have the Catholic cleric's bail revoked when the state Supreme Court reinstated Lynn's conviction Monday. Lynn, 64, was convicted following a landmark 13-week trial in 2012 involving his role supervising priests accused of sexually abusing children.
NEWS
April 4, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
It didn't take long for the uproar over religious-freedom laws in Indiana and Arkansas to reverberate in Pennsylvania. Democrats, including Gov. Wolf, grabbed onto the controversy this week to bolster their bid for a state ban on discrimination against members of the LGBT community. The proposal would make it illegal for businesses to fire workers or deny customers because they are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender. It would also offer protections beyond antidiscrimination measures already passed by more than 30 municipalities, including Philadelphia, Haverford, Abington, and New Hope.
SPORTS
April 2, 2015 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
TO GIVE YOU an idea of how influential sports have become in this nation's fractionalized and petty political discourse, just look at the timeline since Indiana Gov. Mike Pence signed Senate Bill 101 into law last Thursday. Apple CEO Tim Cook, who is openly gay, condemned the law, known as the Religious Freedom Restoration Act. The CEO of Salesforce, the billion-dollar tech company, did as well, Marc Benioff saying he would halt plans to expand into the state. Angie's List announced it, too, was canceling a $40 million expansion of its Indianapolis headquarters, a move that was to add 1,000 jobs.
NEWS
March 26, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
DURING HIS first moments as a free man in nearly 45 years, Clarence Safwat Davis was thinking about groceries. Specifically, about whether his family needed to pick up bread and milk on the drive home to Tioga from the state correctional institution at Graterford. "It's something that's part of our normal flow as a family, something we always do and ask about," Davis, 64, said the other day, a few weeks after that January night. "I didn't want to miss that step. I really just wanted to pick up where we had left off. " But his first thought, even before pantry staples, was how surreal it felt to be able to do whatever he wanted for the first time since he was 20 years old. "I hoped that no one would come along and pinch me and wake me up from this dream," he said.
SPORTS
March 18, 2015 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Freedoms retained three of their four players from last season's playoff team Monday in the World TeamTennis draft. "We wanted to maintain our continuity," team owner Billie Jean King said in a teleconference with reporters. "The chemistry from last year was so good that we really didn't want to mess it up. And I think it is going to be even stronger because we don't have to go through the preliminary introductions of getting to know each other again. " Last season marked the Freedoms' first playoff appearance since 2007.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
PATCO riders will soon be able to use their Freedom cards to pay fares on SEPTA subways and buses, PATCO and SEPTA officials said Wednesday. However, SEPTA-issued smart cards won't work on PATCO. After SEPTA switches to its long-awaited electronic "smart card" fare-payment system this year, PATCO cards will be compatible with the SEPTA Key system, PATCO general manager John Rink said. One caveat: A PATCO card must be registered with PATCO. That registration will permit SEPTA to identify the user and bill PATCO for the trip, Rink said.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | BY BENEDICTE CLOUET
WHETHER YOU agree with Charlie Hebdo 's editorial line - or whether, until Wednesday, you'd even heard the name - is not the point. When armed terrorists burst into the office of the satirical French weekly famous for its irreverence and killed 12 people, they assassinated some of France's greatest cartoonists: Cabu, Wolinski, Charb and Tignous. These are household names in my country. They were people I grew up reading, people who all their life fought for the freedom of expression and their right to use it for satirical purposes, people who are now being mourned in France and beyond for what they represented.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
YESTERDAY, CLARENCE DAVIS received the best news he'd heard in 40 years. After waging a legal battle over what he claimed was false testimony and a botched prosecution in a 1970 murder case, Davis, 63, was granted parole by a Philadelphia Common Pleas judge after negotiating a new guilty plea. Initially convicted of robbery and first-degree murder, Davis' new deal had him plead to third-degree murder, robbery and firearms offenses, and sealed his release from the state Correctional Institution at Graterford.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Civil War ended, the constitutional amendments abolishing slavery and establishing civil and legal humanity of African Americans passed - a new day dawned in 19th-century America. Meet the new day, same as the old day. Reconstruction ended in 1877, blacks were disenfranchised, the Supreme Court gave its imprimatur to segregation in 1896; a half-century passed before civil rights dominated the national stage again. Mostly this story is told as it unfolded in the South. But what of the North?
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