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Freedom Riders

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NEWS
July 22, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The anger that led Lewis Zuchman and Luvaghn Brown to self-destructive moments as teenagers ultimately fueled their dedication to a movement. Zuchman grew up white and Jewish in New York. He quit college and served time in jail before he was 19. Brown, an African American in segregated Mississippi, ran away from an abusive family life and was prone to raise his fists in an instant. They met as teenage Freedom Riders in the early 1960s, part of a historic nonviolent movement that helped force the desegregation of transportation services in the South.
NEWS
July 17, 1988 | By Doreen Carvajal, Inquirer Convention Bureau
It's a long road from a perilous freedom ride to the rainbow ride in the air-conditioned, climate-controlled ship of the highway that carried Jesse Jackson to Atlanta. Freedom riders traveled on stifling buses that were set on fire and attacked by Southern mobs. Jackson rode aboard a bus with two television sets, a shower, fold-out beds, paneling, swivel chairs, sofas and a videocassette recorder set to play The Wiz. Still, the goals of the freedom riders endured last week on Jackson's comfortable bus as it rumbled south past cornfields, rambling Midwestern truck farms and vegetable patches - and to Atlanta yesterday.
NEWS
August 5, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / JOHN COSTELLO
After the week-long 1997 Freedom Riders tour, Lincoln University professor Lentrell Crittenden (left) hugs Ursinus professor William Akin. Eighteen area residents joined the tour of civil-rights landmarks in the South.
NEWS
July 29, 1989 | ANDREA MIHALIK/DAILY NEWS
Local students hold hands around the Liberty Bell yesterday upon their return to town following their "Freedom Ride" to Alabama. The Freedom Riders - aged 14-21 - visitied Selma, Montgomery and Birmingham in a program sponsored by the Martin Luther King Jr. Association for Nonviolence.
NEWS
June 20, 1989 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / REBECCA BARGER
A caravan of 13 buses left Philadelphia's JFK Stadium yesterday, carrying about 500 latter-day freedom riders to Mississippi in memory of three civil rights workers slain there a quarter-century ago. Mayor Goode plans to join them for observances in Philadelphia, Miss., tomorrow, the anniversary of the 1964 deaths of James Earl Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner at the hands of a deputy sheriff and a group of Ku Klux Klan members.
NEWS
July 22, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The anger that led Lewis Zuchman and Luvaughn Brown to self-destructive moments as teenagers ultimately fueled their dedication to a movement. Zuchman grew up white and Jewish in New York. He quit college and served time in jail before he was 19. Brown, an African-American in segregated Mississippi, ran away from an abusive family life and was prone to raise his fists in an instant. They met as teenage Freedom Riders in the early 1960s, part of an historic non-violent movement that helped force the desegregation of the transportation facilities in the South.
NEWS
August 5, 1997 | STEVEN M. FALK/ DAILY NEWS
Mayor Rendell reads a proclamation to members of the Martin Luther King Freedom Ride yesterday at the Liberty Bell. The group was returning from a week-long tour of historic civil rights sites and a meeting with some of the original Freedom Riders from the '60s civil rights movement. Stops included a visit to the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis and The 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, where four young girls were killed in a bombing.
NEWS
June 2, 1998 | By Herbert Lowe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They prayed yesterday at the Liberty Bell. Then the 75 supporters of the National Welfare Rights Union marched to the abandoned Schmidt's Brewery, where they condemned the government for what they called economic and human rights violations. "I am here to testify about . . . every human being [being denied] the right to a standard of living that protects the health and well-being of their family," Edna Winters said during a mock tribunal. After the trial, Winters and 46 others boarded a chartered bus to begin a month-long tour of America's poor communities.
NEWS
August 12, 1999 | by Shantee Woodards, Daily News Staff Writer
Aliya Williams can remember her grandparents telling her stories about the days before the civil rights movement, when black people couldn't drink out of the same water fountains as whites and had separate entrances to restaurants. "It was horrible," said Aliya, 15. This week, Aliya is revisiting those days during a 10-day Freedom Ride with about 20 other high school and college students. The Philadelphia Martin Luther King Jr. Association for Nonviolence sponsored the tour.
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NEWS
September 2, 2015
On Finch evolution I have heard the complaints about Go Set a Watchman from friends who read (or gave up reading) the book. But so far, I like it very much - not just because Harper Lee's storytelling skills are so darn good, but also because it's an uncomfortable story ("Book offers fuller portrait of Atticus Finch," Thursday). It brought back a line of my dad's in the '60s, when he supported the Freedom Riders and my mom didn't. When I said my heroes were Jackie Robinson and the Kennedys, he said, "Good men to look up to . . . but that doesn't mean you understand what it feels like to stand up against injustice until you do it. " We'll be judged as a nation by whether we overcome racism, and after the past two summers, I'm beginning to think we won't until we all look like Tiger Woods and share his multiracial background.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | Valerie Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
BERNARD Lafayette Jr. wasn't portrayed in the movie "Selma," about the historic marches across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in 1965 to seek voting rights for African-American citizens. Yet history shows that the young activists of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) wouldn't have been in Selma if not for Lafayette. Lafayette, who spent part of his childhood in Philadelphia, was a college roommate of former SNCC activist Congressman John R. Lewis (D-Ga.) at American Baptist College, in Nashville, Tenn.
NEWS
October 31, 2014 | BY ALIYA Z. KHABIR
EVERY YEAR the air gets crisp and the leaves change color, and I get suckered into the same debate: Should Muslims living in the United States exercise their right to vote, although the U.S. is not an Islamic state? This topic is passionately discussed in the Islamic community, with both sides claiming to have Sunnah (practice and traditions of the Prophet Muhammad, peace and blessing upon him) in support of their stance. For Muslims living in America, voting is not only permissible but, in our present state, also becomes wajib (obligatory)
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
A few words on the death of Elwin Wilson. He passed last week in a South Carolina hospital at age 76. Wilson had endured heart and lung problems and had suffered a recent bout with the flu. There is little reason you would know his name, but as a young man, Wilson made a virtual career out of hatefulness. He was a Klan supporter who burned crosses, hanged a black doll in a noose, once flung a jack handle at an African American boy. In 1961, he was among a group of men who attacked a busload of Freedom Riders at a station in Rock Hill, S.C. Wilson's passing coincides with a significant anniversary: 50 years ago this week, 65 "Negroes" set out from Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., and seated themselves at the lunch counters of five department stores.
NEWS
July 22, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The anger that led Lewis Zuchman and Luvaughn Brown to self-destructive moments as teenagers ultimately fueled their dedication to a movement. Zuchman grew up white and Jewish in New York. He quit college and served time in jail before he was 19. Brown, an African-American in segregated Mississippi, ran away from an abusive family life and was prone to raise his fists in an instant. They met as teenage Freedom Riders in the early 1960s, part of an historic non-violent movement that helped force the desegregation of the transportation facilities in the South.
NEWS
July 22, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The anger that led Lewis Zuchman and Luvaghn Brown to self-destructive moments as teenagers ultimately fueled their dedication to a movement. Zuchman grew up white and Jewish in New York. He quit college and served time in jail before he was 19. Brown, an African American in segregated Mississippi, ran away from an abusive family life and was prone to raise his fists in an instant. They met as teenage Freedom Riders in the early 1960s, part of a historic nonviolent movement that helped force the desegregation of transportation services in the South.
NEWS
November 4, 2011
OCCUPY THIS! Seize that! Raise your voices, capture the moment, up with the 99 percent! It's an exciting time for exclamation marks and hyperbole. The country's attention has been captured by citizens' movements, from the tea- party followers with their anger at Big Government to the Occupy Wall Streeters with their equally impassioned aversion to Big Corporations. It's actually nice to see some old-style populist engagement after years of pampered apathy. But, much as I love my own country and its proud history of activism - from the Colonists to the Freedom Riders - I can't help but think how these current protesters pale in comparison with their brothers and sisters overseas.
NEWS
January 14, 2011 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The minister standing in the living room of the big white house on Jackson Street more than 50 years ago was the man that people in Montgomery, Ala., were talking about. That much Cathrine Williams, then 11, knew. And she remembers, too, the hug that the man - the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. - gave her. "He was so nice. I remember he patted us on the head," said Williams. "His wife came down the hallway, and she was carrying a baby. " Wearing a sparkling Barack Obama T-shirt Thursday, Williams - now 65 and a teacher at the Magic Cottage Preschool in Lower Makefield - connected the dots for her young audience: The events of her childhood in Montgomery, a center of the civil rights movement, ultimately led to the election of the 44th president of the United States.
NEWS
September 12, 2010 | By Daniel R. Biddle and Murray Dubin
Their speeches rang with names of battles where black soldiers had died for the Union. Their petitions swelled with testimony from wives and mothers brutalized for trying to ride streetcars to visit loved ones in Army hospitals. But the drive by black activists and their white allies to integrate those horse-drawn cars had been sabotaged and stalled in Harrisburg in 1865. So their fledgling group, the Equal Rights League, sent a new colored lobbyist from Philadelphia to climb the Capitol's marble steps.
NEWS
August 29, 2010
A few words about who "we" is. "This is a moment," said Glenn Beck three months ago on his radio program, "... that I think we 'reclaim' the civil rights movement. It has been so distorted and so turned upside down. ... We are on the right side of history. We are on the side of individual freedoms and liberties and damn it, we will reclaim the civil rights moment. We will take that movement, because we were the people that did it in the first place!" Beck was promoting his "Restoring Honor" rally, held this weekend at the Lincoln Memorial, 47 years to the day after the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. famously spoke there.
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