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Fruit Trees

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LIVING
February 2, 1986 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
Gardeners can afford to be lazy in January, but by February it is time to start planning the strategy for the next few months. First, a couple of thoughts on the pruning of fruit trees that might cause you to revise your winter pruning schedule. John Rayburn, who has managed the orchard and vegetable garden at Longwood Gardens near Kennett Square for years, used to spend many of his winter days outside, pruning fruit trees. A few years ago, Longwood abandoned the old orchards and planted in the main garden dwarf and semidwarf trees, many of which are grown on trellises.
LIVING
December 1, 2006 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nothing gets Yvonne McClatchy's holiday heartstrings going like a sea of sprightly poinsettias in their glistening foil-covered pots. Like many of us, she instinctively reaches for red. It's not just habit. She truly loves the color and the look. She's got her traditional plant gifts, too, with cyclamen usually topping the list. Put it in a Christmasy pot and she's there. But this year, as the Berwyn gardener cruises the aisles at Waterloo Gardens in Devon, she finds herself thinking different thoughts.
NEWS
March 22, 1998 | By Denise-Marie Balona, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At first glance, the brownish-green nubs look like goose bumps on the skinny, naked arms of young peach trees. A closer look reveals glimpses of bright pink, the first hint of a peach blossom. Doug Zee, a Glassboro fruit farmer, bends a flimsy branch to show this season's new buds on a tree he has identified as an Autumn Glow variety. He picks a sprout and, cradling it in the palm of his hand, peels back its hardened covering to expose tiny magenta petals. Nestled inside is a fruit, smaller than the end of a pencil lead, attached to the bottom of the flower's pistil.
NEWS
November 24, 1998 | LINDA JOHNSON / Inquirer Suburban Staff
Landscape designer Tim Comfort prunes an apple tree on a property on River Road in Lumberville. The fruit trees must be pruned after the first frost to strengthen the quality of next season's crop. No sign of frost is expected today, which should be windy but mild.
NEWS
February 24, 2012 | By Eva Monheim, Inquirer Columnist
Buy onion sets. I like to get mine in the ground no later than St. Patrick's Day and preferably by the first or second week of March. In Pennsylvania, snows that occur in late March or early April are known as "onion snows" because they usually arrive just as new onion shoots emerge. If you started your onion seeds indoors earlier, put the young plants out in a cold frame to harden off before planting. This is just as it sounds: The leaves get harder from the colder night temperatures, while the plants stay warm and protected.
NEWS
September 24, 2000 | By John Corr, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As he approaches his 92d birthday in November, Anthony Kuc, occasional farmer, former mechanical engineer, dancer, computer student and irrepressible storyteller, reflects on how much his health has improved since he was 90. He says a doctor told him then "I would be going pretty soon if I didn't have surgery. " His response was: "I can't go anytime soon. I just planted a whole bunch of fruit trees, and they need tending. " Although he still sees his doctor regularly, he says his heart condition has improved because of "alternative medicine.
NEWS
December 6, 1992 | By Michael Lear-Olimpi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Nearly a century and a half after it was founded, Winslow Township is about to get something it never had before: an official seal. And, because of the seal, officials hope the town will get a little more of something else: a stronger sense of identity and maybe even a little more respect. The seal will be dedicated during a ceremony at 3:30 p.m. today at the municipal building, 125 S. Route 73, Braddock. The seal, part of a logo bearing Township of Winslow, is the first official emblem for the town, carved from Gloucester Township on March 8, 1845.
NEWS
September 17, 2010 | By Bethann Stewart, McClatchy Newspapers
BOISE, Idaho - Part science and part sculpture, Bob Crum's fruit trees look like delicate relatives of their cousins in nearby orchards. That's intentional. "I've tinkered with this for a long time," he said of his espaliers. "The thing about espalier is it's a work in progress. You can make your own shape. All it takes is time. " Espalier is a method of training trees to grow in two dimensions in an ornamental design, often against a wall, but the trees also can be attached to freestanding trellises, such as Crum's.
NEWS
January 21, 2000 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman has authorized federal compensation for peach and nectarine farms near Gettysburg, Pa., hit by the devastating plum pox virus, Sen. Rick Santorum (R., Pa.) said yesterday. Glickman signed an emergency declaration Wednesday and intends to announce it soon, Santorum said in an interview from his Washington office. The declaration does not provide funding or a timetable for funding, said Santorum, a member of the Senate Agriculture Committee.
NEWS
May 6, 2011
Here's a pruning book written for amateurs like us: The Pruning Answer Book: Solutions to Every Problem You'll Ever Face, Answers to Every Question You'll Ever Ask , by Penelope O'Sullivan and the late Lewis Hill. With 365 pages and a title like that, you'd expect every problem and question to be included. Not quite. But this little gem from Storey Publishing ($14.95) - and I do mean little - packs a lot into a modest 41/2-by-61/2-inch frame. It includes when and why to prune; right and wrong techniques for flowering, ornamental, evergreen, deciduous, fruit, and nut trees, as well as vines, ground covers, and hedges.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2016
Get intimate with the weather. For the next two weeks, we walk the line between frost and not frost in or near the city. Any time the forecast calls for freezing overnight temperatures, run out and cover your transplants and newly sprouted seeds with plastic, straw, newspaper tents, milk jugs, bed linens, or store-bought row cover. Exposure to the cold will probably not kill your little babies, but it will seriously set them back. Remember to remove the covers each day so plants aren't crushed by the weight or cooked by the sun. If you were silly enough to have planted tomatoes already, be prepared to sit out all night with a campfire, curled up around them to keep them warm.
NEWS
July 31, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The late July heat is blooming inside the Camden County Community Greenhouse, but the volunteers seem unfazed. Tina McHugh and Christine Pike fill wheelbarrows with ungainly petunias destined for the nearby compost pile. Steve Politowski arrives with tools so he can help finish the roof on the new potting shed. And Jane Elkis Berkowitz is ready for a plant propagation class. "The power of the flower," Freeholder Michelle Gentek-Mayer says. "It goes very far. " The once-abandoned greenhouse at the Lakeland complex in Gloucester Township will yield 15,000 flowering plants this year to beautify the county's park system and public buildings.
NEWS
April 28, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
VINELAND - This has long been a place where people tend to talk a lot about how things used to be. So fond are some of the recollections at a local pizzeria about "old Vineland" one might think the wide main street, Landis Avenue, was paved with something other than macadam back when people traveled from Philadelphia and New York to shop here. Over a latte at a vendor's stall at the new farmers' market, they'll froth on about the miles and miles of neighborhoods of once well-kept homes with the big front yards filled with flowering fruit trees.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
My farm-to-table fantasy? I harvest eggs, milk and honey with my own hands and eat the fruits of my labor, aglow in the setting sun. Yet I'm a city slicker with a short attention span. So where's the happy medium for a potential urban farmer like me? Renting. Yes, just in time for spring, you can rent chickens for eggs (with an option to adopt if you come to love them) or goats for grazing your lawn (they don't bite). You can even rent your own honeybee colony to buzz about on your rooftop or in your backyard.
FOOD
June 7, 2013 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
If having flowers on the table can make a meal seem twice as delectable - as erudite food writer Michael Pollan asserts - then how many times tastier might that meal be with the flowers in it? Many common blossoms are both decorative and flavorful additions to salads, entrees, and desserts. Further, they are full of phytochemicals, from A (antioxidants) to V (vitamins). They also are among the most ephemeral of ingredients - what I call "hyperseasonal," mementos of a fleeting moment in a plant's life cycle.
REAL_ESTATE
January 14, 2013 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
For many in Harleysville, it is probably best recognized as the former Price farm. The original 200-acre tract was settled in 1721 by Jacob Price, a preacher among the Dunkards, a mainly German conservative sect that immigrated to Pennsylvania in the early 18th century. Today, the prominent farmstead, with its main house and six buildings, sits on 7½ verdant acres and is the cherished home of Joyce Sherman and Jim Pepe. The owners have been hands-on, devoting the better part of two decades to restoring, preserving, and annexing onto the property while being committed to a green lifestyle.
NEWS
April 13, 2012 | Virginia Smith
Ever had a gardening question you thought was so dumb you couldn't bring yourself to ask it? I know, there's no such thing as a dumb question. At least, that's the approach taken by Teri Dunn Chace, author of The Anxious Gardener's Book of Answers (Timber Press, $12.95), who's written a very basic book for newbies and others who wonder about things like ... Can I plant old bulbs? Why is my compost not cooked yet? How come the grass died? Chace tackles these and 97 other gardening mistakes in 24 chapters, alphabetically arranged.
NEWS
February 24, 2012 | By Eva Monheim, Inquirer Columnist
Buy onion sets. I like to get mine in the ground no later than St. Patrick's Day and preferably by the first or second week of March. In Pennsylvania, snows that occur in late March or early April are known as "onion snows" because they usually arrive just as new onion shoots emerge. If you started your onion seeds indoors earlier, put the young plants out in a cold frame to harden off before planting. This is just as it sounds: The leaves get harder from the colder night temperatures, while the plants stay warm and protected.
NEWS
February 12, 2012
Sunday Chamber music The venerable Philadelphia Chamber Ensemble plays works by Jean Francaix, Paul Ben-Haim, and Brahms at 2 p.m. at Old Pine Street Church , Fourth and Pine Streets. Tickets are $25. Call 215-542-4890. . . . The Miami String Quartet plays works by Beethoven, Dohnanyi, and Schubert, with guest Lydia Artymiw , piano, at 3 p.m. at the Independence Seaport Museum , Columbus Boulevard and Walnut Street. Tickets are $23; $10 for students. Call 215-569-8080.
NEWS
November 27, 2011 | By Gosia Wozniacka, Associated Press
WOODLAKE, Calif. - When Manuel Jimenez first set eyes on the land below a levee, thick with brush and weeds, the onetime fieldworker envisioned a place where youngsters could escape the temptations of gang life and learn about the Central Valley's most vital industry. But, like many places in California's farming belt, this Tulare County town of 7,280 flanked by citrus groves had few resources. Best known for its annual rodeo, Woodlake has been devastated by gangs. More than 40 percent of its families, many Latino immigrant farmworkers, live in poverty.
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