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NEWS
December 10, 1998
U.N. agreements on human rights issues 1948: U.N. Universal Declaration of Human Rights 1966: International Covenant of Civil and Political Rights; International Covenant of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination 1979: Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women 1989: Convention on the Rights of the Child 1998: Vote to establish an...
NEWS
March 13, 1988 | By Mark Jenkins, Special to The Inquirer
It is no secret that the Chinese take their food very seriously, and Singapore's Chinese are no exception. At the head of the list is the durian, a mere fruit. Its consumption is linked to phenomena as far-ranging as sexual potency, premature death and ethnic disturbances. The folklore and legends surrounding the durian are so many and varied as to cause skeptical elevations of eyebrows elsewhere. Tread carefully when passing judgments in durian territory, however, for open ridicule faces anyone who questions the position that the durian occupies in the dietary calendar of Singapore's Chinese.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thanks to cyanide-spiked grapes turning up in Philadelphia last week, Linda Bolanos' fourth graders now have a better sense of world geography than some of the contestants on Family Feud. Bolanos was feeling a little smug Wednesday night as she watched people on the television show try to come up with countries in South America. Such as: Saudi Arabia? The contestants should have asked Bolanos' class of 9- and 10-year-olds at the Erdenheim Elementary School in Springfield Township; they learned all about Chile on Tuesday.
FOOD
August 21, 1991 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
Reach for a ripe banana. Whip it up with yogurt, wheat germ and skim milk. Then sit back and sip that super-rich and filling diet drink while you consider all the ways to use luscious bananas for more than slicing over cereal. Bananas, after all, are the top-selling fruit in the country. And the 25 pounds of bananas per person consumed each year in the United States amounts to only a fraction of the 40-plus billion pounds consumed worldwide, much of it in countries where bananas are the staple starch.
FOOD
May 15, 1991 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
We've been duped to assume that rhubarb is a fruit, simply because we bake it in pie and stew it into jam. But rhubarb is no more fruit than the stalks of chard and celery that it so closely resembles. Once again our gustatory prejudice has led us astray, for we will call any vegetable a fruit when we eat it sweet. Rhubarb is the stem of a plant belonging to the same family as sorrel, and like sorrel, rhubarb has been cursed and blessed with a sourness that can range from a faint spark on the palate, when the plant is young, to an unpleasant puckering when it gets larger.
FOOD
October 31, 1993 | By Kristi Fuller, FOR THE INQUIRER
Want to freeze those good produce buys? Here are some tips to help you end up with the best results. Wash produce in cold water before freezing it. If necessary, remove leaves, stems, skins or pits. Cut produce into even-sized pieces. Label containers with the contents and "use-by" date. (Use within 12 months.) Leave a 1/2- to 1-inch head space between produce and top of the bag or container. Remove as much air as possible from the bag (if using plastic freezer bags)
FOOD
December 4, 1991 | by Bonnie Tandy Leblang and Carolyn Wyman, Special to the Daily News
Melissa's Fresh Pack. $1.99 per box of fruits, nuts and/or cookies. Bonnie: Finally, here's some healthy competition for McDonald's Happy Meals. Melissa's has introduced a pack of fresh fruit and other goodies in a colorful kids' activity box. Each pack contains two to three pieces of fresh fruit: an apple, pear, banana, and/or an orange in the regular pack; pear, star fruit or kiwi in the gourmet or exotic pack. In addition, it usually also contains dried fruit such as raisins or a dried banana along with an almond or fortune cookie.
FOOD
September 28, 1988 | By Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
It's now or never, fresh fruit fans - time to put the flavor of summer on ice! Stock your freezer now, and you can enjoy the tantalizing taste of a tree-ripened peach in February. But first, there are practical considerations. With the drought and the price of fresh produce this season, freezing fruit can't be considered an economy move - unless you have access to a large harvest of free or cheap fruit, lots of freezer space and low electricity bills. If you want to bet on food price "futures" in your freezer, stocking up on lean meat is a better investment strategy.
FOOD
March 22, 1989 | By Sonja Heinze, Special to the Daily News
Q. I read an article on how to dry fruit. The process involved constructing wooden frames, using cheesecloth and drying the fruit outside for two to three weeks. I need something faster. Can fruit be dried in the oven? - Jen Haeseler Auburn, Pa. A. "Stocking Up" by Rodale Press gives the following information on how to dry fruit in the oven: The fruit to be dried should be perfect - unblemished, unbruised and fully ripe. One oven can take about six pounds of fruit. Fruit should be exposed top and bottom.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | By Barbara Demick, Inquirer Staff Writer
To reassure shoppers who are nervous about Chilean produce because two grapes out of a shipload of fruit were tainted by cyanide, many retailers are posting signs on fruit indicating its country of origin. But how can you tell where fruit came from if it isn't labeled? There are no exact rules for tracing fruit. But fruit wholesaler Mark Levin of M. Levin & Co. Inc. of Philadelphia offers some guidelines. There is a 99 percent chance that at this time of year the grapes you see on supermarket shelves came from Chile, Levin says.
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NEWS
September 1, 2016 | Elizabeth Wellington, Fashion Writer
If this summer of short shorts, mercilessly skinny pants, leather and latex body-suits, snug rompers, and sheer maxis wasn't enough of a visual tip-off, the MTV Video Music Awards certainly confirmed it: The mons pubis is having a fashion moment. After centuries of habitually camouflaging the pelvic area with all manner of fruits and frocks, women's private parts have never been more visible. Or distracting. Take Beyoncé's memorable red-carpet appearance, for example, which I wrote about on Monday . The megastar and her daughter, Blue Ivy, floated onto the VMA red carpet Sunday night like a pair of cumulus couture clouds.
FOOD
August 11, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Makes 5-6 servings For the syrup: 2/3 cup clover honey 1 teaspoon finely grated orange zest 1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon fresh orange juice or blood orange juice 1 tablespoon chopped fresh culinary lavender spikes (flower heads) or 1 tablespoon dried culinary lavender buds 1 teaspoon coarsely crushed coriander seed For the fruit: 6 or 7 medium, just-ripe peaches or nectarines, or 8 or 9 large just-ripe apricots 1 tablespoon unsalted butter 1 teaspoon olive oil or safflower oil Pinch fine sea salt 1. For the syrup: Stir together the honey, zest, juice, lavender, and coriander seed in a medium nonreactive saucepan until well blended.
FOOD
July 1, 2016
Soda worth the extra cents There has been much ado about soda in the news lately. One bubbly beverage worth the extra 1.5-cent-per-ounce tax is the Philadelphia-brewed Press Gang Ginger Beer. It has the right amount of ginger, plus lime juice, vanilla, and, yes, cane sugar for sweetness. - Samantha Melamed Press Gang Ginger Beer, $3.99 for 11 ounces, at Fair Food Farmstand at the Reading Terminal Market, 51 N. 12th St., Philadelphia, 215-386-5211. For your fresh fruit The farmers' market is the inspiration for many of the wares at Heirloom Home & Studio, the small ceramics studio run by Gregg and Jackie Moore of Glenside.
NEWS
November 13, 2015 | Philly Clout
IN THE INTEREST of combatting the absurdity of the Republican presidential field - and creating engaging art - some politically minded Philly-area artists bought a gargantuan tour bus used by Donald Trump 's presidential campaign and let people throw fruit punch at it. Of course! Daily News intern Joe Brandt brought us this Clout item: "We're trying to drive some smiles, but we're also trying to talk about some of the absurdity in the political world," said David Gleeson, who with t.Rutt and other artists put together "America on the Rag. " The exhibit is spurred in part by the Donald's comment after the first Republican debate that moderator Megyn Kelly had "blood coming out of her wherever," and encouraging the candidates not to demean women about their time of the month.
FOOD
October 23, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
'Do you eat breakfast before school in the morning?" I asked the fifth graders at Wiggins Prep Elementary School in Camden. "No," said Aa'myrah Bethea, 10. "I get up and put my uniform on, then I get back in bed till my mom calls me. " Aa'myrah, who prefers to be called Coco, is not unlike many kids her age who would gladly skip breakfast for a few more minutes of sleep. So on the first of eight weeks of classes teaching kids how to prepare simple, delicious, healthy meals, breakfast was Lesson One. This fall, we are cooking at the well-used kitchen of Baptist Temple Church, the 98-year-old stone stalwart on South Fourth Street in Camden across from the public school, where there was no kitchen option.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elizabeth Grice, a University of Pennsylvania assistant professor, embodies the new way that academia and drug companies collaborate on research to generate cash for schools and profitable medicines for manufacturers. Grice, like many researchers, gets most of her funding from government agencies such as the National Institutes of Health and foundations. Like some, she also is doing work for a for-profit pharmaceutical company - in her case, Janssen Pharmaceuticals. What's changed in recent years is the nature of that academic-industry relationship.
NEWS
October 12, 2015 | By Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a golden October afternoon on the outskirts of Strawberry Mansion, a crowd gathered around a hand-cranked wooden press to squeeze out fresh apple cider. On the lawn, children painted pumpkins and ate freshly made treats. In the shadow of one of the city's historic treasures, Saturday's seventh annual Woodford Orchard Apple Harvest Festival in Fairmount Park brought to life centuries-old crafts - and showcased one of the city's most unusual learning environments. Among the fruits of age-old talents on display, bakers shared homemade apple muffins, apple sauce, and pies to be judged and then quickly consumed.
FOOD
August 21, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
It's understating the case to call these last weeks of summer "stone-fruit season. " No. This is the real fruit season, the only fruit season. For anyone who cares about sweet and natural deliciousness, all the other weeks are merely prelude to the sticky, juicy days of August. "Stone fruits are a massive favorite for me," says Aimee Olexy of the Talula's triumvirate, "and I look forward to getting them every year. " Right now, white and yellow peaches are at their bursting peak; plums beckon with a lustrous gleam.
NEWS
August 14, 2015
B uzz: Hey, Marnie, I was at a boardwalk bar and they were offering wine cocktails! I thought you couldn't make a mixed drink with wine. What's the deal? Marnie: People often assume that wine is sacrosanct, that mixing it will somehow ruin it. But, it's just like any other drink in that it often tastes good mixed with other things. Nowadays, people are getting past these hang-ups and I'm seeing more wine-based drinks out there. Buzz: OK, now that I think about it, I did have a mimosa once and that has champagne in it, which is technically wine.
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