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NEWS
May 10, 1987 | By Steve Holland, United Press International
When Klaus Barbie, the alleged Nazi war criminal, goes on trial tomorrow, the real defendant promises to be the Resistance, the almost legendary refusal of Frenchmen to cave in to their German occupiers during World War II. Jacques Verges, the lawyer representing the accused "Butcher of Lyon," said in an interview that most French actually collaborated with the Germans - some passively because to do otherwise could bring denunciation, some actively...
NEWS
October 11, 1992 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Suzanne Kolojeski, 69, a Springfield, Delaware County resident who faced extraordinary danger in the French Resistance during World War II and found romance in a military hospital while recovering from imprisonment, died Friday at her home. After immigrating, Mrs. Kolojeski lived a low-key life in Springfield for more than 25 years, working as a hair stylist and occasionally as a substitute French teacher at Cardinal O'Hara High School. But before settling into those occupations and raising a family in the Philadelphia suburbs, she battled the Germans as a member of the underground in France, aiding Allied air crewmen and ground forces.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1999 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Reflecting on his role in the French Resistance, the aging Parisian tailor in Terrorists in Retirement (Des Terroristes a la Retraite) says, "I didn't do enough. " Anyone who sees Mosco Boucault's moving documentary will surely beg to differ. Terrorists in Retirement, an eloquent film devoted to Jewish members of the Resistance, launches Jewish Film Festival 19 on Saturday night at the Gershman Y, Broad and Pine Streets. The festival will offer 11 movies - all Philadelphia premieres - between this weekend and next April.
NEWS
August 29, 2004 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In the middle of a bright afternoon in August 1944, Sgt. John Bodnar found himself perched at the door of a B-17 bomber, staring down at a patch of hard alpine earth. Within seconds, he would fly out into the mountain air and plummet to a spot 400 feet below. Surviving the jump would be tough enough - it was an absurdly low altitude for parachuting out of a plane - but the mission ahead would be downright perilous. Bodnar and six other Americans were to work behind enemy lines to arm and train local pockets of the French Resistance, or Maquis, in territory crawling with almost 4,000 German troops.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
O utside the Law , an Oscar-nominated foreign film from Rachid Bouchareb, is a gripping French-Algerian coproduction that makes Algeria's epic struggle for independence from France look like a gangster movie. Bouchareb reunites his leads from the acclaimed Days of Glory (2006) . Where that film explored the contradictions of Northern Africans fighting in the French army during World War II, this one, spanning 1954 to 1962, chronicles the Algerian resistance against the French.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2010
GIMME FIVE The website metacritic.com says that so far, "The Social Network" is running fifth as the best-reviewed movie of all time. The rest of the list: 1. "The Godfather. " (1972) Francis Ford Coppola's Mafia saga. 2. "Superman II. " (1980) Christopher Reeve's second outing as the Man of Steel. 3. "Army of Shadows. " (1969) Thriller about the French Resistance. 4. "Pan's Labyrinth. " (2006) A Spanish language fantasy film directed by Guillermo del Toro. 5. "The Social Network.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2002 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Jean-Luc Godard films are grains of sand in the oyster of the moviegoer's mind: They irritate, they produce pearls. The latest film from the New Wave director who made his name in the '60s with Breathless and Contempt, In Praise of Love is an elusive and profoundly moving essay about the stages of amour and of age. Like the best of Godard's movies - and I haven't been sucked into one since Passion (1982) - it is visually ravishing, penetrating, impenetrable. The film is shot in reverse chronological order, beginning with an epiphany and ending with skepticism.
NEWS
August 9, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CANBERRA, Australia - Australian Nancy Wake, who as a spy became one the Allies' most decorated servicewomen for her role in the French Resistance during World War II, died in London Sunday, officials said yesterday. She was 98. Trained by British intelligence in espionage and sabotage, Wake helped to arm and lead 7,000 Resistance fighters in weakening German defenses before the D-Day invasion in the last months of the war. While distributing weapons, money and code books in Nazi-occupied France, she evaded capture many times and reached the top of the Gestapo's wanted list, according to her biographer, Peter FitzSimons.
NEWS
March 4, 2013
Stephane Hessel, 95, a concentration-camp survivor and member of the French Resistance whose 32-page book, Time for Outrage , became a best-seller and an inspiration for the left in Europe and the United States, died Tuesday in Paris. The book came out in 2010 as a rallying cry against the gap between rich and poor. Mr. Hessel said he wanted to imbue France's youth with the fervor of those who held out against the Nazis. Its first run was 8,000 copies. It sold millions of copies and became an inspiration for the Occupy Wall Street movement.
NEWS
August 9, 2011
Australian Nancy Wake, 98, who as a spy became one the Allies' most decorated servicewomen for her role in the French Resistance during World War II, has died in London, officials said Monday. Ms. Wake, code-named "The White Mouse" by the Gestapo, died Sunday in a nursing home, Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard said. Trained by British intelligence in espionage and sabotage, Ms. Wake helped to arm and lead 7,000 Resistance fighters in weakening German defenses before the D-Day invasion.
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NEWS
March 4, 2013
Stephane Hessel, 95, a concentration-camp survivor and member of the French Resistance whose 32-page book, Time for Outrage , became a best-seller and an inspiration for the left in Europe and the United States, died Tuesday in Paris. The book came out in 2010 as a rallying cry against the gap between rich and poor. Mr. Hessel said he wanted to imbue France's youth with the fervor of those who held out against the Nazis. Its first run was 8,000 copies. It sold millions of copies and became an inspiration for the Occupy Wall Street movement.
NEWS
November 23, 2011
Danielle Mitterrand, 87, a decorated member of the French Resistance and a combative advocate for the poor who broke the mold as first lady alongside France's first Socialist president, died Tuesday in Paris. She was hospitalized in recent days for fatigue, her France Libertés foundation said. An avowed leftist, Ms. Mitterrand turned the 14-year tenure of her husband, Francois, into her own bully pulpit - one that long outlasted him. He died of cancer less than a year after leaving office in 1995.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2011 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
You've got to hand it to Dublin's Gate Theatre and much-admired Beckett interpreter Barry McGovern. By running Samuel Beckett's Endgame in repertory with McGovern's cut-and-pasted version of Beckett's wartime novel Watt, they give audiences an hour-long amuse-bouche alongside the main course, and a mostly painless introduction to one of Beckett's least-welcoming, and subsequently less-visited, works. Written over five years between 1941 and 1945 while Beckett - as a result of his involvement in the French Resistance - hid from the Gestapo in Rousillon, Watt was rejected by publishers until 1953.
NEWS
August 9, 2011
Australian Nancy Wake, 98, who as a spy became one the Allies' most decorated servicewomen for her role in the French Resistance during World War II, has died in London, officials said Monday. Ms. Wake, code-named "The White Mouse" by the Gestapo, died Sunday in a nursing home, Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard said. Trained by British intelligence in espionage and sabotage, Ms. Wake helped to arm and lead 7,000 Resistance fighters in weakening German defenses before the D-Day invasion.
NEWS
August 9, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CANBERRA, Australia - Australian Nancy Wake, who as a spy became one the Allies' most decorated servicewomen for her role in the French Resistance during World War II, died in London Sunday, officials said yesterday. She was 98. Trained by British intelligence in espionage and sabotage, Wake helped to arm and lead 7,000 Resistance fighters in weakening German defenses before the D-Day invasion in the last months of the war. While distributing weapons, money and code books in Nazi-occupied France, she evaded capture many times and reached the top of the Gestapo's wanted list, according to her biographer, Peter FitzSimons.
NEWS
July 8, 2011
Simone M. Bleuzé Clark, 88, formerly of Havertown, a retired real estate agent and volunteer, died of complications of heart failure on Monday, June 27, at Roxborough Hospital. Mrs. Clark grew up with nine siblings in Tourcoing, France. In her early teens, she was a clerical worker in a textile factory and later trained as a nurse. After the Nazis invaded her country in 1939, she was a messenger for the French Resistance. In 1946, she emigrated to the U.S. and joined an aunt in New York City.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
O utside the Law , an Oscar-nominated foreign film from Rachid Bouchareb, is a gripping French-Algerian coproduction that makes Algeria's epic struggle for independence from France look like a gangster movie. Bouchareb reunites his leads from the acclaimed Days of Glory (2006) . Where that film explored the contradictions of Northern Africans fighting in the French army during World War II, this one, spanning 1954 to 1962, chronicles the Algerian resistance against the French.
NEWS
November 26, 2010 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph F. Quirk Jr., 90, of Prospect Park, an Army Air Force tail gunner shot down over Nazi-occupied France during World War II whose escape to England via the French Resistance was chronicled in a film, died Nov. 21 of age-related illness at home. Mr. Quirk, a lifelong Collingdale resident, worked as a production supervisor for the Boeing Co. for 38 years, his family said, and was active on the Collingdale Borough Council. He was best known, though, for two hair-raising weeks he spent in 1943 fleeing the Nazis.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2010
GIMME FIVE The website metacritic.com says that so far, "The Social Network" is running fifth as the best-reviewed movie of all time. The rest of the list: 1. "The Godfather. " (1972) Francis Ford Coppola's Mafia saga. 2. "Superman II. " (1980) Christopher Reeve's second outing as the Man of Steel. 3. "Army of Shadows. " (1969) Thriller about the French Resistance. 4. "Pan's Labyrinth. " (2006) A Spanish language fantasy film directed by Guillermo del Toro. 5. "The Social Network.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2006 | By GLENN WHIPP Los Angeles Daily News
Jean-Pierre Melville's French Resistance saga "Army of Shadows" opens with a shot of German soldiers marching down the Champs-Elysees, the Arc de Triomphe prominent in the background. It's a gut-punching image that remains haunting to this day, and one can only imagine the bad memories it conjured up for French moviegoers when the movie opened in 1969. Melville's movie isn't focused on the German occupation, though the Nazis are always there in the background. Melville is more interested in his countrymen.
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