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Frostbite

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SPORTS
February 17, 2002 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Olympic wrestling champion Rulon Gardner was listed in fair condition yesterday after surviving a frigid night in Wyoming's backcountry. Family members said Gardner was being treated for frostbite. It was unclear how long he would remain hospitalized at the Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center in Idaho Falls. Temperatures Thursday night dipped to 20 degrees below zero in the Bridger-Teton National Forest, where Gardner got stuck in deep snow while snowmobiling with three friends.
NEWS
January 15, 1994 | by Kathy Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
Brace yourself for a weekend blast of the kind of air that Adm. Robert E. Peary found when he trekked to the North Pole in 1909. Siberian cold. Yukon cold. Dogsled and mukluks cold. According to forecasters, the jet stream has moved to a north-south flow, allowing air from the Arctic circle to reach us. Accu-Weather's Ken Reeves said temperatures were expected to dip into the single digits today and tomorrow, and to zero tonight. He said temperatures might even go to 4 or 5 degress below zero tonight in some of the northern and western suburbs.
NEWS
December 16, 2012
Maurice Herzog, 93, the first man to climb a 26,5454-foot Himalayan peak despite losing all his fingers and toes to frostbite, died Friday. The mountaineer, who went on to scale the heights of French politics, became a household name after his 1950 Annapurna climb. A statement from the Elysee Presidential Palace said he died in France, but it gave no further details. He had lived just outside Paris. A photograph of Mr. Herzog waving a French tricolor atop the peak in Nepal captured a seminal moment before the grueling descent, during which subzero conditions led to the amputation of all his fingers and toes.
SPORTS
January 10, 1996 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The Atlantic Ten Conference game between No. 1-ranked Massachusetts and St. Joseph's, which was scheduled to be played last night at St. Joseph's, was postponed until tonight. Tip-off is 7. The Minutemen (12-0, 1-0) were to fly into Philadelphia from Hartford last night. UMass coach John Calipari had ruled out getting his team to the game by bus or train. St. Joseph's (4-4, 0-0) had a 9 1/2-hour bus ride Monday returning from Blacksburg, Va., where the game with Virginia Tech was postponed on Sunday by several feet of snow.
NEWS
May 14, 1986 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Joggers might be interested in a new hazard that has been discovered by a physician. It's not as common as the heart attacks, torn ligaments, broken ankles, dog bites, muggings, and other jogging risks we hear about. But it is something that joggers might give some thought to avoiding, since it can be painful and debilitating. The physician, Dr. Melvin Hershkowitz of Jersey City, writes about the hazard in the New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. Hershkowitz, a jogger, was the victim.
NEWS
February 26, 2013
Frostbite forces explorer to stop LONDON - British explorer Ranulph Fiennes on Monday pulled out of an expedition to cross Antarctica after developing frostbite - a bitter disappointment for an adventurer who had spent years preparing for one of the last great polar challenges. Fiennes, 68, and his five-member team had hoped to traverse nearly 2,500 miles in a place where temperatures often dip as low as minus 70 Celsius (minus 94 F). The expedition, dubbed "The Coldest Journey," will continue without him. Fiennes, who has been going where others fear to tread for decades and in 2009 became the oldest person to climb Mount Everest, already is missing parts of his fingers on his left hand because of frostbite suffered a decade ago on a North Pole expedition.
NEWS
December 4, 1991 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph James Cicippio was held in chains on a partially open balcony during two Beirut winters and suffered permanent frostbite damage to his hands and feet, his U.S. doctor said at a medical briefing yesterday. The frostbite damage, which has caused him persistent skin problems, means that for the rest of his life he can expect to experience a burning sensation whenever the temperature falls below 50 degrees. The 61-year-old accountant also suffers occasional spells of lightheadedness, which are believed to stem from his abduction on Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1986 | By AMERICAN HEALTH MAGAZINE, Special to the Daily News
Is the cotton there to keep pills fresh? That's what some of us wonder when we open a new bottle of aspirin or vitamin pills. Well, wonder no more. According to Dr. Steven Aron, medical director of Glenbrook Laboratories, makers of Bayer aspirin, cotton is used only to keep the pills from rattling around and breaking before you get them home. Plus, once you remove it, it might become contaminated with the microorganisms we carry around on our fingers, and should be discarded. FLAKY ADVICE "As kids, my brother and I had the worst dandruff," says Alfred Colella of Brooklyn, N.Y. "A friend advised us to apply warm peanut oil to the scalp, rub in the juice of a fresh lemon, then shampoo.
NEWS
March 12, 2003
It's a story of survival and heartbreak, of endurance against the odds and mortality against all hopes. Like so much lately, it tears you in two directions at once. But the great thing - and what we all need - is that, despite the loss and suffering, life wins. It began with a family trip, a flight taken by the Ferrises - Ronald and Tayne Ferris, and their sons Shawn, Kyle, Jordan, Ryan and Tyler - in their single-engine Piper Cherokee from Lakeland, Fla., to their home in New Hampshire.
SPORTS
August 25, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
Blistered and scarred, American sprinter Justin Gatlin arrived in South Korea for the world championships with frostbite on both feet. The 2004 Olympic champion, who last year made his return to competition after serving a 4-year doping ban, said yesterday he got frostbite about 2 weeks ago after going into a cryogenic chamber with wet socks. He didn't lose any toes and will still run in Daegu, but his wounds are not completely healed. "You wake up at 9 o'clock in the morning in Orlando and it's already 90 degrees," said Gatlin, 29, who lives and trains in Florida.
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NEWS
February 26, 2013
Frostbite forces explorer to stop LONDON - British explorer Ranulph Fiennes on Monday pulled out of an expedition to cross Antarctica after developing frostbite - a bitter disappointment for an adventurer who had spent years preparing for one of the last great polar challenges. Fiennes, 68, and his five-member team had hoped to traverse nearly 2,500 miles in a place where temperatures often dip as low as minus 70 Celsius (minus 94 F). The expedition, dubbed "The Coldest Journey," will continue without him. Fiennes, who has been going where others fear to tread for decades and in 2009 became the oldest person to climb Mount Everest, already is missing parts of his fingers on his left hand because of frostbite suffered a decade ago on a North Pole expedition.
NEWS
December 16, 2012
Maurice Herzog, 93, the first man to climb a 26,5454-foot Himalayan peak despite losing all his fingers and toes to frostbite, died Friday. The mountaineer, who went on to scale the heights of French politics, became a household name after his 1950 Annapurna climb. A statement from the Elysee Presidential Palace said he died in France, but it gave no further details. He had lived just outside Paris. A photograph of Mr. Herzog waving a French tricolor atop the peak in Nepal captured a seminal moment before the grueling descent, during which subzero conditions led to the amputation of all his fingers and toes.
SPORTS
August 25, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
Blistered and scarred, American sprinter Justin Gatlin arrived in South Korea for the world championships with frostbite on both feet. The 2004 Olympic champion, who last year made his return to competition after serving a 4-year doping ban, said yesterday he got frostbite about 2 weeks ago after going into a cryogenic chamber with wet socks. He didn't lose any toes and will still run in Daegu, but his wounds are not completely healed. "You wake up at 9 o'clock in the morning in Orlando and it's already 90 degrees," said Gatlin, 29, who lives and trains in Florida.
NEWS
December 4, 2008 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard J. Conner, 92, a West Chester legend who endured frostbite to lead a regiment that helped liberate Luxembourg during World War II, died Sunday of injuries he suffered in a traffic accident near his home. Mr. Conner was a familiar figure in the borough, running a gas station in the days when an attendant would greet the driver, wipe the windshield, and check the oil. He later opened a tire store, got involved in local government, and for four decades regularly joined friends for breakfast at Mrs. Mike's restaurant.
NEWS
February 2, 2005 | By Ira Porter INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For James Phillips' sake, the Eagles need to win the Super Bowl. Or his sacrifice was all for naught. "They better win the Super Bowl after all I went through," Phillips said last night from his hospital bed, mopping the sweat from his brow with bandages that are wrapped around both of his hands. He said doctors have told him that they are going to have to cut off the tips of the pinky, ring and middle fingers on his left hand because of severe frostbite. Phillips, of Marcus Hook, worked for 30 hours shoveling snow at Lincoln Financial Field the night before the Jan. 23 NFC championship game against the Falcons, and then, as a reward for his hard work, stayed to watch the game.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2003 | By John Tierno FOR THE INQUIRER
A bit of holiday magic can be found at the Enchantment Theatre Company production of The Snow Queen, on stage through Dec. 21 at Drexel University's Mandell Theatre. The Hans Christian Anderson fairy tale tells the story of two friends, Gerda and Kai. Kai falls under the spell of the evil queen's magic mirror, and his heart grows cold toward Gerda. When the Queen lures Kai away, Gerda sets out alone on an epic adventure to find her friend. "The show has girl power, big time, because Gerda is the hero.
NEWS
March 12, 2003
It's a story of survival and heartbreak, of endurance against the odds and mortality against all hopes. Like so much lately, it tears you in two directions at once. But the great thing - and what we all need - is that, despite the loss and suffering, life wins. It began with a family trip, a flight taken by the Ferrises - Ronald and Tayne Ferris, and their sons Shawn, Kyle, Jordan, Ryan and Tyler - in their single-engine Piper Cherokee from Lakeland, Fla., to their home in New Hampshire.
SPORTS
February 17, 2002 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Olympic wrestling champion Rulon Gardner was listed in fair condition yesterday after surviving a frigid night in Wyoming's backcountry. Family members said Gardner was being treated for frostbite. It was unclear how long he would remain hospitalized at the Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center in Idaho Falls. Temperatures Thursday night dipped to 20 degrees below zero in the Bridger-Teton National Forest, where Gardner got stuck in deep snow while snowmobiling with three friends.
NEWS
April 22, 2000 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As part of his preparation for the Hubble Space Telescope repair mission a few years ago, astronaut Story Musgrave consulted with Dorothy Hamill, the ice-skating champion. Figure skating and working in space demand the same kind of concentration, he said in an interview Thursday evening before addressing the Philadelphia area chapter of the Explorers Club, an international society that promotes field research and scientific exploration. "It's like when the skater puts that blade into the ice," he said, in describing how he carried out his part in the intricately choreographed space walks.
SPORTS
November 10, 1996 | By Mayer Brandschain, FOR THE INQUIRER
The men's and women's varsity eight crews of Temple University achieved the fastest times in winning the principal races of the Philadelphia Frostbite Regatta yesterday on the Schuylkill. Twelve college varsities competed in three men's eight-oared races. Temple was in the third race and won it in 3 minutes and 46 seconds In the women's college varsity eight, there were 28 crews divided into six races. Temple triumphed in the sixth race in 4:29.99.
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