CollectionsFrench Onion Soup
IN THE NEWS

French Onion Soup

FIND MORE STORIES »
FEATURED ARTICLES
FOOD
January 17, 2013 | By David Hagedorn, Washington Post
Few things are more promising than a piping-hot bowl of French onion soup placed before you on a brisk day, its fragrant liquid beneath a toasted raft topped with golden cheese that will soon be stringing from your mouth. How frustrating, then, to discover something skimpy, with bready mush and pale onions, devoid of flavor. Having been subjected to three such disappointing examples at restaurants in the fall, I decided to work through what it takes to make a soul-satisfying version.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1993 | By Rachel Paula Klein, FOR THE INQUIRER
I've been going to restaurants since I was very little. At every restaurant I go to, I like to get crayons or something to keep me busy while I wait for my food. Some of my favorite restaurants are Italian Oven, Bennigan's and Olga's Kitchen. My sister (Lindsay, age 5) likes Friendly's, Ground Round and Applebee's. There are other places we like, but I can't name them all. When kids go to restaurants, there is one thing all kids hate. Kids HATE waiting 20 minutes for their food.
FOOD
March 13, 1996 | by Gar Joseph, Daily News Staff Writer
Fingers is a place where the diners order Manhattans before dinner. It's a place that makes its own cheesecake, but offers only two bottles on the wine list. It's a place devoid of chrome or leather or fluorescent light. It has a very nice piano bar that features jazz on Friday nights. In short, it's a place that was completely untouched by the Philadelphia restaurant renaissance of the 1970s and '80s. It's also a place that's been doing business at the same downtown Erdenheim location for a couple of decades.
NEWS
July 15, 1990 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sophisticated splendors of French-Thai cuisine at Alisa Cafe easily put this tiny Upper Darby place on my Top 10 restaurant list. Owner-chef Tony Kanjanakorn presides over an exquisite jewel box where dishes made with high-quality ingredients are graced with elegant, subtly prepared sauces. Although Alisa is not widely known, its 46 seats are filled nearly every night, so plan ahead. Appetizers were incomparable. Thin slices of rare beef ($6.95) so tender they could be cut with a feather were nicely charred on the outside, then sprinkled with chopped scallions and bathed in an extraordinary veal reduction sparked with sesame oil, port wine and ginger that was slightly spicy and sweet, yet soothing to the palate.
NEWS
January 19, 1992 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
In these days of frugal dining, Caffe Raffaello has everything you could want - good food, modest prices and a pretty setting. The Elkins Park Square restaurant, opened two years ago by Ralph Berarducci, who also owns Portofino in Center City, retains the same Philadelphia-style decor as its unlamented predecessor, Gullifty's. The familiar setting offers lots of natural wood, a foundry's worth of gleaming brass, etched windows, hanging plants and friendly, informal service.
NEWS
March 26, 1989 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Restaurants seldom change as drastically as the Berlin restaurant now known as The Embers. Until a year ago, this was known as Chojnacki's Tavern, an informal bar- restaurant offering good Polish cuisine; today, it is an attractive dining place serving modest Italian dishes. The old barroom has been turned into quiet dining rooms, prettily decorated in contemporary gray-and-burgundy pastels. The main dining room is color- coordinated: Gray wainscoting and cream-colored wallpaper imprinted with tiny rose and gray slashes complement the rose and gray carpet.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1989 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
Although it hasn't been open long, the Walnut Hill Tavern in Germantown already has a solid sense of self. The simple menu is a model of sandwich-or-entree variety and low prices; the staff is exceptionally pleasant; the place is equally comfortable for family dining or a drink with friends; there's takeout for those who live nearby. A pianist plays in the handsome bar after 9:30 on Friday and Saturday nights. Once word gets out, crowds are sure to pile in. The three wood-paneled dining rooms have an obvious labor-of-love look.
NEWS
February 8, 1987 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Its location along busy Route 70 across from the Garden State Park is hardly romantic, but Tyrol, the beautiful new Cherry Hill restaurant, has everything your heart could want - good food, gorgeous surroundings and excellent service. Named after the famed Alpine province in Austria, Tyrol replaced Victoria Station last month, an exchange that benefits everyone who enjoys fine dining. Some of the old restaurant's decorative touches remain, notably a vaulted ceiling reminiscent of a European train shed, exposed natural wood beams and a real railroad car still used as a dining room.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Unremarkable food in an unpretentious setting are the traditional characteristics of many Jersey shore restaurants, and La Jetee is firmly in the mold. Now in its third summer season, this modest Long Beach Island restaurant offers decent dishes at moderate prices; although the decor is bizarre and the place has no liquor license, La Jetee (French for "the jetty") seems a reliable place for an acceptable but unexciting night on the town. The airy dining room is brightened by stained-glass windows that filter the afternoon sun. Round tables covered with royal blue tablecloths are set with horrible olive-green cotton napkins, captain's chairs and a bud vase of red carnations, daisies and tiny, silk powder-blue flowers.
NEWS
January 5, 1992 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it comes to Haddon West Inn, the modest Westmont neighborhood bar- restaurant, what you see is what you get. There's no pretense here; nothing fancy and no attempt at offering anything other than basic food with no fuss or muss, seemingly more designed at filling your tummy than tantalizing your palate. Although portions are relatively small, so are the prices. Cream of chicken soup ($1) was thin, lightly flavored bisque with big chunks of white meat. A crock of French onion soup ($2.50)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
January 17, 2013 | By David Hagedorn, Washington Post
Few things are more promising than a piping-hot bowl of French onion soup placed before you on a brisk day, its fragrant liquid beneath a toasted raft topped with golden cheese that will soon be stringing from your mouth. How frustrating, then, to discover something skimpy, with bready mush and pale onions, devoid of flavor. Having been subjected to three such disappointing examples at restaurants in the fall, I decided to work through what it takes to make a soul-satisfying version.
FOOD
August 18, 2011 | By Ashley Primis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The soup/sandwich combo is one that I find hard to resist. It's like the cafe version of small plates; there's no need to stress over what to order, you can have it all. Summer, I've decided (fist in the air), is no reason to give up this perfect pairing. You just need to keep things light and cool - literally. Cooking up these batches of soups, which are all meant to be served cold or at room temperature, is a snap. For their sandwich partners, I took classic flavor pairings, and pared them down for the hotter temps.
FOOD
February 3, 2011 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Downtown Wayne is getting a burst of Latin excitement from the new Matador (110 N. Wayne Ave., 610-688-6282). Matt Pressler, a Culinary Institute of America grad who worked in Scottsdale, Ariz. (La Hacienda, Marquesa) before coming home to open La Taverna and Crazy Cactus in Phoenixville, is pairing Spanish and Mexican cuisines at the former Freehouse. There are street-level and upper-level bars, and its low-lit, wood-and-wrought-iron environs have more bullfighting paintings than you can shake a red cape at. Pressler says he became enthralled with "earthy" Spanish cuisine at CIA. He decided to offer Mexican dishes (quesadillas and carne asada, for example)
NEWS
September 22, 2010 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
I don't normally use this column to advance personal causes, so feel free to opt out and check back in Sunday if you're in any way opposed to fighting pediatric cancer. I lost a young cousin to leukemia. And last year, a friend's 5-year-old son, Jake, died of brain cancer. I had already signed up to jog in Jake's name at this Sunday's Four Seasons Parkway Run & Walk benefiting cancer research at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) when I learned about a happy ending that, if shared, might inspire others to lace up, too. The 5K race and two-mile kid-friendly walk hugs a scenic route along the Ben Franklin Parkway.
NEWS
May 8, 2005 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As restaurateurs know, today is crunch time. For some, Mother's Day might surpass even Valentine's Day on the list of the busiest days of the year for restaurants. I make that point only because Bubba's Pot Belly Stove, a Quakertown landmark that lives up to its quirky name, might not sound like the kind of place to take Mother. It might not be, unless you can picture your mother sitting in the close quarters of Bubba's log-cabin interior, complete with steer horns mounted on the walls and an old tree branch that serves as a support post in the bar. The building's rustic logs do nothing to convey a sense of brightness and light, but this is no dark, cramped tavern.
FOOD
May 7, 2000 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
The sunlight lit her topaz ring on fire as she settled in, 10 minutes after I arrived, to a seat at the metal-topped bar of La Parisienne in Ardmore. There was no space in the dining room at this bustling midday hour, so we were neighbors au comptoir, lunching at the zinc. "What's good here?" she asked me, perusing the ornately printed "carte" of classic French bistro fare. She smoothed her cashmere sweater, pulled the graying blond hair back, and, with a coiffed elegance, ordered nearly the same meal as I: French onion soup, chicken breast . . . hold the chocolate mousse.
NEWS
April 9, 2000 | By John V.R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With remarkably authentic French bistro cuisine and decor, La Parisienne in Ardmore is the next best thing to being in the City of Lights. The stunning Suburban Square bistro opened in early January in what used to be Boccie restaurant. Owners Evan Lambert and Andrew Feinstein did extensive research to make it as authentically French as possible, a goal they have reached admirably. Lambert and Feinstein are no strangers to high-quality restaurants. Their Savona in Gulph Mills is one of the jewels of suburban restaurants, while Toscana Cucina Rustica in Bryn Mawr has long been one of the region's better restaurants.
NEWS
March 10, 1999 | by Beth D'Addono, For the Daily News
Sports bars and food don't always go together. But that's not the case at Champps, the popular Marlton watering hole dominated by large screen TVs and sports memorabilia. On a recent rainy Wednesday night, the place was mobbed, which is saying something, considering that Champps can hold up to 500 hungry sports fans. Maybe the crowds were drawn by the karaoke contest planned for 9:30 p.m. - $300 in cash prizes, step right up. Whatever the reason, there was a 15-minute wait for a table, and the place was buzzing.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1998 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
Even before you're seated at Rib-It, on Grant Avenue and Roosevelt Boulevard, the smoky aroma of barbecue begins tantalizing the senses, while the sound of many mouths gnawing on ribs plays like harmony to lively chatter. This is one of several Rib-Its, which, like the others - Cherry Hill, Turnersville, Media and Camp Hill - is owned by U.S. Restaurants, a Blue Bell-based business that operates a number of food franchises, including some Burger Kings. And like the others, it's a place for rolled-up sleeves, where fingers become acceptable dining tools and often work better than the knives and forks that come wrapped in thick paper napkins.
NEWS
December 17, 1997 | by Beth D'Addono, For the Daily News
Despite its name, Loose Ends isn't the kind of restaurant that leaves anything to chance. This cozy Haddon Heights eatery, tucked into a quaint Station Avenue storefront, covers the culinary bases most capably, as my dining partner and I discovered during a recent rainy night dinner. Loose Ends, owned by Virginia Passon and her sister, chef Annemarie Phifer, is tastefully understated in its decor. Even with its current mantle of holiday finery, the decorations are festive without being overwhelming.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|