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Freedom Of Choice Act

NEWS
December 8, 1992 | By Karen Schneider, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A group of newly elected female House members said yesterday that they would fight to strengthen laws prohibiting sexual harassment in Congress. "We as leaders must make sure that sexual harassment is addressed in Congress," said Rep.-elect Deborah Pryce (R., Ohio). "We must set an example for the rest of America. " The women were organized by Rep.-elect Marjorie Margolies-Mezvinsky, the Democrat from Montgomery County who will represent Pennsylvania's 13th District. Their attention to the issue of sexual harassment stems from recent allegations that Sen. Bob Packwood (R., Ore.)
NEWS
December 2, 1992
The U.S. Supreme Court's refusal to hear an appeal on a Guam law prohibiting most abortions signals a change in the legal battlefield. Along with the election of a pro-choice president, the Supreme Court's action means abortion won't be outlawed outright - at least in the near future. At the same time, the court may let abortion become more difficult - even impossible - to get. So the fight isn't over. Rather, it's turned into a series of smaller fights. The court's June decision on the Pennsylvania abortion law guarantees that women in different states will have to run various gantlets - permissions and waiting periods and protesters blocking the door - before they can get an abortion.
NEWS
October 8, 1992 | By Paul J. Lim, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Behind in the polls with less than a month to go, Democratic Senate nominee Lynn Yeakel reminded a small Huntingdon Valley gathering this week that it was only a year ago that Harris Wofford orchestrated a dramatic come-from-behind victory to land a seat in the Senate. In a 30-minute appearance Monday evening before a predominantly Republican audience at Gloria Dei Church, Yeakel said her opponent, U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter, was running a negative campaign. She also tried to pin blame for the state's economic downturn on him. But as often as she attacked Specter, the Democratic nominee evoked the name of Wofford, in an attempt to draft off the freshman senator's statewide appeal after his stunning upset of Dick Thornburg last year.
NEWS
November 11, 1992 | By Karen Schneider, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
It was trust versus change. Change won, and since Election Day, change - silly and significant - has been roaring through this town. Suits are sprouting saxophone lapel pins. Restaurants have added Arkansas stew to their menus, and Arkansas spring water to wash it down. Whodunits by Walter Mosley, Bill Clinton's favorite mystery writer, are selling like chicken enchiladas, Clinton's favorite food. Will Chelsea attend public or private school? Will the first couple share a bedroom or have separate ones?
NEWS
November 30, 1992 | BY CAL THOMAS
Republican Paul Coverdell's victory over incumbent Wyche Fowler in the Georgia Senate race provided a much-needed boost in what has been a disastrous political year for the GOP. The solace Republicans take from Coverdell's victory can be compared to visiting the lawyer's office when the head of the family's will is read. The grief at the loss remains, but there is considerable consolation that the deceased has left a large fortune to his heirs. When Harris Wofford defeated Republican Dick Thornburgh in a special Pennsylvania Senate election last year, pundits touted it as a warning sign of the Republican Party's weakness and the growing strength of Democrats.
NEWS
November 10, 1992
What a difference a day (Election Day) makes. While not all abortion rights had been eliminated under the administrations of Ronald Reagan and George Bush, you could see the Finish Line. Now there is a pro-choice president-elect, who achieved his new status in no small measure from the votes of women outraged at the Republican-supported threat to privacy and choice. And many of the changes predicted for the first few days of a Bill Clinton administration have to do with abortion rights.
NEWS
March 5, 1992 | By Karen Schneider, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Abortion-rights supporters in Congress yesterday pushed forward their campaign to pass a bill that would preserve a woman's right to choose abortion if the Supreme Court erodes or overturns Roe v. Wade, its 1973 ruling legalizing abortion. The lawmakers are preparing for an election-year showdown with President Bush, who on Tuesday vowed that the bill "will not become law as long as I am President. " Democrats predict they can pass the abortion-rights bill and use Bush's threatened veto against him on the campaign trail.
NEWS
June 24, 1992 | By Charles Green, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
In the opening round of the summer's bitter fight over abortion, President Bush yesterday vetoed a bill that would have greatly expanded the use of tissues from aborted fetuses for medical research and experimental treatments of diseases. "I believe this moratorium is important in order to prevent taxpayer funds from being used for research that many Americans find morally repugnant and because of its potential for promoting and legitimatizing abortion," Bush said. A bid by the House to override the veto was expected to fail, probably today.
NEWS
February 3, 1992 | By Karen Schneider, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU Charles Green of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
When House Speaker Thomas S. Foley surprised Americans last week by declaring that Democrats "will fight for a woman's right to choose," he virtually assured that abortion would emerge as one of the most contentious battles in Congress this year. "If the Supreme Court removes the guarantee of choice from the Constitution, Congress will write it into the laws of the United States," Foley (D., Wash.) said in his rebuttal to President Bush's State of the Union speech. Abortion-rights activists say the Supreme Court's decision to review a Pennsylvania abortion law - as well as presidential politics - will ensure that abortion legislation is debated in Congress and on the campaign trail.
NEWS
May 26, 1992 | by Nicole Weisensee, Special to the Daily News
After most primary-election party fights, the winners and losers try to work out their differences and present a united front for the general election. That is what U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., attempted recently with primary foe state Rep. Stephen Freind and his anti-abortion supporters. First, Specter and Freind had a private breakfast meeting two weeks ago, at which Specter sought Freind's support. Then, last week, Specter invited about 30 of Freind's supporters to Washington for a rendezvous that included Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C.
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