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Fuel Efficiency

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NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Jim Kuhnhenn, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama said Saturday that standards for vehicle fuel economy set under his administration and better cars built by a resurgent U.S. auto industry would save money at the gas pump over the long term, a counterpoint to Republican criticism of his energy policy. In his weekly radio and online address, Obama said Detroit automakers were on track to build cars that average nearly 55 miles per gallon by 2025, doubling current mileage standards. "That means folks will be able to fill up every two weeks instead of every week, saving the typical family more than $8,000 at the pump over time," he said.
NEWS
July 24, 2001 | By Froma Harrop
A great mystery of life is why American automakers go ballistic at any demand for better mileage on their SUVs and other light trucks. One can understand why the oilmen don't like fuel efficiency. The more gasoline pumped into the tank, the more money they make. That makes sense. But what's in it for Detroit? After all, the sort of miles-per-gallon increase likely to become law should not be that onerous. The standards are nearly 20 years old. American manufacturers have since made tremendous strides in fuel efficiency.
NEWS
August 16, 2001 | By Jerry Taylor
Although the late, great energy crisis seems to have come and gone, the political fight over yesterday's panic rages on. The big dust-up this fall will be over SUVs, light trucks and minivans. Should the government order Detroit to make them get more miles per gallon? Conservationists say "yes. " Economics 101 says "no. " Let's start with a simple question: Why should the government mandate conservation? When fuel becomes scarce, fuel prices go up. When fuel prices go up, people buy less fuel.
NEWS
January 26, 2012 | By Robin Mann
With prices at the pump high and threatening to climb higher, we need better, more efficient cars that guzzle less gas. That's why I joined hundreds of my fellow Pennsylvanians at a public hearing in Philadelphia last week to testify in support of new standards that would mean significant savings for drivers, cleaner air, a safer climate, more jobs, and better vehicle choices. A few weeks ago, President Obama proposed strengthening fuel-efficiency and carbon-pollution standards for cars and light trucks to 54.5 m.p.g.
NEWS
April 10, 1991 | By David Everett, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Contradicting the auto industry and Bush administration, a new study by a consumer activist group says manufacturers can build many more fuel-efficient cars without sacrificing passenger safety. In fact, says the study, released yesterday by the Center for Auto Safety, automakers can cut highway fatality rates by 20 percent over the next decade while boosting fuel efficiency by an astonishing 40 percent. More than 8,000 lives a year could be saved by 2001 if tougher safety standards were applied to passenger cars and trucks, the study said.
NEWS
July 24, 1988 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Automotive Writer
Those frustrating lines at the gas pumps during the last decade are washed- out memories now. Like the oil crises that spawned them, they have become almost distant enough to qualify as nostalgia. Gas is plentiful and inexpensive now. People are driving more, and big, powerful cars are back in vogue. Sounds like happy days are here again. Sounds like everything is just ducky in Wheelsville. But Michael Renner isn't so sure. Renner, 30, works for Worldwatch Institute, a non-profit Washington research organization that delves into global problems, then writes papers on them for the world's decision-makers, scholars and interested laymen.
NEWS
August 30, 2012
Over the next decade-plus, American motorists will find new fuel-efficient cars and trucks in showrooms that offer them the advantage of going twice as long between fill-ups. The estimated $8,000 in fuel savings over the life of a vehicle from that technological gain alone makes the Obama administration's launch this week of new vehicle mileage standards a milestone event - the first such boost in more than 30 years. But for an estimated 500,000 people, the mandate that automakers achieve an average fleet fuel economy of 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025 also means they'll be driving to new jobs.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2011 | By Scott Sturgis, For The Inquirer
So the government is going to mandate more stringent fuel-efficiency standards for passenger cars, perhaps as high as 56 m.p.g., come 2025, and automakers are worried about what it means for them. My initial response? Tough luck for the automakers. Every time there's a new government mandate, it seems automakers decry how impossible it would be to meet the standard and push for ways to reduce or lower it. Seat belts. Catalytic converters. Air bags. Crash tests. They all met resistance from the folks who make the vehicles we drive.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2007 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gasoline prices continue to edge up - to an average of $2.73 a gallon locally - and Clayton Lane continues to buy Toyota Prius cars for PhillyCarShare's fleet of 300 vehicles. "We buy them constantly because they are among the most fuel-efficient cars on the market," said Lane, deputy executive director of the nonprofit agency that promotes shared car ownership. More and more motorists and fleet buyers are doing the same as gasoline prices continue to rise, according to the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2003 | By Sumana Chatterjee INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Senate rejected a bid yesterday to raise fuel-efficiency standards for all automobiles, including sport-utility vehicles and minivans, bowing to concerns that the move might hurt sales and cost jobs. Sen. Richard Durbin (D., Ill.) sponsored the measure to raise fuel-efficiency targets by 2015, to 40 miles per gallon from 27.5 miles per gallon now, and to apply the standard to popular SUVs and minivans that now must meet a lower standard, 20.7 miles per gallon. He argued that greater fuel efficiency would improve air quality and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil. Motor vehicles consume more than half of all U.S. oil imports.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 2, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
A spectator could learn an incredible amount of minutiae about the new Cadillac Escalade simply by swiping through an iPad display at Saturday's opening of the 2015 Philadelphia Auto Show. There were statistics on how much all that gleaming metal weighs, how fast the sinewy SUV accelerates, even the type of stitches used to make the steering wheel covers. But not a single word about how much gasoline it burns. "That was a marketing decision," explained a Cadillac representative who identified himself only by his first name, Chad.
NEWS
August 30, 2012
Over the next decade-plus, American motorists will find new fuel-efficient cars and trucks in showrooms that offer them the advantage of going twice as long between fill-ups. The estimated $8,000 in fuel savings over the life of a vehicle from that technological gain alone makes the Obama administration's launch this week of new vehicle mileage standards a milestone event - the first such boost in more than 30 years. But for an estimated 500,000 people, the mandate that automakers achieve an average fleet fuel economy of 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025 also means they'll be driving to new jobs.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2012 | Al Haas
Maybe EcoBoosterism is the new corporate religion at Ford. The automaker keeps developing more new EcoBoost engines and dropping them into more and more vehicles. Indeed, it plans to build 1.6 million of them for the global market in 2013. With good reason, we might add. The high-tech EcoBoost design finds the holy grail of engine development by increasing both performance and fuel economy — qualities that normally are mutually exclusive. The EcoBoost achieves this win-win in several ways.
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
I made a few stops on the way home the other night, which meant my car's engine had to warm up several times and my gas mileage for the trip was down a bit - 55.2 miles a gallon. Yes, I have a Prius. But normally I can do a few miles a gallon better. It was late. Orion was high overhead. And as I stood in the driveway gazing at it, I had a diabolical thought. Normally I put so much effort into increasing my mileage. I drive the speed limit and coast to every red light.
NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Jim Kuhnhenn, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama said Saturday that standards for vehicle fuel economy set under his administration and better cars built by a resurgent U.S. auto industry would save money at the gas pump over the long term, a counterpoint to Republican criticism of his energy policy. In his weekly radio and online address, Obama said Detroit automakers were on track to build cars that average nearly 55 miles per gallon by 2025, doubling current mileage standards. "That means folks will be able to fill up every two weeks instead of every week, saving the typical family more than $8,000 at the pump over time," he said.
NEWS
January 26, 2012 | By Robin Mann
With prices at the pump high and threatening to climb higher, we need better, more efficient cars that guzzle less gas. That's why I joined hundreds of my fellow Pennsylvanians at a public hearing in Philadelphia last week to testify in support of new standards that would mean significant savings for drivers, cleaner air, a safer climate, more jobs, and better vehicle choices. A few weeks ago, President Obama proposed strengthening fuel-efficiency and carbon-pollution standards for cars and light trucks to 54.5 m.p.g.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2011 | By Scott Sturgis, For The Inquirer
So the government is going to mandate more stringent fuel-efficiency standards for passenger cars, perhaps as high as 56 m.p.g., come 2025, and automakers are worried about what it means for them. My initial response? Tough luck for the automakers. Every time there's a new government mandate, it seems automakers decry how impossible it would be to meet the standard and push for ways to reduce or lower it. Seat belts. Catalytic converters. Air bags. Crash tests. They all met resistance from the folks who make the vehicles we drive.
NEWS
June 3, 2011 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
The economy car, for years viewed by many Americans as the unwanted misfit of U.S. showrooms, is fast becoming a jewel that doesn't come cheap. Growing consumer demand for fuel-efficient cars, tight supplies, and automakers' cutbacks in recent months on incentives such as cash rebates and financing deals have increased prices for compact cars, and industry analysts say it's not clear when the trend might ease. Want a small Honda? Toyota? Ford? Don't expect dealers to do you any favors.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2011 | By Scott Sturgis, For The Inquirer
Great moments in engineering don't always come from multinational corporations with multizillion-dollar budgets. Sometimes the feats come from hardworking young people - and perhaps a mentor or four. That's just how one of the most fuel-efficient vehicles in the world was built right here, in West Philadelphia, and how the West Philly Hybrid X Team won not one but two national awards for two separate automotive projects this spring. Simon Hauger, electrical engineer turned high school teacher turned consultant, is the power behind the 15-student team from West Philadelphia High School.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
As a top executive at Subaru of America Inc. , Thomas J. Doll has traveled to Japan on business many times to meet with his colleagues in Tokyo. The earthquake and tsunami that devastated the northeast coast of Japan on March 11 didn't cause him to change plans to fly out from Newark two days later. However, after landing in Tokyo and learning that the State Department was advising U.S. citizens to avoid travel to Japan, Doll wound up cutting this visit short and returning to Cherry Hill.
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