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NEWS
August 8, 1993 | By Kay Lazar, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Family Service Association (FSA) of Bucks County, twice thwarted in its attempts to open a family group home in New Hope for eight people with the AIDS virus, applied last week for a new zoning permit. And on the bottom of the application, Audrey Tucker, FSA's executive director, wrote, "This application is being made in accordance with and pursuant to the (U.S.) Fair Housing (Amendments) Act of 1988. " Robert Rynkiewicz, New Hope's zoning officer, said he had never seen this statement added to a zoning-permit application.
NEWS
September 2, 1993 | By Kay Lazar, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Family Service Association (FSA) of Bucks County, twice thwarted in its attempts to open a family group home in the borough for eight people with the AIDS virus, is facing a new round of opposition. Neighbors of the proposed facility on Old York Road filed an appeal Monday to the borough's Zoning Hearing Board, challenging the zoning permit issued to FSA on Aug. 6. At the neighbors' urging, the board overturned FSA's last permit in July. It was the second time the board struck down the nonprofit agency's plans.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | By Kay Lazar, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Frustrated residents of Old York Road have won a round in their nine-month battle to block a group home for eight people with HIV from opening on their street. But the latest skirmish is unlikely to bar the nonprofit Family Service Association (FSA) of Bucks County from opening the group home at 30 Old York Rd. Under intense lobbying by residents, Borough Council members Monday night agreed to push up, from May 10 to May 3, a public hearing on zoning amendments for group homes.
NEWS
August 12, 1993 | By Kay Lazar, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Round three has opened with a bang. Fresh from their latest victory, neighbors who are fighting plans to open a home for people with the AIDS virus at 30 Old York Rd. are now questioning the honesty of Robert Rynkiewicz, the borough's zoning officer. At a heated Borough Council meeting Monday night, residents accused Rynkiewicz of lying under oath July 29 at a borough Zoning Hearing Board. At issue, according to the opponents, is whether Rynkiewicz gave contradictory answers that night when he was asked if he consulted the borough's solicitor or Borough Council members before he issued zoning and building permits in January to Family Service Association (FSA)
NEWS
May 13, 1993 | By Kay Lazar, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Borough Council voted unanimously Monday to approve zoning amendments covering family group homes, an action that appears to close a thorny, nearly yearlong chapter in the borough's history. But some residents of Old York Road who are fighting a planned family group home on their street for people with the AIDS virus are saying, "Not so fast. " "We'll have to wait and see," said Marion Eichlin. Eichlin and her husband, Harry, are the lead plaintiffs challenging the zoning and building permits the borough granted in January to the nonprofit Family Service Association of Bucks County.
NEWS
October 27, 1993 | By Christine Schiavo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The New Hope Zoning Hearing Board last night gave the green light to converting an old home in the borough into a residence for eight HIV-infected people. A packed house at the tiny borough hall cheered after the four board members voted unanimously to deny an appeal by neighbors seeking to block a zoning permit that was issued to the Family Service Association of Bucks County about two months ago. The fifth zoning board member, Matthew Rue, recused himself from the proceedings, citing a conflict of interest.
NEWS
August 20, 1992 | By Kathryn Quigley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Bucks County social services organization that is proposing a group home in New Hope for people infected with the AIDS virus had its hearing before the borough's zoning board continued until Sept. 3. The Family Services Association (FSA) of Bucks County is seeking a zoning variance to allow a house on Old York Road to operate as a group home. More than 150 residents packed the New Hope fire hall last Thursday night to hear testimony from representatives of FSA. The agency is applying for a variance under the borough's ordinance for bed-and-breakfasts because there is no provision in the zoning code for a group home.
NEWS
December 30, 1993 | By Kay Lazar, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A fierce opponent to a planned residence in New Hope for eight HIV-infected people yesterday reopened the bitter 18-month-old battle by filing a lawsuit in Bucks County Court against the project. At the end of October, the New Hope Zoning Hearing Board gave the green light to open the facility. Marion Eichlin, who lives next door to the canary-yellow, two-story house at 30 Old York Rd. proposed for the residence, said in her appeal that the eight future residents of that house would not meet the legal definition of a family, thus making the project illegal under the borough's zoning laws.
NEWS
April 11, 1993 | By Kay Lazar, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Borough Council tomorrow inherits smoldering controversy as it considers zoning amendments to cover group homes. The amendments, approved by the borough's Planning Commission last week, enraged several residents on Old York Road by apparently clearing the way for a controversial home for HIV-positive residents on their block. "We're going to inherit what the situation is," said Councilman Sid Ginsburg, who declined to say what he thought of the proposed amendments.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1996 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Securities and Exchange Commission sought an injunction yesterday to prevent a Yardley company and its owner from continuing to receive investors' money. In a complaint filed in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, the SEC alleged that William R. Palmer, through his Yardley company, Financial Services of America Inc., had defrauded investors in Pennsylvania and New Jersey of at least $1.6 million since 1992. A significant amount of the money from investors, according to the SEC, went to pay Palmer's credit card bills, rent on his condominium, and other personal and business expenses.
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NEWS
November 5, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
BAB AL-SALAMEH, Syria - Walking from Turkey into Syria at the Bab al-Salameh gate takes you down a long, desolate road flanked by high walls and barbed wire. Just beyond the barbed wire sits the Kilis refugee camp, holding thousands of desperate families who fled the bombs and shelling in towns just beyond the border. I crossed with staff from the Syrian Support Group, a Syrian American organization working to help officers of the Free Syrian Army set up a more coherent structure.
NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By Jamal Halaby, Associated Press
AMMAN, Jordan - Syria's prime minister completed his defection by crossing into Jordan at dawn Wednesday after two days of hiding inside his homeland, according to Jordanian officials and a spokesman for the rebel Free Syrian Army. They described an operation that involved deceiving the news media into reporting that Prime Minister Riad Hijab had already made it to Jordan so that the Syrians would stop looking for him. FSA spokesman Ahmed Kassem, who told the Associated Press on Monday that Hijab had defected, said Wednesday that he had actually been inside Syrian territory for the last two days waiting to cross.
NEWS
February 12, 2012 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
In 1982, I interviewed Syrian Information Minister Ahmed Iskander in Damascus, shortly after the regime had killed at least 10,000 people in the city of Hama. On his office wall hung a painting of an old Hama neighborhood with one of the waterwheels for which the city was famous. "That is our lovely city of Hama," he told me calmly. "It's perfectly peaceful. You should visit it someday. " He knew that I knew this neighborhood had been leveled to the ground. Back then, under the regime of Hafez al-Assad, there was no Internet or Skype to send out pictures of carnage.
NEWS
December 4, 2011 | By Elizabeth A. Kennedy, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Nearly nine months into the Syrian uprising, many protesters are pinning their hopes on an increasingly bold group of army defectors to give their revolution a fighting chance against President Bashar al-Assad's fiercely loyal forces. But as the Free Syrian Army gains power, the defectors could make it harder for the West to give strong diplomatic support to a movement that so far has been largely peaceful. The FSA also could give the regime an excuse to crack down even more strongly, adding to the body count in a country where more than 4,000 people already have been killed since March.
NEWS
November 15, 2011 | By Bill Reed, Inquirer Staff Writer
The largest emergency homeless shelter in Bucks County will have a new operator on Jan. 1, when the Family Service Association (FSA) replaces the Red Cross. The agreement, announced Monday, concludes a five-month search by the American Red Cross of Southeastern Pennsylvania. Operating the Bristol Township shelter did not fit the Red Cross' mission of disaster preparedness and relief, officials have said. The FSA, based in Langhorne, has been involved with the shelter since it was established 25 years ago. "We have a family health clinic here," FSA chief executive officer Audrey Tucker said after meeting with the shelter's staff, which will be retained.
NEWS
April 13, 2011
Dear Harry: My employer has had a wonderful program of a Flexible Spending Account (FSA) for employees' medical expenses. I have allocated $2,000 a year to cover most of my uninsured costs. I have never left any of the money in the account at the end of the year, so none of it was forfeited. This year is a different story. I'm fearful that I may run short because of what I have just heard. Is it true that I may no longer be reimbursed for over-the-counter medicines that I take?
NEWS
November 25, 2003 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
She danced with the Jos? Lim?n company in New York and ran her own dance troupe in Philadelphia for more than a decade. But these days Temple University dance professor Ann Vachon is more focused on preserving legacies than perfecting footwork. This year she took over as director of the Lim?n Institute, which licenses performances of the late Mexican American choreographer's works and runs a school. But there's another figure whose creative legacy she has worked to promote: her late father, photojournalist John Vachon.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1997 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New Year's Eve wasn't a cake walk for Cecelia Robinson. In fact, it was pretty busy. If you're a retailer or entertainer, you kind of expect it. But an optician? "They wait till the last dog dies to get in here," said Robinson, co-owner of Shel-Kel Optics Inc. in Mount Airy. "They say they have to spend the money before the end of the year. " The they who made her Tuesday a little longer were participants in flexible spending account - or FSA - health insurance accounts and others who had to exhaust insurance dollars before 1996 disappeared.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1996 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Securities and Exchange Commission sought an injunction yesterday to prevent a Yardley company and its owner from continuing to receive investors' money. In a complaint filed in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, the SEC alleged that William R. Palmer, through his Yardley company, Financial Services of America Inc., had defrauded investors in Pennsylvania and New Jersey of at least $1.6 million since 1992. A significant amount of the money from investors, according to the SEC, went to pay Palmer's credit card bills, rent on his condominium, and other personal and business expenses.
NEWS
March 30, 1995 | By Molly Peterson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As the house at 30 Old York Rd. remains quiet and obviously vacant, the social service agency that owns it has won its latest battle. For almost three years, the nonprofit Family Services Association of Bucks County has tried to move ahead with plans to convert the house into a group home - known as Bucks Villa - for eight people with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. But a few neighbors have fought the proposed home, saying it would violate borough zoning laws because the eight residents could not be considered a family.
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