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French Alps

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NEWS
March 27, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
LAST NIGHT, people in Philly, Virginia, Washington, D.C., and beyond mourned the deaths of Emily and Yvonne Selke. The Drexel University alumna and her mother were two of the 150 passengers killed in a plane crash in the French Alps on Tuesday, according to a statement from the Selke family. The statement described them as "two wonderful, caring, amazing people who meant so much to so many," adding: "At this difficult time, we respectfully ask for privacy and your prayers. " The women, natives of Nokesville, Va., died when the Germanwings airliner crashed en route to Dusseldorf, Germany.
NEWS
February 18, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
John P. Bodnar, 88, of Collegeville, a retired Marine sergeant major whose ordeals during World War II earned him a Silver Star and the French Legion of Honor, died of heart failure Monday, Feb. 14, at the Veterans Affairs Hospital in Coatesville. After graduating from Coatesville High School, Mr. Bodnar spent the summer as a swimming and athletics instructor at a camp before enlisting in the Marines in September 1940. In the early days of the war, he was a parachute instructor at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina.
SPORTS
July 27, 2006 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
EVIAN, France - Michelle Wie knows it's tough keeping up with the best men in the game. In the French Alps yesterday, she learned that beating golf's top female money winner this season, Mexico's Lorena Ochoa, won't be much easier. Ochoa, Mi Hyun Kim and Shani Waugh shot 6-under-par 66s at Evian Golf Club to lead after the first round of the Evian Masters, with temperatures reaching 91 degrees. A year ago, Ochoa was the runner-up with Wie here when Paula Creamer won. Creamer opened this time with a 70. Karrie Webb was a shot behind after a 67, with Maria Hjorth, Laura Davies and Se Ri Pak in at 68. Wie had a 69, and was tied with Annika Sorenstam and four others.
FOOD
August 23, 2012
A Taste of Alpine Vermont Though it is inspired by the Savoie wonder of French Beaufort, the cheese from Thistle Hill Farm in North Pomfret, Vt., known as Tarentaise is very much an American original. For one thing, very few U.S. makers had even remotely begun to master the difficult mountain variations of Gruyère by the time, 13 years ago, that John and Janine Putnam went to understudy in the French Alps and then purchased the special copper vat to make the cheese back home. And what they created is as much a reflection of their own farm's terroir - especially the clover- and orchard-grass-covered pastures that enrich the organic raw milk of their Jersey herd - as it is the traditional European technique.
NEWS
December 16, 2012
Maurice Herzog, 93, the first man to climb a 26,5454-foot Himalayan peak despite losing all his fingers and toes to frostbite, died Friday. The mountaineer, who went on to scale the heights of French politics, became a household name after his 1950 Annapurna climb. A statement from the Elysee Presidential Palace said he died in France, but it gave no further details. He had lived just outside Paris. A photograph of Mr. Herzog waving a French tricolor atop the peak in Nepal captured a seminal moment before the grueling descent, during which subzero conditions led to the amputation of all his fingers and toes.
NEWS
January 19, 2002 | By THERESA CONROY conroyt@phillynews.com Daily News reporter Gloria Campisi contributed to this story
During a four-hour rescue from a mountain in the French Alps, Philadelphian Matthew Gimbl - who had fallen head-first into a crevasse while skiing Sunday - remained conscious, telling his rescuers that he wanted to live. But just moments before he was pulled to safety, the 21-year-old died. "His general state worsened," said Gorge Cardoso, from the ski resort's emergency station. "About 10 minutes before [he was freed] . . . his heart stopped. They performed heart massage, mouth-to-mouth.
NEWS
July 25, 2006
Floyd Landis' bicycle journey, from the rolling hills of Lancaster County to the French Alps to the Champs-Elysees in Paris, is one of the most inspirational stories of the year in sports. Landis, 30, won the Tour de France on Sunday, overcoming a chronic hip ailment that will require joint-replacement surgery next month. Injured in a crash three years ago, Landis suffers from the same debilitating condition - loss of blood supply to the hip bone - that affects at least 10,000 Americans annually.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2008 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Filled with breathtaking shots of crazed nutballs on skis plummeting down pitched peaks at high speed, Steep is a visually exhilarating sports documentary that is also more than a little exasperating. These guys (all but one of the "extreme skiers" featured in Mark Obenhaus' film are men) talk about what they're doing - getting to the trickiest, remotest patches of the Alps, the Rockies or wherever and then zooming groundward - as though there is nothing more meaningful, more profound, more enlightening, for a human being to do. As hugely skilled and fearless as these skiers are, they're huge with self-importance and hyperbole, too. But those are the interviews.
NEWS
July 13, 2012 | By John Heilprin and Angela Charlton, Associated Press
CHAMONIX, France - A climber trying to scale Mont Blanc may accidentally have caused a slab of ice to snap off Thursday high in the French Alps, sparking an avalanche that swept nine European climbers to their deaths, authorities said. A dozen climbers were injured, and two were still missing by nightfall. As a sheet of snow and ice thundered down the steep slope, several other climbers managed to turn away from the slide in time, regional authorities in Haute-Savoie said. Two climbers were rescued as emergency crews using dogs and helicopters scoured the churned-up, high-altitude area in a frantic search for the missing.
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NEWS
January 15, 2016
ITALY Immigrant held in American's death A Senegalese immigrant was detained Wednesday in the strangulation death of a 35-year-old American woman, just hours after crime scene investigators returned to her Florence apartment to search for clues identifying her killer. Ashley Olsen, originally from Summer Haven, Fla., was found nude on her bed in her rented apartment on Saturday after her boyfriend had the owner open the door. The body had bruises and scratches on the neck, and an autopsy determined that she had been strangled with a cord or rope.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
LAST NIGHT, people in Philly, Virginia, Washington, D.C., and beyond mourned the deaths of Emily and Yvonne Selke. The Drexel University alumna and her mother were two of the 150 passengers killed in a plane crash in the French Alps on Tuesday, according to a statement from the Selke family. The statement described them as "two wonderful, caring, amazing people who meant so much to so many," adding: "At this difficult time, we respectfully ask for privacy and your prayers. " The women, natives of Nokesville, Va., died when the Germanwings airliner crashed en route to Dusseldorf, Germany.
NEWS
August 17, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
João M. Cardoso, 76, of Glenside, a Chestnut Hill Academy foreign-language teacher for 29 years, died Monday, Aug. 5, at home of pancreatic cancer. Born on the tiny island of Faial, in Portugal's Azores, he was a mediocre student who struggled with stuttering. At age 14, his mother sent him to a Seventh-day Adventist boarding school on the Portuguese mainland. The experience gave him an insatiable wanderlust, his family said. In the mid-1950s, Mr. Cardoso served in the Portuguese army artillery, where he attained the rank of corporal.
NEWS
December 16, 2012
Maurice Herzog, 93, the first man to climb a 26,5454-foot Himalayan peak despite losing all his fingers and toes to frostbite, died Friday. The mountaineer, who went on to scale the heights of French politics, became a household name after his 1950 Annapurna climb. A statement from the Elysee Presidential Palace said he died in France, but it gave no further details. He had lived just outside Paris. A photograph of Mr. Herzog waving a French tricolor atop the peak in Nepal captured a seminal moment before the grueling descent, during which subzero conditions led to the amputation of all his fingers and toes.
NEWS
September 11, 2012 | Associated Press
LONDON - Police searched for a second day at the U.K. home of a British-Iraqi couple killed along with two other people while vacationing in the French Alps. The search of Saad and Iqbal al-Hilli's home in the village of Claygate, a London suburb, is part of a French-led investigation into the case. The couple and the two other people were each shot twice in the head. The couple's two young daughters survived, with one in a medically-induced coma for her wounds. A bomb squad made a brief appearance at the suburban home as investigators on Monday kept searching for clues to the brutal killing.
FOOD
August 23, 2012
A Taste of Alpine Vermont Though it is inspired by the Savoie wonder of French Beaufort, the cheese from Thistle Hill Farm in North Pomfret, Vt., known as Tarentaise is very much an American original. For one thing, very few U.S. makers had even remotely begun to master the difficult mountain variations of Gruyère by the time, 13 years ago, that John and Janine Putnam went to understudy in the French Alps and then purchased the special copper vat to make the cheese back home. And what they created is as much a reflection of their own farm's terroir - especially the clover- and orchard-grass-covered pastures that enrich the organic raw milk of their Jersey herd - as it is the traditional European technique.
NEWS
July 13, 2012 | By John Heilprin and Angela Charlton, Associated Press
CHAMONIX, France - A climber trying to scale Mont Blanc may accidentally have caused a slab of ice to snap off Thursday high in the French Alps, sparking an avalanche that swept nine European climbers to their deaths, authorities said. A dozen climbers were injured, and two were still missing by nightfall. As a sheet of snow and ice thundered down the steep slope, several other climbers managed to turn away from the slide in time, regional authorities in Haute-Savoie said. Two climbers were rescued as emergency crews using dogs and helicopters scoured the churned-up, high-altitude area in a frantic search for the missing.
NEWS
April 11, 2011 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
WHEN IT COMES to scientific disciplines, studying avalanches would be hard to categorize.' But that was Nicholas DiGiacomo's favorite preoccupation. And he was in the perfect place to observe the scary phenomenon - the mountains of Colorado. Nick, whose day jobs involved nuclear physics, antimatter, particle colliders and his service as a science adviser to President Ronald Reagan, died March 9 of complications of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's Disease). He was 58 and lived in Telluride, Colo.
NEWS
February 18, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
John P. Bodnar, 88, of Collegeville, a retired Marine sergeant major whose ordeals during World War II earned him a Silver Star and the French Legion of Honor, died of heart failure Monday, Feb. 14, at the Veterans Affairs Hospital in Coatesville. After graduating from Coatesville High School, Mr. Bodnar spent the summer as a swimming and athletics instructor at a camp before enlisting in the Marines in September 1940. In the early days of the war, he was a parachute instructor at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina.
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