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BUSINESS
January 17, 1992 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frito-Lay Inc. said yesterday that it was closing its meat-snack plant in Bensalem as part of the company's effort to become more competitive. The plant, which employs about 70 workers, has made dried-beef snacks under the Rustler's Roundup brand name. Frito-Lay said the plant was too small and lacked space for expansion. The Bensalem plant is to be closed within 90 days. After that, the snacks will be made under contract at the Folcroft plant of GoodMark Foods Inc. GoodMark, which makes such meat snacks as Slim Jims, said the additional business from Frito-Lay was not likely to require expansion at the Folcroft plant.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES Inquirer staff writer Susan Warner contributed to this article
The U.S. Justice Department is investigating the nation's $6.5 billion salty snack-food industry for possible antitrust practices, the latest in a series of high-profile government probes. "We are looking at the possibility of anticompetitive practices in the snack-food industry," department spokeswoman Gina Talamona said yesterday. She declined to name any company under investigation, but Frito-Lay controls more than half the market for salty snack foods with products such as its Lays potato chips, Doritos, Rold Gold pretzels and Tostitos.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1999 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Take a walk down a supermarket snack-food aisle in the Philadelphia region, look around, lick your lips, and revel in the sheer couch-potato culinary pleasure. Pound for fatty pound, this is one of the best places in the nation - for potato chips. In a Giant supermarket in Bucks County on Friday, potato chip bags consumed a full 135 feet of shelf space, with seven brands and 34 styles or flavors. Elsewhere in the nation, potato-chip options might be half that, with national brands far more dominant.
NEWS
November 7, 1994 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Talk about trying to please. The folks at Frito-Lay have redesigned their Doritos Tortilla Chip to make the edges rounder - so customers will no longer experience that little jab in the roof of the mouth or back of the throat as they crunch. No more: Yum. Gulp. Oooh! Rounding the edges, the company says, will also decrease the crumbs in the bottom of the bag, because most of those are nothing more than sharp edges that broke off. The new, improved chip will be rolled out in January, according to Brock Leach, Frito-Lay vice president for brand marketing.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
What began as a Deptford woman's "why not?" entry to a national potato chip contest has proved to be a moment of record in the annals of American snack history. Meneko Spigner McBeth's Kettle Cooked Wasabi Ginger chip proposal also has brought her national attention, $1 million, and possibly a new Audi. And there's the five-pound weight gain she jokes about. McBeth, 35, a Temple University Hospital medical-surgical nurse, was named the winner of the Frito-Lay "Do Us a Flavor" contest during a dinner in New York City on Monday evening.
NEWS
October 3, 2011
Arch Clark West, 97, the retired Frito-Lay executive credited with creating Doritos, died Sept. 20 in Dallas. Mr. West had a food-industry reputation when the Frito Co. recruited him as its marketing vice president in 1960. He had worked for Lever Bros. and Young & Rubicam in New York as a liaison between the creative teams and clients that included Jell-O. He was inspired to create Doritos after Frito merged with H.W. Lay & Co. in 1961. During a family vacation to California, "we were near San Diego and he stumbled on some little shack where they were making some interesting kind of chip," his daughter Jana Hacker said.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1990 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Want to indulge in a big bag of potato chips but spare yourself that mega- dose of oil just oozing calories? Love butter, but just can't conscience that cholesterol? One day, you may be able to partake without guilt - well, less guilt, anyway. A fledgling Allentown company, Supercritical Processing Inc. (SCP), is marketing a process it says can extract the nasty elements from food, leaving intact healthier and less-fattening edibles. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania has paid for some of SCP's research into removing cholesterol from butter, while the University of California at Davis and an egg company have financed its attempts to zap the cholesterol from eggs.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1990 | The New York Daily News, New York Post and the Associated Press contributed to this report
NO LOVE BETWEEN THEM A bit of a sticky wicket in Burbank yesterday when Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys crashed a news conference called by cousin Stanley Love - brother of Beach Boy Mike Love - who was about to announce his intention to become legal overseer of Wilson's estate and life. "I have heard of the charges by Stan Love, and I think they're outrageous," said Wilson, who dismissed allegations that therapist Eugene Landy controls his every move. Love contended that Landy abused his role as therapist by taking control of Wilson's finances and other aspects of the singer's life.
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributors to this report include the Associated Press, the New York Daily News, the Washington Post and USA Today
Three top male opera stars, Luciano Pavarotti, Placido Domingo and Jose Carreras, will perform together in a summer concert - tied into the World Cup soccer tournament - that is expected to draw a worldwide TV audience of 800 million, organizers announced yesterday in Rome. The July 7 gig will be held in Rome's Terme di Caracalla theater and will feature a 186-piece orchestra conducted by Zubin Mehta. The United States will be among nations receiving the telecast. CELEBRITY DOCKET Ivana Trump's lawyers went to court Tuesday to get permission to question dozens of Donald Trump's associates, Marla Maples among them, and to limit the number of documents The Donald's lawyers can ask of Ivana.
NEWS
January 29, 1999 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Some people think the competition in the Super Bowl is between two football teams. But what do they know? The ball game will be part of it, sure. But for many viewers the real action is the competition between Super Bowl advertisers. Last year, there was considerable debate over whether the best ad on the broadcast was the Tabasco commercial in which a mosquito blows up after biting a guy who'd put the hot stuff on his sandwich . . . or the Pepsi commercial in which a high-jumping skier shares a Pepsi with a migrating Canada goose . . . or Budweiser's series of ads in which Louie the Lizard, jealous of the frogs hired to croak Bud-weis-er, hires a ferret to eliminate them permanently.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
What began as a Deptford woman's "why not?" entry to a national potato chip contest has proved to be a moment of record in the annals of American snack history. Meneko Spigner McBeth's Kettle Cooked Wasabi Ginger chip proposal also has brought her national attention, $1 million, and possibly a new Audi. And there's the five-pound weight gain she jokes about. McBeth, 35, a Temple University Hospital medical-surgical nurse, was named the winner of the Frito-Lay "Do Us a Flavor" contest during a dinner in New York City on Monday evening.
SPORTS
September 16, 2013 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cary Williams cannot remember all the odd jobs he worked. He lifeguarded and unloaded trucks for FedEx. He punched the clock at Target and manned the overnight sanitation shift at a Frito-Lay factory. He took phone calls and installed satellite dishes for DirecTV. He extended his fingers as he listed the high schools he attended. There were three in four years. He can't keep track of all the homes he lived in, bouncing from one place to the next, sometimes spending nights in a hotel where his father was a security guard.
NEWS
October 3, 2011
Arch Clark West, 97, the retired Frito-Lay executive credited with creating Doritos, died Sept. 20 in Dallas. Mr. West had a food-industry reputation when the Frito Co. recruited him as its marketing vice president in 1960. He had worked for Lever Bros. and Young & Rubicam in New York as a liaison between the creative teams and clients that included Jell-O. He was inspired to create Doritos after Frito merged with H.W. Lay & Co. in 1961. During a family vacation to California, "we were near San Diego and he stumbled on some little shack where they were making some interesting kind of chip," his daughter Jana Hacker said.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1999 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Take a walk down a supermarket snack-food aisle in the Philadelphia region, look around, lick your lips, and revel in the sheer couch-potato culinary pleasure. Pound for fatty pound, this is one of the best places in the nation - for potato chips. In a Giant supermarket in Bucks County on Friday, potato chip bags consumed a full 135 feet of shelf space, with seven brands and 34 styles or flavors. Elsewhere in the nation, potato-chip options might be half that, with national brands far more dominant.
NEWS
January 29, 1999 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Some people think the competition in the Super Bowl is between two football teams. But what do they know? The ball game will be part of it, sure. But for many viewers the real action is the competition between Super Bowl advertisers. Last year, there was considerable debate over whether the best ad on the broadcast was the Tabasco commercial in which a mosquito blows up after biting a guy who'd put the hot stuff on his sandwich . . . or the Pepsi commercial in which a high-jumping skier shares a Pepsi with a migrating Canada goose . . . or Budweiser's series of ads in which Louie the Lizard, jealous of the frogs hired to croak Bud-weis-er, hires a ferret to eliminate them permanently.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES Inquirer staff writer Susan Warner contributed to this article
The U.S. Justice Department is investigating the nation's $6.5 billion salty snack-food industry for possible antitrust practices, the latest in a series of high-profile government probes. "We are looking at the possibility of anticompetitive practices in the snack-food industry," department spokeswoman Gina Talamona said yesterday. She declined to name any company under investigation, but Frito-Lay controls more than half the market for salty snack foods with products such as its Lays potato chips, Doritos, Rold Gold pretzels and Tostitos.
SPORTS
September 1, 1995 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A college football season that started with a miraculous August comeback in Ann Arbor, Mich., will stride right past New Year's Day and finish on Jan. 2. That's when the national title could be decided in Tempe, Ariz., at the Fiesta Bowl. Frito-Lay, which sponsors the Fiesta Bowl, will pay $8.5 million to each of the two schools that survive all the Saturday shootouts over the next three months. Welcome to Year One of the bowl alliance, the closest thing yet to a playoff system.
NEWS
December 11, 1994 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
James S. Herr spends much of his time in a striking, modern office building, working in front of a mural of Angus steers and potato plants. But not all of it. In Tokyo three years ago, he sat with President Bush's official delegation and witnessed a now-famous bout of presidential nausea. In Washington in September, he made a presentation on nurturing small businesses to Boris Yeltsin and Bill Clinton. But he may become best known for a trip he took to a Lancaster County potato field a few months ago. He donned a Herr's hat and stepped in front of a television camera to talk about a simple life, an honest day's work, and Herr's potato chips, in his company's first television commercial.
NEWS
November 7, 1994 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Talk about trying to please. The folks at Frito-Lay have redesigned their Doritos Tortilla Chip to make the edges rounder - so customers will no longer experience that little jab in the roof of the mouth or back of the throat as they crunch. No more: Yum. Gulp. Oooh! Rounding the edges, the company says, will also decrease the crumbs in the bottom of the bag, because most of those are nothing more than sharp edges that broke off. The new, improved chip will be rolled out in January, according to Brock Leach, Frito-Lay vice president for brand marketing.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1992 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frito-Lay Inc. said yesterday that it was closing its meat-snack plant in Bensalem as part of the company's effort to become more competitive. The plant, which employs about 70 workers, has made dried-beef snacks under the Rustler's Roundup brand name. Frito-Lay said the plant was too small and lacked space for expansion. The Bensalem plant is to be closed within 90 days. After that, the snacks will be made under contract at the Folcroft plant of GoodMark Foods Inc. GoodMark, which makes such meat snacks as Slim Jims, said the additional business from Frito-Lay was not likely to require expansion at the Folcroft plant.
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