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NEWS
December 24, 2003
AT A TIME when most of us are busily preparing for Christmas, let us remember and thank our troops fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan. To those who protected our freedom in World War II, thank you. To those who fought in Korea and Vietnam, thank you. To those who fought in the Gulf War, thank you. And to those firefighters and police officers in New York, the ones who head into a burning building as we are heading out, and lost their...
NEWS
January 19, 1986
South African Bishop Desmond Tutu, who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984 for his leadership of nonviolent opposition to apartheid, paid a hectic two- day visit to Philadelphia last week. At packed assemblies around the city, he called for divestment of South Africa-related stocks, thanked American supporters and vowed that efforts to end white-minority domination would continue. "Freedom is coming," he said.
NEWS
July 17, 2006
WHEN THIS great country was in its infancy, I don't believe that our forefathers envisioned freedom of religion to include religions or cults that sanction the killing of non-believers. Can someone from please explain exactly what constitutes a religion verses a cult, and just exactly what religions are recognized as legitimate religions per the Constitution? If the killing of innocent people is considered a crime, why do politicians turn a blind eye toward literature that specifically sanctions the killing of non-believers?
NEWS
June 30, 2006 | Brian P. Tierney
FOR TOO MANY years, newspaper ownership in this country has increasingly been concentrated in the hands of a few large companies. Newspaper traditionalists have been mourning the loss of individual community character, as well as spirited personality, in their hometown papers. The industry has been resigned to a fate of bland, generic corporatization, and concepts like family or local stewardship were as quaint as hot-lead type. The trend has seemed so inevitable, so relentless, and so unstoppable that even giants like Times Mirror and Knight Ridder have succumbed to the same family squabbles and Wall Street pressure that swallowed up great newspapers from Louisville to Des Moines to Los Angeles to Boston.
NEWS
July 5, 2008 | SOLOMON JONES
YESTERDAY was Independence Day - the day America told Britain to go fly a kite. Because our country's founders had the foresight to make that bold move, we now have the freedom to barbecue and go to clearance sales on every major holiday. I, along with my family and friends, will be enjoying each of these freedoms this holiday weekend. However, we'll be making a few minor adjustments to our usual Independence Day celebration due to the economic slowdown. We won't be throwing any steaks on the grill.
NEWS
October 29, 1987
One paragraph deep in yesterday's account of the disgruntled investor who blew away the manager of a Merrill Lynch office in Miami stood out: "About 10 a.m. Katz left the brokerage house and drove his 1986 Pontiac Fiero sports car to the Tamiami Gun Shop South on Dixie Highway. He used a credit card to purchase the .357 (magnum revolver) for $300 to $400 . . . . " Whatever drove Arthur H. Katz to murder the branch manager, shoot his broker and then kill himself, Florida's super-lenient gun law should be credited with an assist.
NEWS
January 13, 1987
The word from South Africa is bad. The state of emergency has been intensified. Press censorship has become more severe. Black education groups are not permitted to hold meetings. The imprisonment of dissenters continues. People continue to be killed, and bordering African nations live in constant fear of attack. Some observers think this deterioration of conditions is evidence of the failure of U.S. economic sanctions. But those who want to reinvest U.S. dollars - in the wake of increased South African trade with Israel, Japan, Taiwan, South Korea, Switzerland and South America - are dead wrong.
NEWS
July 17, 1993 | Inquirer photographs by April Saul
Protesters gathered outside City Hall yesterday to begin a 24-hour fast demanding the release of political prisoners in Vietnam. The Movement for Freedom and Democracy in Vietnam is organizing the demonstration.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | By DAVID KAIRYS
Somehow we can't seem to get straight what we mean by freedom. Everybody's for it. But why is a refusal to honor the flag an exercise of freedom to some and a desecration of freedom to others? The answer lies in divergent visions of freedom throughout our history, and in the reemergence in recent years of an old, repressive tradition with a new face. As in the past, the flag has become a central focus of the current debate - in the presidential campaign, in the furor over its use in a Chicago art exhibit and in a case now before the Supreme Court involving a Texas law making it a crime to destroy or deface the flag in circumstances upsetting to others.
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BUSINESS
April 17, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
Freedom Mortgage Corp., of Mount Laurel, agreed to pay $113 million to settle allegations that from 2006 through 2011 it certified hundreds of mortgages for Federal Housing Administration insurance that did not qualify, Paul J. Fishman, the U.S. attorney for the District of New Jersey, said Friday. Mortgage companies authorized to certify home loans for the federal loan insurance - designed for borrowers who cannot afford a large down payment - are required to monitor loans for defaults within the first six months.
NEWS
April 16, 2016
By Andy Koenig When are you done paying your taxes? No, the answer isn't April 18 - taxes are just due on that day. Pennsylvanians finish paying them on April 22, and New Jerseyans finish on May 12. That's when you finally earn enough to pay what you'll owe for 2016. Put another way: You work well over 100 days this year before you actually start to see your hard-earned money. The nonpartisan Tax Foundation calls this "Tax Freedom Day," although you probably won't feel like celebrating when you consider that you're likely spending more on taxes than on food, clothing, and housing combined.
NEWS
April 12, 2016
ISSUE | DISCRIMINATION Law of oppression, not freedom The Christian values of tolerance, mercy, and charity died in Mississippi Tuesday with Gov. Phil Bryant's signing of an antigay religious freedom bill ("Mississippi gov. signs law allowing service denial to gays," Philly.com, Tuesday). How long before similar laws allow people to not provide services or do business with Muslims, Buddhists, Hindus, or Jews and allow employers to fire such individuals or refuse them employment?
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
University scholars who work under threat in countries that suppress academic freedom will be offered "safe haven" through a new endowment established in honor of Beau Biden, late son of the vice president. The $1 million gift, from an anonymous donor, will pay for one scholar each year to move to an American university and work free from danger. The Institute of International Education announced the gift Friday afternoon at a news conference at the University of Delaware's campus in Wilmington.
NEWS
April 2, 2016
ISSUE | CRIMINAL JUSTICE Worthy of release Since the Supreme Court's decision banning automatic life-without-parole sentences for juveniles, the Inquirer has profiled several affected inmates. Earl Rice Jr.'s story is only one that demonstrates how some men have used their time in prison to reform their lives ("After 43 years, hoping for a second chance," Monday). Rice's accomplishments are impressive: earning a diploma, training as a plumber and a butcher, volunteering to help young people, and serving as a positive influence on his children and grandchildren.
NEWS
March 29, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
AT AGE 60, Earl Rice Jr. is living for the future. "I train myself to get up at 4 every morning," he said, "just so when I go home, I'll be up before the sun rises and ready to go. " Rice has served 43 years toward a life sentence at Graterford state prison for a purse-snatching gone wrong at age 17. Now, for the first time, he has a chance at release. "There's a lot of people I want to spend time with and things I want to do," said Rice, now a great-grandfather. There's a trip to Disney World with his daughter that's decades overdue.
NEWS
March 28, 2016
Numerous organizations and individuals supported the Underground Railroad. The daring escape of Henry "Box" Brown relied on the help of an unlikely ally: the mail. Born in the early 1800s at a plantation near Yanceyville, Va., Brown was sent to Richmond at age 15 to work on a tobacco farm. He married Nancy, a slave owned by a different master, and the couple had three children and were expecting their fourth when Nancy was sent to work in North Carolina. Brown stood powerless as his pregnant wife and children shuffled past in a coffle gang.
NEWS
February 24, 2016
By Amanda Schnetzer and William Inboden Seventy-five years ago, in his landmark "Four Freedoms" speech, President Franklin D. Roosevelt warned Congress that "at no previous time has American security been as seriously threatened from without as it is today. " The United States had not yet entered World War II, and Japan's surprise attack on Pearl Harbor still loomed ahead. Yet Roosevelt's speech redefined America's role in the world by intertwining our national security with the fight against tyranny beyond our shores.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2016
In any other place, the enterprise that James Samaha, 50, heads would be considered a big company: 5,500 to 6,000 employees, two million customers in 500 towns in three states, 160 service depots, multiple call centers and warehouses. But not here, where the division for which Samaha is senior vice president, the Freedom Region, is dwarfed by the presence of its parent, Comcast, in Philadelphia. What's it like to work in the shadow of corporate headquarters with such top executives as Brian Roberts and David Cohen looking over your shoulder?
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