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BUSINESS
August 3, 1991 | By John J. Fried, Inquirer Staff Writer
Buckeye Partners L.P., a pipeline carrier of refined petroleum products, has settled a four-year-old battle over challenges by the Air Transport Association of America to increases in Buckeye's rates for transporting aircraft fuel. In 1987, Buckeye, based in Emmaus, Lehigh County, filed an application with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for permission to increase its rates by 6 percent, an increase that would have brought it an additional $6 million a year. The air-transport group charged that the request was excessive and was an indication of Buckeye's monopoly power in its market, which includes New York's major airports.
SPORTS
March 25, 2011
CLEARWATER, Fla. - After nearly six weeks of early mornings and long days, you can start to run out of gas around this time in spring training. Just ask Scott Proefrock. The Phillies assistant general manager literally ran out of gas on I-75 while driving to Port Charlotte on Wednesday for the team's Grapefruit League game against the Tampa Bay Rays. In the car with him were team president David Montgomery; general manager Ruben Amaro Jr.; director of professional scouting Mike Ondo; and Jesse Rendell, the son of former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell.
SPORTS
December 29, 1995 | by Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
Page 70 of yesterday's Daily News served as a strong morning cup of coffee for the Eagles arriving for work. The page was thumbtacked to the bulletin board just inside the locker-room door, with two key paragraphs of quotations from Detroit's Lomas Brown highlighted in yellow ink. You might have heard that on Wednesday, Brown guaranteed a Lions victory over the Eagles in tomorrow's wild-card playoff game at Veterans Stadium. In case you missed it, here are some of the bold excerpts from the Pro Bowl tackle: "There is no question in my mind that we're going to win this game.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | By Monica Yant, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nearly 8,000 gallons of airplane fuel spilled from an 18-wheel tractor-trailer that overturned on the Pennsylvania Turnpike yesterday morning near Morgantown, rerouting westbound traffic for six hours. No one was injured in the accident, which involved the truck and two cars behind it, said Cpl. John Rigney of the state police. The fuel, similar to kerosene, is not flammable until it reaches 110 degrees. An undetermined amount of fuel seeped into the soil and two tributaries of the Conestoga Creek, stocked with trout for fishing.
NEWS
March 9, 2009
If at some point the government requires power plants to capture their emissions of carbon dioxide, a key challenge will be what to do with the stuff. Some have advocated storing the heat-trapping greenhouse gas deep underground. Engineers at Pennsylvania State University have come up with a clever alternative: Turn it back into fuel. They combine the carbon dioxide with water vapor to make methane, the primary component of natural gas, which can be burned in a generator. The concept is not new, but the chemical reaction, which also yields oxygen, requires a lot of energy.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | By Marjorie Keen, Special to The Inquirer
The prospective owner of the Airport Industrial Mall is trying to work out a deal to bring a company that assembles fuel tanker trucks to the mall. A representative of the new owner - a family group operating as AIM Corp. whose principals thus far have remained anonymous - asked the Sadsbury Township supervisors Monday to waive conditions that would require the group to install roads and sewers. Frank LaMarr, the representative, told the supervisors that if the township gave Robert G. Watkins Jr. of East Fallowfield the green light to move his airplane fuel-truck business from Concordville to the mall, the mall's buyer would not ask for other special favors.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2012 | Andy Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In another development on the alternative-fuels front, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection says it is looking for suggestions on how to dole out $20 million in grants to help municipal and commercial vehicle fleet owners convert to compressed natural gas and liquefied natural gas. DEP has set up a website that offers information on its Natural Gas Energy Development Program as well as existing NGV fueling tools and...
NEWS
September 6, 1995 | By Sonya Senkowsky, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Officials suspect that the oil and gasoline leakage from the BP storage facility may have spread to more properties, including an athletic field, and may be larger than first thought. The contamination is the result of 75 years of spills, not leaking pipes or tanks, according to company officials. Borough engineers said at a council meeting last night that a report released by BP last month shows fuel in the groundwater beneath the Mantua Avenue athletic field's parking lot. The field is across the street from BP Oil Inc.'s Mantua Avenue tank farm.
NEWS
October 1, 1995 | By Robert F. O'Neill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
On this, the 50th anniversary of the end of World War II, probably very few people recall the role played in that Allied victory by the Sun Oil Co. in Marcus Hook and an expatriate Frenchman named Eugene J. Houdry. It was a role that not only hastened the defeat of the Axis powers, but gave future generations higher living standards and better modes of transportation. All because of better, cheaper gasoline. Sun Oil was a leading producer of the high-octane aviation fuel used during the war, and Houdry, then in his 40s, was the one who made it possible with development of the first successful catalytic process for refining crude oil. Catalytic, or "cat," cracking was a revolution in refining, the most important innovation in the history of the petroleum industry.
NEWS
February 11, 1986 | By MICHAEL DAYS, Daily News Staff Writer
People who qualify for the federally funded Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program will receive an unexpected 20 percent increase in yearly grants to help heat their homes this winter, Gov. Thornburgh said yesterday. But even with the increase, most recipients still will be getting a significantly lower subsidy than they received last year. The state said it doesn't keep figures on the average subsidy granted statewide this year because of the formula's complexity. The Philadelphia Gas Works said its records indicate PGW customers who qualified for the subsidy have received an average grant of $139.
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NEWS
August 16, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Columnist
And now, an update from the world of - The election is rigged! They're stealing your vote! Fraud, fraud, everywhere! The election is not rigged. Your vote has not been stolen. The conspiracy theorists who claim these many frauds still can't show us any proof. This, despite claims from Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, who predicted during a rally in Altoona on Friday that the only way he can lose the vote in Pennsylvania "is if cheating goes on. " There's a problem with Trump's math.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
Steady employment growth over the last several quarters has created a large pool of renters and helped boost the fortunes of the Philadelphia region's apartment market, real estate investment services firm Marcus & Millichap says. The increase in jobs - 60,000 new ones are anticipated by the end of 2016 - has resulted in the formation of 23,700 new households in the region over the last four quarters, the firm's research shows. As a result of this increasing demand for rental apartments, Marcus & Millichap says, developers are accelerating construction and permit activity for multifamily projects.
NEWS
July 25, 2016 | By Al Haas, Staff Writer
At first or even second glance, it's hard to tell there's anything special about Toyota's new Mirai sedan. But the Mirai isn't a typical car. Instead, it's a fuel-cell vehicle, a kind of eco-friendly car that's been talked about for years but is rarely seen on regular roads. That situation may be about to change because the technology has matured and more fueling stations are coming online. I got the opportunity to test-drive a Mirai recently and got a sense of the current state of fuel-cell cars.
NEWS
July 16, 2016
By Merrill Matthews This month's Democratic convention will be a hotbed of anti-fossil-fuel vitriol. The policy platform, invited speakers, and nominee herself all support a war against oil and natural gas. Gone are the days when Democrats supported nuclear power and natural gas. Gone are the days when they championed the fossil-fuel industry because it supports millions of high-paying, blue-collar jobs. Gone are the days when Democrats seriously pursued an energy-independent United States.
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Alexandra Villarreal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Backflips off a podium. Piano keys screaming under pounding feet instead of careful fingers. Sombreros and leis adorning heads and necks, and cucumbers zooming in and out of focus on a massive screen. Such was the scene Tuesday at BB&T Pavilion, alive with energy and booming with charisma thanks to a testosterone-fueled lineup of seasoned artists with personalities as magnetic as their music. Panic! at the Disco and Weezer are on the road together this summer, joined by special guest Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness.
TRAVEL
July 4, 2016
Q: I am hoping you can assist with an issue I had with my car rental for my son's wedding. Last August, I rented a car from Payless Car Rental in Denver. It was moveĀ­in time for the surrounding colleges, and after waiting in line for almost two hours to rent the car, I was worried about returning the car, since I had a long drive to get back to the airport and a limited amount of time to catch my return flight. So, I decided to prepay for my fuel, at a charge of $35. I also allowed them to talk me into an "upgrade" because I was worried about the cargo space needed for luggage and wedding items.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
At farmers' markets this season, alongside the kale and radishes, there are unaccustomed local offerings. Think tulsi bitters for digestion and relaxation, elderberry syrup for immune support, or raspberry leaf tea for pregnant women. Also new to farmers' market shoppers: disclaimers - that the wares are "not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. " This is an offshoot of the farm-to-table movement: Call it the farm-to-medicine-cabinet movement. It's powered by a new generation of farmer-herbalists like Amanda Midkiff, 26, who last year started Locust Light Farm in New Hope, one of a growing number of farm-based apothecaries in the area.
NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Sunoco L.P., the Dallas company that owns the Sunoco retail fuel chain, announced Wednesday it acquired small convenience store networks in upstate New York and in Texas. The company said it paid $76.4 million for 18 convenience stores in New York state from Valentine Stores, Inc. The purchase includes 18 company-operated locations that sell 20 million gallons of fuel annually and one standalone Tim Hortons restaurant. Sunoco also bought the "Rattlers" retail convenience store assets and wholesale fuel business from Kolkhorst Petroleum, Inc. The acquisition, for an undisclosed price, includes 14 company-operated locations and a wholesale fuel supply network in the greater Austin, Houston and Waco, Texas markets, that sells or distributes 46 million gallons of fuel a year.
NEWS
May 30, 2016
ISSUE | FOSSIL FUELS It's time to clean up our act Fossil fuels must go ("Can fossil fuels be replaced?" Tuesday). They are a detriment to our environment and our economy. It has been widely accepted that climate change is real and will lead to catastrophe in our lifetimes if we do not act soon. Last year was the warmest on record, with 2014 ranking second, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and there's scientific evidence that points to excess carbon and fossil-fuel emissions as a likely cause.
NEWS
May 25, 2016
By Kyle Isakower The Paris climate agreement was signed less than a month ago, yet the United States is already one-third of the way to achieving the emissions reductions we committed to. We pledged to cut greenhouse-gas emissions 26 to 28 percent below 2005 levels by 2025, and emissions are down 9 percent compared with 2005 levels. How did we do it? Largely through greater use of clean-burning natural gas. The U.S. Energy Information Administration reports that energy-related carbon dioxide emissions dropped 12 percent below 2005 levels last year, "mostly because of ... increased use of natural gas for electricity generation.
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